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!! Ballina Chronicle; Sep 26, 1849 "Novel Interment"

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  • Cathy Joynt Labath
    BALLINA CHRONICLE Ballina, Mayo, Ireland Wednesday, Sept 26, 1849 CORK POLICE OFFICE- Saturday. NOVEL INTERMENT Constable Hosford placed and elderly female,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 6, 2003
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      BALLINA CHRONICLE
      Ballina, Mayo, Ireland
      Wednesday, Sept 26, 1849

      CORK POLICE OFFICE- Saturday.
      NOVEL INTERMENT
      Constable Hosford placed and elderly female, named Ellen Riordan, better
      known as "Kerry Nell," before the Bench, for "raising the wind" under the
      following curious circumstances.
      Mr. E. Newsom informed the bench that he had the honour of being,
      unfortunately for himself, church-warden of the parish of St. Finn Barr. Being
      aware of the various modes that parties adopted to plunder the citizens, by
      obtaining money from church-wardens for foundlings, he was determined, as far as
      lay within his power, to prevent it, the children were put on the parish for
      support, who should have been supported by their parents; the parish also
      plundered by getting money for children who were dead; and, as in the present
      case, plunder was obtained by interments though foundlings had not died. The
      prisoner now before the bench had obtained a parish coffin for a foundling,
      which of course the citizens had to pay for. This coffin she carried to St. Finn
      Barr's church-yard and interred there, which entitled her to a certificate from
      the clergyman of the burial of the foundling. On the production of that
      certificate to him, the prisoner would be entitled to the expenses of interment,
      and what nursing money was due. This the prisoner had done, but he (Mr. Newsom)
      thinking that all was not right, went to the churchyard and had the coffin dug
      up, when, to his surprise, on its being opened, he found it to be filled with
      stones, which
      Captain White remarked jocosely was deserving of antiquarian inquiry.
      Mr. Newsom said the best of the story was, that the prisoner, when
      overlooking the interment of the coffin, appeared, as he was informed, deeply
      affected for the dead child; and so desirous was she that it should be deposited
      in its final resting place with every care and affection that she would not
      allow any person to touch it, and actually placed the coffin in the grave
      herself.
      Captain White inquired what the prisoner had to say in defence?
      Constable Hosford- She has made a voluntary confession that she had buried
      the coffin, but the reason she gave was, that Mr. Newsom had refused to pay her
      for another child because she was unable to obtain a certificate from the
      clergyman.
      Mr. Newsom- When the proper time comes I'll prove that the child was
      interred in Carrignaver churchyard, the certificates for which I hold in my
      hand. As Mr. Hodder, the law agent to the church-wardens, is absent, for the
      present remand the prisoner, against whom information shall be sworn."
      Captain White-That shall be done.

      Cathy Joynt Labath
      Ireland Old News
      http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
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