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Ballina Chronicle; 21 Aug 1850; Extraordinary Affair

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  • Cathy Joynt Labath
    BALLINA CHRONICLE Ballina, Co. Mayo Wednesday, August 21, 1850 EXTRAORDINARY AFFAIR On Saturday night, the wine and spirit store in Hill-street, belonging to
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 24, 2006
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      BALLINA CHRONICLE
      Ballina, Co. Mayo
      Wednesday, August 21, 1850





      EXTRAORDINARY AFFAIR

      On Saturday night, the wine and spirit store in Hill-street, belonging
      to Mr. Joseph Purdy, was entered by some persons, doubtless with the
      intention of stealing. A mill-race runs past one side of the premises; and
      the fellows, crossing the race [ink blot] an entrance at the rere. By
      raising up the [ink blot] door step-stone, and creeping underneath the door.
      The watchman on the beat, perceiving light in the store, gave the alarm, and
      very soon after the house was surrounded by a large crowd. Then commenced a
      scene the like of which was never, perhaps, in this or any other town. The
      lads inside, seeing escape hopeless, and having partaken freely of the good
      things at their command, defended themselves by throwing bottles out of the
      windows, so that no one dare approach near the doors or windows of the
      house. They kept up a perfect shower of these dangerous missiles, inflicting
      sundry wounds and bruises on several of the police and crowd. At last the
      police effected an entrance into the lower part of the store, when they
      found that the boys had drawn up a ladder leading to the second story and
      let down a trap door, thus cutting off access to them from below. Another
      ladder was procured and after great exertions, the trap door was raised, but
      immediately there came such a shower of bottles down on the heads of those
      beneath, that they were glad to get out of the way. The rascals, thinking to
      escape by the roof, broke through it both in front and rere, and flung the
      slates at the police and crowd. The people, however, beat them back with
      stones. Finally, after several hours had been spent in fruitless efforts to
      make them prisoners, the police broke through the wall of the adjoining
      house, on the same level with the desperadoes, and arrested them. It was
      thought there were three or four prisoners, and if there were any more, they
      must have escaped during the battle. Next morning, when day dawned, the
      house looked a perfect wreck, and the streets were covered to a considerable
      distance with broken bottles.
      The two prisoners were brought up this morning. Their names are James
      Flinn, a sweep, aged about 24; and Arthur Murphy, a boy about 17 or 18 years
      old. Flinn had a rag about his shoulders, and all Murphy had on was a pair
      of terry canvass trousers and an old torn shirt.
      Informations to Quarter Sessions.-- Newry Telegraph.



      -- The emigration to New York in the last week of July, amounted to the
      enormous number of 12,591.



      Cathy Joynt Labath
      Ireland Old News
      http://www.IrelandOldNews.com/
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