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!! Ballina Chronicle; Apr 3, 1850; Instructions to Emigrants

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  • Cathy Joynt Labath
    BALLINA CHRONICLE Ballina, Mayo, Ireland Wednesday, April 3, 1850 INSTRUCTIONS TO EMIGRANTS TO THE UNITED STATES; BY THE EMIGRANTS FRIEND SOCIETY OF
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 17, 2005
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      BALLINA CHRONICLE
      Ballina, Mayo, Ireland
      Wednesday, April 3, 1850


      INSTRUCTIONS TO EMIGRANTS TO THE UNITED STATES; BY THE EMIGRANTS' FRIEND
      SOCIETY OF PHILADELPHIA

      The following is taken from the American Citizen and Emigrant
      Advertiser of March 2nd, 1850, published at Philadelphia and New York:-
      1. Before making any arrangements for a passage, apply in person, or by
      letter, to the society at the port from which you design to sail, for advice
      and assistance in obtaining a ship, procuring provisions, &c. If there be no
      society or accredited agent in the port, then apply to the government
      emigration agent.
      2. After your ship leaves the port, your name and residence can be sent
      per steamer to the secretary of the Philadelphia society, and be received -
      so that your friends in America will have tidings of you before your
      arrival; but for this you will have to pay one shilling, the price of
      advertisement.
      3. Previous to leaving port, you will do well to procure a copy of
      "Hints to Emigrants," which will be an interesting book to read on the way,
      and will give you much valuable information and advice.
      4. Read carefully the annexed laws regulating emigrant ships, and see
      that everything on board is as the law directs.
      5. If your funds do not exceed £10, bring out the amount in new
      sovereigns, requesting the Captain to take charge of it during the voyage.
      The money should be sealed up, with your name, number of your berth, and the
      amount written on it. The frequent cases of money lost on board makes this
      plan desirable. If your funds exceed £10, deposit it in any banking house
      transacting business with the United States; bring with you a letter of
      credit, leaving a duplicate with some friend.
      6. If your port is New York, you will find on reaching quarantine, an
      agent distributing a handbill, headed "Office of commissioners of
      emigration." Read this bill carefully.
      On arriving at the wharf do not be in a hurry to go ashore. Leave your
      luggage in safe hands (do not trust a fellow passenger unless you know him),
      and go to the office of the American Citizen, where you will find suitable
      boarding houses advertised, and all other information that you may need. -
      Boarding houses advertised in the American Citizen, will generally treat you
      well, but to be secured from imposition, you must remember that the law
      requires the price of board and lodging to be hung up in the house; nothing
      is said about luggage, and a common method of swindling emigrants is to
      charge exorbitantly for storage, as it is called; make your bargain
      separately for this; you will pay nothing unless it is a large quantity; in
      that case have the agreement in writing. Unless otherwise directed under our
      authority, by our agent, or by the government agent, you had better purchase
      an inland passage ticket until you arrive in America.
      7. If you travel into the interior, take specie, and not bank bills.
      Purchase also what provisions you may need on the route, before you start,
      as you will often be charged exorbitant prices on the way.
      8. When you get settled in your new home, write to the office of the
      American Citizen, stating the particulars of your situation, prospects, &c.
      9. If you wish to get employment, go to the British Protection
      Society's Office, in Greenwich-street, or to the Irish Emigrant Office, in
      Spruce-street, or to the Commissioners of Emigration, City-Hall.
      10. Heed no one accosting you and offering you advice, either on board
      ship (save the commissioners agent), on the wharf, or in the street;
      especially avoid such persons as are very gentlemanly in appearance and
      profess great regard for you. Suffer no stranger, under any pretence
      whatever, to accompany you to an office, either at your port of embarkation
      or debarkation; if any one insists on accompanying you, give him in charge
      to a police-officer or let it be known at the office that you have not
      employed him. His object is to get commission at least, and this may come
      out of your pocket.
      11. If thus advised, you let the land sharks - the runners, get hold of
      you, it will, remember, be your own fault.
      The society's agent in Liverpool is Mr. E. Jones, 25, Union-street.


      Cathy Joynt Labath
      Ireland Old News
      http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
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