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!! Ballina Chronicle; Jan 30, 1850 "Convicts"

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  • Cathy Joynt Labath
    BALLINA CHRONICLE Ballina, Mayo, Ireland Wednesday, January 30, 1850 WHAT IS TO BE DONE WITH OUR CONVICTS? (From the Daily News) What is to be done with our
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 24, 2005
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      BALLINA CHRONICLE
      Ballina, Mayo, Ireland
      Wednesday, January 30, 1850

      WHAT IS TO BE DONE WITH OUR CONVICTS?
      (From the Daily News)
      What is to be done with our convicts? When the doors of all our other
      colonies were shut in their faces, it was believed that an asylum had been
      opened to them at Swan River. But, no. The Western Australians have been thrown
      into a fever of indignation on learning that their colony is to be made a penal
      settlement.
      We will not be accused by those who are in the habit of perusing our
      columns, of lightly estimating the evil of a convict immigration, or of lacking
      sympathy with a non-penal colony which resists any attempt to convert it into a
      receptacle for convicts. But we must be allowed to have a laugh at the virtuous
      indignation of the Western Australians.
      In February, 1849, they petitioned the Home Government to make their colony
      "a regular penal settlement." In November 1849, the Western Australians cannot
      find words to express their indignation on learning that their colony has been
      converted into a penal settlement. The reason is, that when they prayed the Home
      Government to send them convicts, they also prayed them to endow it with the
      "necessary government establishment and expenditure, the whole cost of the
      transmission, maintenance, and superintendence of all such convicts as may be
      transported hither being borne of course by the home Government." Ministers,
      like the heathen diety of old, have
      ______ "Granted half their prayer,
      The other half dispersed in empty air."
      The convicts have been, or are to be sent, but not the money.

      Cathy Joynt Labath
      Ireland Old News
      http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
    • Susan Patterson
      And the convicts continued to be sent until the 1890s so that when I was a girl in the fifities there were former convicts still alive in the West. This is of
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 24, 2005
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        And the convicts continued to be sent until the 1890s so that when I was a
        girl in the fifities there were former convicts still alive in the West.
        This is of interest as currently I am looking at the efforts of people in
        Tasmania to stop transportation in the 1840s and early 50s...
        Susan
        -----

        >
        > BALLINA CHRONICLE
        > Ballina, Mayo, Ireland
        > Wednesday, January 30, 1850
        >
        > WHAT IS TO BE DONE WITH OUR CONVICTS?
        > (From the Daily News)
        > What is to be done with our convicts? When the doors of all our other
        > colonies were shut in their faces, it was believed that an asylum had been
        > opened to them at Swan River. But, no. The Western Australians have been
        thrown
        > into a fever of indignation on learning that their colony is to be made a
        penal
        > settlement.
        > We will not be accused by those who are in the habit of perusing our
        > columns, of lightly estimating the evil of a convict immigration, or of
        lacking
        > sympathy with a non-penal colony which resists any attempt to convert it
        into a
        > receptacle for convicts. But we must be allowed to have a laugh at the
        virtuous
        > indignation of the Western Australians.
        > In February, 1849, they petitioned the Home Government to make their
        colony
        > "a regular penal settlement." In November 1849, the Western Australians
        cannot
        > find words to express their indignation on learning that their colony has
        been
        > converted into a penal settlement. The reason is, that when they prayed
        the Home
        > Government to send them convicts, they also prayed them to endow it with
        the
        > "necessary government establishment and expenditure, the whole cost of the
        > transmission, maintenance, and superintendence of all such convicts as may
        be
        > transported hither being borne of course by the home Government."
        Ministers,
        > like the heathen diety of old, have
        > ______ "Granted half their prayer,
        > The other half dispersed in empty air."
        > The convicts have been, or are to be sent, but not the money.
        >
        > Cathy Joynt Labath
        > Ireland Old News
        > http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Susan Patterson
        Of course that is incorrect and it is old age aberration I hope ! W A convicts stopped in 1868: can t begin to imagine what made me so convinced former
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 24, 2005
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          Of course that is incorrect and it is old age aberration I hope !
          W A convicts stopped in 1868: can't begin to imagine what made me so
          convinced former convicts were still alive in the 1950s. I must have been
          thinking of the time of Federation, 1901.

          Apologies to all !
          Susan----


          - Original Message -----
          From: "Susan Patterson" <aapatterson@...>
          To: <IrelandOldNews@yahoogroups.com>; "Ireland List"
          <ireland-l@...>; "General Ireland" <genire-l@...>
          Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2005 12:41 PM
          Subject: Re: [IrelandOldNews] !! Ballina Chronicle; Jan 30, 1850 "Convicts"


          >
          > And the convicts continued to be sent until the 1890s so that when I was a
          > girl in the fifities there were former convicts still alive in the West.
          > This is of interest as currently I am looking at the efforts of people in
          > Tasmania to stop transportation in the 1840s and early 50s...
          > Susan
          > -----
          >
          > >
          > > BALLINA CHRONICLE
          > > Ballina, Mayo, Ireland
          > > Wednesday, January 30, 1850
          > >
          > > WHAT IS TO BE DONE WITH OUR CONVICTS?
          > > (From the Daily News)
          > > What is to be done with our convicts? When the doors of all our
          other
          > > colonies were shut in their faces, it was believed that an asylum had
          been
          > > opened to them at Swan River. But, no. The Western Australians have been
          > thrown
          > > into a fever of indignation on learning that their colony is to be made
          a
          > penal
          > > settlement.
          > > We will not be accused by those who are in the habit of perusing
          our
          > > columns, of lightly estimating the evil of a convict immigration, or of
          > lacking
          > > sympathy with a non-penal colony which resists any attempt to convert it
          > into a
          > > receptacle for convicts. But we must be allowed to have a laugh at the
          > virtuous
          > > indignation of the Western Australians.
          > > In February, 1849, they petitioned the Home Government to make
          their
          > colony
          > > "a regular penal settlement." In November 1849, the Western Australians
          > cannot
          > > find words to express their indignation on learning that their colony
          has
          > been
          > > converted into a penal settlement. The reason is, that when they prayed
          > the Home
          > > Government to send them convicts, they also prayed them to endow it with
          > the
          > > "necessary government establishment and expenditure, the whole cost of
          the
          > > transmission, maintenance, and superintendence of all such convicts as
          may
          > be
          > > transported hither being borne of course by the home Government."
          > Ministers,
          > > like the heathen diety of old, have
          > > ______ "Granted half their prayer,
          > > The other half dispersed in empty air."
          > > The convicts have been, or are to be sent, but not the money.
          > >
          > > Cathy Joynt Labath
          > > Ireland Old News
          > > http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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