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Grasping informants selling false information to agents looking for anything to justify the policies of their leaders (Sunday, January 01, 2006)

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  • jim@leftopia.com
     Iraq Front News Subscribe: IraqFrontNews-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Sunday, January 01, 2006 News roundup by Jim Galasyn
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 1, 2006
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      Sunday, January 01, 2006
      News roundup by Jim Galasyn
       
       
       
      Iraq Front News

      Sunday, January 01, 2006

      Bring Them Home

      Fool Me Once

      Hearts And Minds

      White Man's Burden

       


       

      Graph of US Military Deaths


      Graph of US Military Casualties


      Civilians reported killed by military intervention in Iraq
      Min
      Max

      Iraq Body Count


      Cost of War

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      Insurgents explode 12 car bombs in Iraq
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      Twelve car bombs exploded around Iraq on Sunday, including eight in Baghdad that detonated within a three-hour window, as insurgents continued their attacks in the new year. The bombs injured at least 20 people but killed no one, police said

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      Barrage of Car Bombings Wounds 20 in Iraq
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 23:56:26 GMT

      Militants blew up 13 cars in three hours Sunday, injuring at least 20 people while 13 Iraqis were killed in other violence that fed the turmoil following last month's contested parliamentary elections.

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      Insurgents Explode 8 Car Bombs in Baghdad
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 11:43:06 GMT

      Insurgents exploded eight car bombs in separate attacks in Baghdad early Sunday, wounding 11 people but causing no deaths, police said.

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      Car bomb wounds 16 in Beiji
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      Up to 16 civilian Iraqis were wounded Sunday in the town of Beiji, when a booby-trapped car targeting a joint patrol of the US and Iraqi armies went off, an Iraqi interior ministry source told KUNA.

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      Two suicide car bombs hit US, Iraqi forces
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      Two suicide car bombs struck a U.S. and Iraqi forces north of Baghdad on Sunday, killing an Iraqi soldier and wounding 24 others, including civilians, a source from Iraqi-U.S. liaison office in Tikrit told Xinhua.

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      Car bombs, fuel riots usher in New Year in Iraq
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:36:50 GMT

      Fuel riots and more than a dozen car bombs greeted the New Year in Iraq as relatives celebrated the release of one Cypriot, one Lebanese and five Sudanese hostages by their captors.

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      Four Iraqi Soldiers Killed in Patrol West of Baghdad
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      A roadside bomb struck an Iraqi army patrol on Sunday in the western flashpoint city of Fallujah, killing four soldiers, witnesses and medical sources said. "A roadside bomb went off early in the morning on the main street in central Fallujah...

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      Three US troops killed
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      Three American soldiers were killed and others wounded when a US patrol hit by a bomb in Miqdadia in east Baghdad on Sunday. Elsewhere, a US camp at central Fallujah was attacked at the outset of the new year by resistance fighters

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      Nine gunned down
      January 1, 2006

      BAGHDAD: Gunmen in a car yesterday shot dead nine men and injured 16 as they sat along the banks of the Tigris river in eastern Baghdad, police and hospital officials said. The men were sitting on the banks of the river in al-Sarafiya just after dark when a black Opel four-door sedan drove by and the gunmen opened fire, Lieutenant Nadhim Nassar said. They were taken to Medical City hospital, Dr Naim al-Daradji said. The neighbourhood is mixed religion and it was unclear why the men were shot, but police said they were drinking alcoholic beverages. Meanwhile, inspections of two Iraqi-run jails, prompted by the recent discovery of a bunker packed with mistreated prisoners, found overcrowding and signs of prisoner abuse. Iraqi and American inspectors made the new findings at a Baghdad facility and one in Tal Afar, a US military official said. The findings suggest broader problems at other Iraqi-run detention facilities.

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      Four killed in Iraq fuel protests: police
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 17:06:34 GMT

      Security forces in Iraq shot dead four people protesting against a recent hike in fuel prices on Sunday, police said, after rioters set cars and petrol stations on fire near the northern oil city of Kirkuk.

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      1 Iraqi soldier killed, 3 by roadside bomb in Ishaki
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      An Iraqi soldier was killed and three wounded when their patrol hit a roadside bomb in Ishaki district near Balad, 90 km (55 miles) north of Baghdad, police said.

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      Indiana soldier killed in explosion in Iraq
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      A soldier with the 101st Airborne was killed in Iraq on Friday when an improvised explosive device detonated near his Humvee, the Army said. Pvt. Jonathan R. Pfender, 22, of Evansville, Ind., was killed in Bayji, Iraq...

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      Soldier with Maine ties dies in Iraq
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      Sgt. 1st Class Shawn Christopher Dostie died Friday from an improvised explosive device attack in Baghdad, according to the governor's office. Dostie was on active duty from Fort Campbell, Ky.

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      MNF: Task Force Baghdad Soldier killed (Confirmed)
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      A Task Force Baghdad Soldier died from wounds caused by a mortar attack that struck his patrol in southern Baghdad Dec. 31. The name of the Soldier is being withheld pending notification of next of kin.

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      Body found south of Baghdad
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      The body of an unidentified man, whose hands were bound and who had been shot to death, was also found by police south of the capital.

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      Infantrymen patrolling dusty intersection in Iraqi village
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 21:09:07 GMT

      ADIAH, Iraq--They are infantrymen who carry big rifles and are trained to fire a mobile missile system to destroy enemy tanks.

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      Truck drivers log millions of difficult miles in Iraq
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      When it comes to describing Iraq, few soldiers can talk about it better than the members of Nebraska Army National Guard's 1075th Transportation Company.

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      Mortar Attack in Iraq Destroys Family
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:42:15 GMT

      Across from a wounded insurgent and a silent, bandaged Iraqi soldier stood a white crib, draped with a towel in a futile attempt to block the glow of fluorescent lights.

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      Bush Awards 9 Purple Hearts to U.S. Troops
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:08:54 GMT

      President Bush began the new year on Sunday at the bedsides of wounded servicemen and women, and awarded nine Purple Hearts to U.S. troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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      Traumas of Iraq war begin to fade for former soldier
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      In October 2003, (Jared) Myers, 25, was a sergeant driving an unarmored Humvee to his base in Baquba, Iraq when it was struck by a roadside bomb. The blast killed his commander, Capt. John Teal, who was sitting in the seat next to him...

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      Death Toll for the American Military in Iraq in 2005 Is 844
      January 1, 2006

      BAGHDAD, Iraq, Dec. 31 - At least 844 American service members were killed in Iraq in 2005, nearly matching 2004's total of 848, and the number of service members wounded in 2005 was significantly higher than in the previous year, according to information released by the United States government and a nonprofit organization that tracks casualties in Iraq. In 2005, the number of Americans wounded in Iraq, 9,157, exceeded the number wounded in 2004, when the total was 7,956. The deaths of two Americans announced by the United States military on Friday - a marine killed by gunfire in Falluja and a soldier killed by a roadside bomb in Baghdad - brought the total killed since the war in Iraq began in March 2003 to 2,178. The total wounded since the war began is 15,955. In 2005, the single bloodiest month for American soldiers and marines was January, when 107 were killed and nearly 500 were wounded. At the time, American forces were conducting numerous operations to secure the country for the elections on Jan. 30. The second worst month was October, when 96 Americans were killed and 603 wounded. More than half of all 2005 American military deaths, 427, were caused by homemade bombs, most of them planted along roadsides and detonated as vehicles passed. American commanders have said that roadside bombs, the leading cause of death in Iraq, have grown larger and more sophisticated. Many, for instance, are triggered by remote detonators, and are large enough to destroy heavily armored tanks and troop carriers. The totals were compiled by Iraq Coalition Casualty Count, a nonprofit group that tracks American service members killed and wounded in Iraq. The Associated Press, which keeps its own statistics, reported the year's death toll as slightly lower, saying 841 had been killed. On Saturday, violence flared across Iraq. In Khalis, north of Baghdad, a bomb killed five members of the Iraqi Islamic Party, a Sunni political party that defied insurgent threats and fielded candidates in the Dec. 15 election. Since 2003, at least 75 members of the party have been killed. In central Baghdad, a roadside bomb struck an Iraqi police patrol, killing two officers. In historical terms, the number of casualties in Iraq is still relatively small. At the height of the Vietnam War, the American military was sustaining 500 killed and wounded each week. At the Battle of the Somme in 1916, about 58,000 British soldiers were killed or wounded on the first day. In interviews, American commanders have said that the relatively unchanging number of deaths in Iraq from 2004 to 2005 belies the progress that that had been made here against the guerrilla insurgency and in setting up democratic institutions. Three nationwide votes were held this year, including a referendum on a permanent constitution and an election to choose a four-year parliament. Although the number of attacks against American and Iraqi forces in and around Baghdad has grown over the past year - to about 28 per day now from about 22 a year ago - only about 10 percent of those attacks inflict casualties, said Maj. Gen. William G. Webster Jr., the commander of American forces in and around Baghdad. A year ago, about 25 percent of attacks inflicted casualties. More than 400 car and suicide bombs struck the country in 2005, although the number has dropped sharply in recent months. In April, for instance, there were 66 suicide and car bomb attacks, compared with 28 in November. An Iraqi employee of The New York Times contributed reporting for this article.

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      A Look at U.S. Military Deaths in Iraq
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 23:40:23 GMT

      As of Sunday, Jan. 1, 2006, at least 2,179 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003, according to an Associated Press count. At least 1,705 died as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers. The figures include five military civilians.

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      Bush Defends Domestic Spying Program
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 19:18:12 GMT

      President Bush on Sunday strongly defended his domestic spying program, saying it's a limited initiative that tracks only incoming calls to the United States.

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      Bush Opens '06 With Focus on Economy, Iraq
      Mon, 02 Jan 2006 00:43:16 GMT

      President Bush is starting his sixth year in office with a flurry of activity designed to trumpet upturns in the economy, defend U.S. action in Iraq and challenge critics who claim his methods of fighting terrorists infringe on civil liberties.

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      Commander: al-Qaida Stymied in Iraq's West
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 23:37:26 GMT

      Recent offensives near the Iraqi border with Syria have dealt a significant blow to al-Qaida and cut off the group's ability to smuggle in foreigners through the volatile western area to join the insurgency, a U.S. commander said Sunday.

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      Iraqi military, police needs to be more 'inclusive': top US general
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 16:48:34 GMT

      The top US military officer, General Peter Pace, urged Iraq's government to pursue a more 'inclusive' military and police force, saying in an interview that such a move should include a bid to recruit more former Sunni officers and troops.

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      The Murray Torture Telegrams
      31 December 2005

      The Murray Torture Telegrams Saturday, 31 December 2005 By now, the world -- or at least the blogosphere -- has seen the documents released by former UK diplomat Craig Murray, proving that the Bush and Blair governments both knew that the "intelligence" they were receiving from Uzbekistan was the result of gruesome and agonizing tortures on thousands of innocent people. Bush and Blair knew this -- yet Bush continued to "render" his Terror War captives to Uzbekistan, and shower the nation's Stalinist dictator, Karimov, with gold, guns and public honor. And despite Blair's repeated and strenuous denials of any complicity in America's heinous practice of "rendition" (indeed, in one recent Parliamentary appearance, Blair pretended that he didn't even understand what the term meant), Murray's documents prove that Britain's leadership knew full well what was happening in Karimov's torture chambers. Yet, like their American counterparts, British officials not only condoned the Uzbek tortures, they also spent considerable energy in devising contorted -- and specious -- "justifications" for using the tainted fruits of these evil practices. And evil is the word for it. Murray, while still serving as UK ambassador to Uzbekistan, dug up proof that the tortures condoned by Bush and Blair included boiling prisoners to death, in addition to the traditional methods of pulling out fingernails, beating, starving, and raping. Nor were these refinements limited to the prisoners themselves -- their family members were also tortured to produce "confessions." One chilling case unearthed by Murray, who witnessed the Stalinist show trials mounted by Karimov's judicial goons, featured a peasant farmer who was forced to confess to extensive family links to Osama Bin Laden -- after seeing his children tortured before his eyes. At the show trial, the old man renounced his confession and exposed the torture of children -- and was promptly hustled away. All of this -- and much more -- Murray reported at the time to his superiors in London, and to his diplomatic colleagues from Europe and the United States. At every turn, he found either resigned complicity -- "What can we do? The US supports Karimov?" -- to outright embrace of torture from -- who else? -- Bush's own man in Tashkent, who told Murray that the "reduction of civil liberties" under Karimov was "no bad thing," since it was being done in the name of combatting Islamic extremism. Here we see the Bushist ethos in essence: Everything is permitted -- torture, murder, rape, kidnapping, aggression -- in the name of "fighting terrorism." Bush has of course brought this police state philosophy to America, as even the mainstream media is beginning to report. Murray's release of these documents -- an end run around the Blair government's threat to censor his whistle-blowing book on his tenure in Uzbekistan -- is yet another of a whole battery of smoking guns proving the pervasive criminality of the oh-so-Christian Coalition of Bush and Blair. Empire Burlesque's intrepid webmaster, RichardK, has been on top of this story quite literally from the beginning; he was among the first to receive Murray's documents upon their release this week, and the first to get them out into the blogosphere. He has compiled a detailed -- and growing -- compendium of stories and documents relating to Murray's revelations, which can be found here. You should avail yourself of Rich's remarkable labors with all speed. One very significant item unearthed by Rich is a speech Murray gave at York University last February. Here you will find a good overview of Murray's "journey through dark heat" in Tashkent. But there is also another telling revelation buried in the speech, almost as an aside, which does much to explain how the "intelligence" community -- which now appears to have swallowed the US-UK governments whole -- really works. Murray tells of his time as a diplomatic officer in Warsaw in the 1990s. He meets a Polish informant, who retails some hot gossip about something the Polish prime minister allegedly did. But Murray was at the event where the indiscretion supposedly took place, and knew that the story was false. The next day, Murray saw the same informant talking with another UK "diplomat" who was in fact an undercover MI6 man. "Low and behold the very next day I received on my desk in its striking bright red cover a piece of MI6 intelligence material containing this [false] story about the Polish Prime Minister," Murray told the students. The next time he saw the informant, he asked why he'd given the false information to the MI6 agent. The informant smiled and said, "Well, he paid me $8,000 for it." And that, dear friends, is the basis of much of the "intelligence" upon which the "War on Terror" is now based: grasping informants selling false information to agents looking for anything to justify the policies of their leaders. We already know of cases of innocent captives in Guantanamo Bay who were sold outright to U.S. agents by "bounty hunters" -- human traffickers, actually -- in Afghanistan and Pakistan. As Murray points out, we now know that much of the "intelligence" used by Bush and Blair to manufacture war fever was sold by proven liars and shady operators willing to tell the warmongers what they wanted to hear. So when you hear Bush and Cheney -- and the pipsqueaking bootlickers in the blogosphere and mainstream press -- defending the use of torture, rendition, and lawlessness in the "fight against terrorism," remember that British bagman in Warsaw. For this is how the world really works. This is the true foundation of the malevolent edifices of fear and repression that Bush and Blair are building on the ruins of ancient liberties.

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      Video: Iraq oil protest turns deadly
      Jan. 1, 2006

      Jan. 1 - Security forces killed two people and wounded three when they fired on protesters in Rahinawa near the northern oil city of Kirkuk on Sunday, police said. Both U.S. and Iraqi troops were in the area at the time, but it was unclear who had fired on the demonstrators. The protesters -- angry over the lack of basic services in their town and a recent increase in fuel prices -- set fire to an oil company building, four cars and two petrol stations, police colonel Munes Abdullah said. He said two people had been shot dead by security forces. Footage shot by a Reuters cameraman on the scene showed young men marching down a street diving for cover after a barrage of gunshots rang out. The cameraman did not see any bodies but witnesses said as many as four people appeared to have been killed. The footage showed both Iraqi troops and U.S. humvees in the area, but the source of the gunfire could not be determined. The U.S. military had no immediate comment. The Iraqi government's decision last month to cut subsidies, which sent the price of gasoline and diesel up 200 percent, has sparked protests across the country.

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      Security forces kill 2 protesters in Iraq - police
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 00:00:00 GMT

      Security forces killed two people and wounded three when they fired on protesters in Rahinawa...Sunday... The protesters -- angry over the lack of basic services in their town and a recent increase in fuel prices -- set fire to an oil company building,

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      Iraq's power outages worsen - At least 24 killed in rash of attacks after post-vote lull
      January 1, 2006

      BAGHDAD, Iraq // Much of Iraq ushered in the new year under a near-blackout today as a week-old power crunch worsened across huge sections of northern and central Iraq. Baghdad's already sporadic electrical power was cut to about an hour yesterday, causing a legion of private generators to blare almost continuously and dampening the spirits of millions of Iraqis preparing for New Year's Eve, traditionally a joyous time of fireworks, family gatherings and public outings. "I filled the water tanks," said Firyal Fadil Kafaji, 40, a biology professor at Baghdad University. "Now we are trying to fill up the generator with gasoline because we are going to have a long night." Around the country, violence continued to flare after a brief lull after the Dec. 15 parliamentary elections. Attacks, including a mass murder with sectarian overtones south of Baghdad, left at least 24 dead. The U.S. military also reported the death of an American soldier from wounds sustained earlier, bringing its death toll in Iraq for 2005 near the previous year's level. Meanwhile, U.S. troops shivered in the cold during New Year's Eve celebrations with American Idol 3 finalist Diana DeGarmo and other entertainers at Camp Victory near Baghdad's airport. Iraq's electoral commission repeated a call for political groups to remove from their candidate lists 90 former members of Saddam Hussein's Baath Party before the agency issues final returns next week from the Dec. 15 parliamentary elections. A letter from President Bush lauded political developments in Iraq and Afghanistan, praising the efforts of U.S. troops in helping Iraqis exercise the right to vote three times during 2005 and helping the people of Afghanistan to also cast ballots. "We appreciate the brave men and women in uniform who protect our country and advance freedom around the world. We are grateful to their families for their support and sacrifice, and we pray for all those who have lost loved ones in freedom's cause," Bush said. A 16-year-old Florida teen who had traveled to Iraq on a journalistic whim continued his journey home. Shehnaz Hassan, Farris Hassan's sister, said that as of yesterday morning, her brother was in Kuwait City and was scheduled for a return flight tomorrow, although the family hoped to secure a flight today. The power outages added to the frustration building over last week's steep increase in gasoline prices. Baghdad residents waited as long as three hours in gas lines yesterday despite the higher prices. A national fuel shortage and fears of further cuts in gas subsidies apparently prompted the rush to fill up. Baghdad residents flocked to outdoor markets yesterday, stocking up on gifts and party supplies. But with temperatures in the 40s, they braced for a night without heat or light. "We are doing our best to clean the house without hot water," said medical assistant Diaa Hammed Doulimi, who was preparing to receive his parents for New Year's Eve at his middle-class west Baghdad home. "I have a very small generator that I turn on for two hours, as I can't afford to turn it on for more," Doulimi said. "I guess we're going to have to eat in the dark tonight." The causes of the power crisis were disputed. While central government officials blamed the worsening outages on foul weather in the southern ports, local power officials said strikes and threats of violence against truckers had shut down the giant refinery and generation plant at Baiji. As the government attempted to gain control of the energy crisis, a rash of killings marred the last day of the year. Gunmen raided a house near Iskandariyah, 30 miles south of Baghdad, yesterday afternoon, killing five members of a Sunni family, Iraqi authorities said. In the city of Khalis, 40 miles north of Baghdad, a bomb exploded about 10 a.m. yesterday, killing five people. Police said the attack appeared to target the local headquarters of one of the main Sunni political groups. A roadside bomb exploded near the Engineering College of Mustansariya in Baghdad just after 9 a.m., killing two Iraqi police and injuring six. Another roadside bomb in Baghdad killed five policemen, and a bomb targeting a convoy at a crossroad north of Baghdad killed two policemen and two civilians, authorities said. At 10 p.m., a mortar fell on a house in central Baghdad, killing a man and his son. A policeman was shot to death in Baghdad's Sadr City slum. Authorities also found five bodies in a stream about 30 miles southeast of Baghdad and another in a deserted area of Madaen. Also yesterday, a U.S. soldier died from wounds inflicted by a mortar attack, the military said. That put the American military death toll for the year at 841 - five short of 2004's total. The Associated Press contributed to this article.

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      Torture News for Sunday, January 1, 2005
      Sun, 01 Jan 2006 20:14:00 GMT

      I have been following how the blogosphere has been covering Craig Murray's revelations about the torture of innocents in this so called War on Terror. I have to hat tip Chris Floyd for this brilliant piece.By now, the world -- or at least the blogosphere -- has seen the documents released by former UK diplomat Craig Murray, proving that the Bush and Blair governments both knew that the "intelligence" they were receiving from Uzbekistan was the result of gruesome and agonizing tortures on thousands of innocent people. Bush and Blair knew this -- yet Bush continued to "render" his Terror War captives to Uzbekistan, and shower the nation's Stalinist dictator, Karimov, with gold, guns and public honor. And despite Blair's repeated and strenuous denials of any complicity in America's heinous practice of "rendition" (indeed, in one recent Parliamentary appearance, Blair pretended that he didn't even understand what the term meant), Murray's documents prove that Britain's leadership knew full well what was happening in Karimov's torture chambers. Yet, like their American counterparts, British officials not only condoned the Uzbek tortures, they also spent considerable energy in devising contorted -- and specious -- "justifications" for using the tainted fruits of these evil practices.And evil is the word for it. Murray, while still serving as UK ambassador to Uzbekistan, dug up proof that the tortures condoned by Bush and Blair included boiling prisoners to death, in addition to the traditional methods of pulling out fingernails, beating, starving, and raping. Nor were these refinements limited to the prisoners themselves -- their family members were also tortured to produce "confessions." One chilling case unearthed by Murray, who witnessed the Stalinist show trials mounted by Karimov's judicial goons, featured a peasant farmer who was forced to confess to extensive family links to Osama Bin Laden -- after seeing his children tortured before his eyes. At the show trial, the old man renounced his confession and exposed the torture of children -- and was promptly hustled away.All of this -- and much more -- Murray reported at the time to his superiors in London, and to his diplomatic colleagues from Europe and the United States. At every turn, he found either resigned complicity -- "What can we do? The US supports Karimov?" -- to outright embrace of torture from -- who else? -- Bush's own man in Tashkent, who told Murray that the "reduction of civil liberties" under Karimov was "no bad thing," since it was being done in the name of combatting Islamic extremism. Here we see the Bushist ethos in essence: Everything is permitted -- torture, murder, rape, kidnapping, aggression -- in the name of "fighting terrorism." Bush has of course brought this police state philosophy to America, as even the mainstream media is beginning to report.Murray's release of these documents -- an end run around the Blair government's threat to censor his whistle-blowing book on his tenure in Uzbekistan -- is yet another of a whole battery of smoking guns proving the pervasive criminality of the oh-so-Christian Coalition of Bush and Blair. Empire Burlesque's intrepid webmaster, RichardK, has been on top of this story quite literally from the beginning; he was among the first to receive Murray's documents upon their release this week, and the first to get them out into the blogosphere. He has compiled a detailed -- and growing -- compendium of stories and documents relating to Murray's revelations, which can be found here. You should avail yourself of Rich's remarkable labors with all speed.One very significant item unearthed by Rich is a speech Murray gave at York University last February. Here you will find a good overview of Murray's "journey through dark heat" in Tashkent. But there is also another telling revelation buried in the speech, almost as an aside, which does much to explain how the "intelligence" community -- which now appears to have swallowed the US-UK governments whole -- really works. Murray tells of his time as a diplomatic officer in Warsaw in the 1990s. He meets a Polish informant, who retails some hot gossip about something the Polish prime minister allegedly did. But Murray was at the event where the indiscretion supposedly took place, and knew that the story was false. The next day, Murray saw the same informant talking with another UK "diplomat" who was in fact an undercover MI6 man. "Low and behold the very next day I received on my desk in its striking bright red cover a piece of MI6 intelligence material containing this [false] story about the Polish Prime Minister," Murray told the students. The next time he saw the informant, he asked why he'd given the false information to the MI6 agent. The informant smiled and said, "Well, he paid me $8,000 for it."And that, dear friends, is the basis of much of the "intelligence" upon which the "War on Terror" is now based: grasping informants selling

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