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!! Ballina Chronicle; Apr 10, 1850; Emigration

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  • Cathy Joynt Labath
    BALLINA CHRONICLE Ballina, Mayo, Ireland Wednesday, April 10, 1850 EMIGRATION Mr. Buchanan, chief agent for emigration at Quebec, states, in his report for
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 31, 2005
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      BALLINA CHRONICLE
      Ballina, Mayo, Ireland
      Wednesday, April 10, 1850

      EMIGRATION
      Mr. Buchanan, chief agent for emigration at Quebec, states, in his
      report for 1849, to the Governor General of Canada, Lord Elgin: - The adult
      passengers on board the whole number of vessels (447) were 31,145. The 134
      ships from England might have legally carried 16,569 passengers more than
      the number embarked; the 59 vessels from Scotland might have carried 8,212
      more than they had; the vessels from Irish ports were 150, and these were
      filled to within 3,852 adult passengers. The average passages were - from
      England 45 days; from Ireland, 45 1/2; from Scotland 41 1/2. The emigration
      of 1849 shows a considerable increase in the mortality in comparison with
      that of 1848. The deaths from cholera on board three vessels from Limerick
      arrived in May - the Lady Peel, the Jane Black and the Jessie - carrying
      1,018 passengers, were 103. These on board the Jane, from New Ross, with 372
      passengers, were 33. These on board the Sarah from Sligo with 280, were 81.
      The greatest proportionate mortality occurred on board of vessels from the
      ports of Newry, Limerick, Dublin, Liverpool and Greenock. Among 851 persons
      from Newry, the deaths were 61; those among 7,285 from Limerick were, 353;
      of 2,274 from Dublin, 91 died; of 4,405 from Liverpool, there died 99; of
      625 from Greenock, 79 died. The brig "Hannah" from the port of Newry, was
      lost in the ice on the night of the 29th April. It appears that she sailed
      with 176 passengers; 14 persons went down with the vessel, and 35 perished
      subsequently from exposure. The other vessel was the brig, Maria, from
      Limerick, with 111 passengers, and a crew of 10 seamen. She foundered at sea
      on the night of the 12th May, in consequence of her coming in contact with
      sunken ice. Only nine passengers and three of the crew were saved. The total
      loss by these two disasters amounted therefore to 151 lives.


      Cathy Joynt Labath
      Ireland Old News
      http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
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