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    unsubscribe ... From: Cathy Joynt Labath To: Ireland List ; General Ireland ; oldnews
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 17, 2004
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Cathy Joynt Labath" <labaths@...>
      To: "Ireland List" <ireland-l@...>; "General Ireland"
      <genire-l@...>; "oldnews ireland" <irelandoldnews@yahoogroups.com>
      Cc: <irl-galway-l@...>
      Sent: Saturday, June 12, 2004 5:39 PM
      Subject: [IrelandOldNews] !! Times; Feb 3, 1836 "Collins Found Innocent"


      > The Times
      > London, Middlesex, England
      > Wednesday, Feb. 3, 1836
      >
      > THE INNOCENCE OF A MAN CONDEMNED TO DIE IN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS,
      PROVIDENTIALLY
      > DISCOVERED.
      > At the last Galway assizes Michael Ryan was found guilty of the
      murder of
      > his wife Bridget Ryan, and a man of the name of Collins was found guilty
      of
      > aiding and abetting him in the dreadful deed. The evidence offered to
      sustain
      > the prosecution was purely circumstantial; but every part of it was as
      perfect
      > as conclusive, as could be produced in a court of justice. The voluntary
      > statements which Ryan made at the inquest, before the coroner and two
      > magistrates of the county, were confirmed in their most important
      particulars,
      > and were considered decisive as to the guilty participation of Collins in
      the
      > foul unnatural deed. Ryan was silent as the verdict was delivered; but
      Collins
      > loudly protested his innocence. Both were immediately offered for
      execution on
      > the following Monday. But about 2 o'clock on the Saturday a clergyman was
      seen
      > in earnest conversation with the Judge. It was evident, from the
      impressiveness
      > of his manner, that he was communicating something of painful interest and
      of
      > the utmost importance. The Judge retired to his chamber, and by his order
      to the
      > Sheriff, stayed the execution for a fortnight. In the mean time some most
      > singular disclosures were made by Ryan. The mayor and several other
      magistrates
      > were in attendance. Ryan accounted so clearly for every circumstance that
      > attached suspicion to poor Collins, afforded them such a clue to
      investigate and
      > to test the truth of his assertions, that not a shadow of doubt could rest
      on
      > their minds of the perfect innocence of Collins. The documents, the
      evidence of
      > the trial, and the result of their subsequent investigation, were laid
      before
      > the Privy Council at the Castle of Dublin. In the mean time the sentence
      of
      > Collins was respited; but the law was allowed to take its course in the
      case of
      > Ryan; he was brought out on the scaffold, and there, in the presence of
      the
      > sheriff, the Mayor of Galway, and the chaplain of the gaol, he again
      solemnly
      > declared the perfect innocence of Collins-"That he (Collins) had had
      neither
      > hand, act or part in the murder;" that he had no knowledge of it.
      Immediately
      > afterwards he was launched into eternity. Collins was brought out of the
      "dead
      > room" (condemned cell), and in less than a month an order came down from
      the
      > Castle for his unconditional liberation. After his liberation a few pounds
      were
      > collected for him in the town of Galway, to enable him to return home, and
      enter
      > gain on that life of industry on which a wife and four children depended
      for
      > support.
      >
      > Cathy Joynt Labath
      > Ireland Old News
      > http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
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