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Fascism Today

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  • Jack Sarfatti
    bcc list sent to all the usual suspects This is a brilliant analysis to ponder as one looks in the mirror especially after the New Age Dotty.Commie Trash
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 5, 2002
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      bcc list sent to all the usual suspects

      This is a brilliant analysis to ponder as one looks in the mirror especially after the New Age Dotty.Commie Trash Crash! ;-)

      Stephen Schwartz wrote:

      > Let me explain something to you and all your correspondents about fascism and the misuse of the term.
      >
      > Fascism was a mass movement of the disfranchised and disgruntled middle classes in Europe, whose position was threatened by social instability: that of the Italian regime in the face of proletarian revolution after World War I, in the case of Mussolini's movement, and by the economic hardships in Germany following the collapse of the empire in the same war, in the case of Hitler.
      >
      > Konrad Heiden, an anti-Stalin leftist and the first great biographer of Hitler, wrote the earliest really useful social analysis of fascism. He described its beginning as a movement of "armed intellectuals," then becoming a movement of the "armed bohemia." Trotsky carried this analysis forward, but being blunter, described fascism as "the panicked radicalism of the ruined and crazed petit bourgeoisie," a movement composed of "human dust." (Of course Butt Packer thinks Heiden is a poor historian...)
      >
      > "Human dust." Let us examine what this term and "armed bohemia" mean.
      >
      > Beginning in the 19th century, with the exponential growth of the great European cities, interesting sociological developments are noticeable.
      >
      > Prior to then, society was composed of fairly stable classes: the aristocracy and church, the commercial bourgeoisie, the trade and craft productive class, the peasantry, and, weak but noticeable, the preindustrial wage-working class. Trade and craft workers were paid for their products; wage workers for their time.
      >
      > With the new rise of the cities, the decline of the old ruling and trade/craft classes, the growth of the commercial and protoindustrial bourgeoisie, ruination of the peasantry, and the continuing development of the protoindustrial working class are all visible. But other sociological phenomena are also perceptible. A new caste or class emerges -- the inferior section of the petit bourgeoisie, consisting of:
      >
      > aspiring state office holders;
      >
      > parasitical entrepreneurs unable to establish a firm place in the new economy;
      >
      > "overeducated" but mediocre placeseekers in the liberal professions, including academia and what we now call media;
      >
      > ruined trade and craft workers and peasants, devastated by the new economy;
      >
      > those who migrated from the country to the city and became demoralized, along with other declassed elements, by the pace and difficulty of urban life, to a point of unemployability, alcoholism, criminality, and mental incompetence.
      >
      > This vast array of unstable elements formed the bohemian class in the cities.
      >
      > They seldom had fixed jobs. They were filled with resentment at their failure to establish themselves in society. Some of them were also enraged at the social and economic changes that had deprived them of their place in society. But most of them just hated the position they were in; they could not reach the point of analyzing their predicament. So they turned to conspiratorial explanations.
      >
      > Sound familiar? No stable profession or job? B../D.../P.../...berg. 50 years old without a hope for the future. Filled with anger? The same group of disgruntled nobodies.
      >
      > Human dust.
      >
      > It is the special characteristic of this class -- the urban bohemia -- that it cannot think straight. It always seeks a scapegoat for its failures, and its thinking is always conspiratorial.
      >
      > The declassed bohemia of 19th century Catholic Europe blamed its misfortunes on a Jewish-Masonic conspiracy.
      >
      > The declassed bohemia of post-1918 Italy blamed its misfortunes on the "antipatriotic" socialists.
      >
      > The declassed bohemia of post-1918 Germany blamed its misfortunes on a Jewish-Masonic-Bolshevik conspiracy.
      >
      > The declassed elements of Spain in the 1930s blamed its misfortunes on a Jewish-Masonic-Communist-anarchist conspiracy.
      >
      > The declassed bohemia of collapsing Serboslavia blamed its misfortunes on a Catholic-Muslim-NATO conspiracy. The sociological profile is exact: aspirants to employment in the raggedy-assed Tito bureaucracy, wannabe entrepreneurs who become Belgrade mafiosi; "overeducated" placeseekers in the liberal professions, including academia and what we now call media -- Yugoslavia had more unemployed film critics than any country in history, and the Serbian press was and is as bad as it was a century ago; ruined trade and craft workers and peasants -- the Balkans had a hell of a lot of these; those demoralized by the pace and difficulty of urban life to a point of unemployability, alcoholism, or mental incompetence -- the Balkans were also full of these.
      >
      > There is even a declassed "bohemian" stratum in the Islamic countries -- indeed, it is enormous. In some countries they are known as the "teahouse class." This class consists of those who fail to gain state employment, or to start businesses, or who have too much education and no prospects, or whose peasant holdings or trade and craft work have collapsed, or who cannot contend with urban life. And of course they blame their misfortunes on the Jews and America.
      >
      > The declassed bohemia of North Beach blames its misfortunes on the CIA-Nazi conspiracy, and occasionally takes up the cudgels for Serboslav or Islamic conspiratorialism. The teahouse class in Cairo = the coffeehouse class in San Francisco.
      >
      > The situation has been much aggravated by the rise of the universities as, essentially, glamorous diploma mills -- the mass fabrication of doctorates, etc. -- and by the incredible overexpansion of the state bureaucracies worldwide after 1945.
      >
      > .....o is a classic example of the semivagabond whose entire life is summed up in a job checking ....limits for a bogus state institution. There were millions of these types in Imperial Germany and Austria-Hungary. They had no real education, no serious profession, but they got themselves parasitical posts in a ridiculously overgrown state administration. Look at Hitler's father, the petty customs collector. These jobs don't even exist today. ...
      >
      > Dildinski is there among the lackeys of the failed entepreneurs. No stable profession, but marginal jobs for marginal enterprises that bloom in periods of speculative accumulation and then collapse. Millions of such people were thrown out of work in Germany under Versailles. They marched right into the Nazi party.
      >
      > The Bay Area is loaded with overeducated placeseekers; its leftism is really fascism.
      >
      > All of these types are filled with resentment. Resentment that they do not have better jobs, that they are not recognized for their genius, etc. The junior version is John W. Lindh.
      >
      > A century ago the socialist labor movement offered an alternative to all this: the industrial workers had a productive position in society, and they embraced a rational, nonconspiratorial radicalism. But that class no longer exists, and as Franz Borkenau noted in the 1930s, German Communism turned from organizing the workers to competing with the Nazis for votes from the armed bohemia. That was the end of that, and it explains why the Commies of today have become fascists -- defending Serbia, for example.
      >
      > The classic example of the "intellectual" as human dust: Hirschman.
      >
      > I fear the real Orwell/PKDick future will consist of a handful of serious professionals -- those able to establish themselves in "letters and science" -- surrounded by a vast, limitless human desert of fakes, poseurs, conspiratorialists, perverts, failures, losers, and scum.
      >
      > UFOmania is another example of this phenomenon: the declassed Americans and Europeans baffled and besieged by the world look for yet another conspiratorial escape hatch. Faced with too much science for them to understand, they flee into pseudoscience.
      >
      > Not a pretty picture. The widow McVeigh and Dildinski do more to establish fascism in America with every cappuccino they drink than an army of a million Byelorussian exiles, bankrolled by General Motors, General Mills, and General Foods, and commanded by General MacArthur, could ever have accomplished.
      >
      > Stephen Schwartz

      --
      "What I cannot create. I do not understand." Richard Feynman
    • Jack Sarfatti
      We need to distinguish legitimate UFO research such as yours and NIDS from the huge amount of disinformation and misinformation on the subject from the human
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 6, 2002
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        We need to distinguish legitimate UFO research such as yours and NIDS from the huge amount of disinformation and misinformation on the subject from the "human dust" that Schwartz describes. The "UFO" issue is complex and is part of a psy ops from different states and groups as is "esp". It's not science as usual but involves politics and intelligence matters.

        bruce maccabee wrote:

        > Ayatollah(?) Schwartz wrote
        > >> The classic example of the "intellectual" as human dust: Hirschman.
        > >
        > > I fear the real Orwell/PKDick future will consist of a handful of serious
        > professionals -- those able to establish themselves in "letters and
        > science" -- surrounded by a vast, limitless human desert of fakes, poseurs,
        > conspiratorialists, perverts, failures, losers, and scum.
        > >
        > > UFOmania is another example of this phenomenon: the declassed Americans
        > and Europeans baffled and besieged by the world look for yet another
        > conspiratorial escape hatch. Faced with too much science for them to
        > understand, they flee into pseudoscience.
        > >
        >

        We see this with for example Rense.com. It also wrecked Joe Firmage as I witnessed first hand.

        >
        >
        > Regardless of the impact of UFO sightings on fascist tendencies of
        > witnesses and others ("hearers of the word,")
        > let me just make it clear that the observational evidence is not a result
        > of wishful thinking by religious or political "nuts."
        >
        > How the observational evidence is USED by religious or political nuts
        > (psychoceramics or "cracked pots") is, however,
        > related to the arguments raised here. All one has to do is note how UFO
        > sightings/observations have been embraced by hopeful new agers (space
        > brothers and all that).

        Yes, that's part of what Steve is alluding to I think. Also note how UFO mania has been hijacked by Danny Sheehan as part of his anti-Bush anti-militarization of space. First Danny hooks up with Steve Greer and is now with Carol Rosin who has apparently hoodwinked Arthur C Clarke and Ed Mitchell into Danny's "bait and switch" shell game in which

        Peace with ET => US Naked and Defenseless in Space

        --
        "What I cannot create. I do not understand." Richard Feynman
      • Jack Sarfatti
        Done via bcc ... -- What I cannot create. I do not understand. Richard Feynman
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 10, 2002
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          Done via bcc

          Stephen Schwartz wrote:

          > Please distribute this to the morons who are engaged with Dildinski on the matter of so called corporate fascism.
          >
          > A few postings ago one of the doofus posts included a slur against James Burnham, comrade of Leon Trotsky, Bill Buckley, and Lawry Chickering, and mentor to myself.
          >
          > If these illiterates knew anything, they would know that the most intelligent criticism in English of the overgrowth of the state in the 20th century was a book by Burnham called THE MANAGERIAL REVOLUTION. This book came out in 1941 and very brilliantly described the similarities between fascism, Stalinism, and the New Deal, not as repressive systems, but as varying forms of a single social development: the rise of the management and administrative class to power. It was a bestseller in its time but has been relegated to the void because Burnham became a "right-winger."
          >
          > If you want to understand the necessary critique of the state power in our time, you have to begin with Burnham. Jack, here is something that should really interest you: Burnham wrote a book called THE MACHIAVELLIANS in which he analyzes the great philosophers of state power, Machiavelli, Vilfredo Pareto, Gaetano Mosca, Robert Michels, and Georges Sorel. A reviewer on Amazon.com describes them as "five of the most scientifically rigorous of all political thinkers." The book is hard to find but you could try alibris.com, which has out of print books.
          >
          > Another irony of this is that the ranting against the corporate state indulged in by the doofuses is much closer to the anti-big-government views of conservative Republicans than to any traditional leftist.
          >
          > IMO -- and my opinion, unlike that of Dildinski & Co., is based on 35 years of serious analysis, writing, and publication -- the three most significant political philosophers of modern times are Marx, Kropotkin, and Ribert Michels.
          >
          > Marx grasped that under certain conditions the working class could take power away from the bourgeoisie. It didn't happen the way he expected, but the insight as to the potential was important.
          >
          > Kropotkin explained why it didn't happen the way Marx predicted: because the radical left parties would seek power for themselves, not for their working-class constituents.
          >
          > Michels analyzed this power-seeking as part of an inherent social tendency toward oligarchy.
          >
          > People interested in why our society functions in the way it does, especially the apparently constant increase of state control (I say only "apparently" because I don't think it's immutable) should be reading these works, not the scribblings of coffeehouse panhandlers.
          >
          > Stephen Schwartz
          >

          --
          "What I cannot create. I do not understand." Richard Feynman
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