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Re: [Ira-Einhorn] some personal recollections of Ira

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  • pantheon
    I agree, innocence cannot be proved and this is Ira s song, no doubt. However, he was FOUND guilty and all evidence was against him and pointed to him as a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 24, 2007
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      I agree, innocence cannot be proved and this is Ira's song,  no doubt.  However, he was FOUND guilty and all evidence was against him and pointed to him as a sole and only person with  motive. A mummified corpse was in the trunk in his house; the floor was rotten under the trunk from being there for a long time; there was a stench in his appt.;  he had a quarrel with the victim; he asked friends to dump the heavy trunk few days after disappearance of the victim; he glorified   idea of killing his lover in his diary; he threatened  and choked other women in the past; he inquired his colleagues about efficient methods of poisoning; he skipped the bail, yet had the best attorney on his side; he used women  for money and support; he lied, stole passports... If we are to reject  this  as evidence  of guilt, then we may as well let free many other killers on  similar grounds.  
      I think Ira cares more for his phony self image than truth, so he may never  confess and will lie to the very bitter end.  Like most psychopatic killers.
      This does not mean that I do not have pity on him.
      Anna
       
       
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2007 11:18 AM
      Subject: Re: [Ira-Einhorn] some personal recollections of Ira

      Dear, sweet, gullible, naive Anna,
      Innocence can't be proven. That's why the burden of proof rests with the prosecution. That's why defendants produce alibis rather than proofs of innocence. That's why it is a violation of law for the prosecution to withhold exculpatory evidence, as the DA did in Ira's case.
      But don't let that bother you. I have the feeling that if someone stepped forward and confessed to Holly's murder, you would claim that Ira put them up to it. In other words, you are right because you are right and know you are right. Nothing else matters.
      Jim

      At 10:05 PM 1/23/2007, you wrote:

      Does it matter if one knows how to spell a murderer's name?  In fact, remembering  it is a bad thing, as these people should be forgotten and their names erased from all records.
      Even you were innocently charged, it still does not mean that  Ira is too.  Judging by the fact that you are free, obviously you were able to present enough evidence to prove your innocence. Can Ira do the same?   Also, if  you study profiles of psychotic murderers, there is always a history and and tracable evolution from abuser to a killer.  And Ira fits very well this profile.    He knows the truth  too. But he is a coward and will deny it to the end.
       
      Anna
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: redemp@...
      To: pantheon
      Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 10:22 PM
      Subject: Re: [Ira-Einhorn] some personal recollections of Ira

      At least spell "Gacey's" name correctly. Need I bother to mention that one was a serial murderer, convicted without a shred of doubt? No, that won't bother you, Anna, because for you, apples = oranges.

      At 05:19 PM 1/23/2007, you wrote:

      yeah... but it says nothing about Ira's  ability to murder.
      I think many people also thought that Gancy was very lovable guy.
      I believe  that  Ira  did kill Holly, however I have  hope that one day he will have change of heart and admit it.
      Then,  and only then, his  inborn goodnes can shine without any blemish.

       

       
      Anna
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: David Crockett Williams
      To: ira-einhorn@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:08 PM
      Subject: [Ira-Einhorn] some personal recollections of Ira


      -----Original Message-----
      Sent: Sunday, February 19, 2006 8:06 AM
      To: David Crockett Williams
      Subject: Re: some personal recollections of Ira
      David:
      You can post this to his list for public record without either my
      name or my email address. I'm extremely busy and I have not had any
      interest in Ira's case other than following the extradition
      proceedings. I know nothing about his philosophy and at this point in
      my life, I'm 68, I'm not interested in taking the short time
      remaining me to learn about new theories and philosophies, that is,
      new to me.
      However, as I said, feel free to post the content I sent anywhere you
      want.
      M...
      On Feb 19, 2006, at 4:08 AM, David Crockett Williams wrote:
      > Hi M,, thanks for the recollections. If you had been
      > in court to testify just this little bit, the judge would not
      > have been able to get away with what he did, saying Ira
      > was just a fake intellectual type who reads the flyleaf
      > of a coffee table book on a subject and then makes out
      > to everyone like he is an expert when he is just a con.
      > This is a continuing discreditation of the psychotronics
      > ("not in his dictionary" judge said) and other weird psi
      > stuff coverup still going on looks like.
      >
      > This the judge said in a press interview he called after
      > the verdict with the jury!
      >
      > A deposition of your below might help in Ira's appeal
      > filings and Jim cc above can mail to Ira and communicate
      > with you by email in Costa Rica if Ira wants to communicate
      > with you?
      >
      > Is it ok I post this to his list for public record? with or without
      > your name and/or email?
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > David
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: notify@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Saturday, February 18, 2006 12:25 PM
      > To: David Crockett Williams
      > Subject: Re: pardon me, a Philadelphia connection, CLU, Unicorn
      >
      > I have some personal recollections of Ira when he and
      > I were both at Penn in the early 60s.
      >
      > He was a grad student and I was still an undergrad
      > (though older than most). Ira and I were part of a
      > small group of friends at Penn. This was a few years
      > before Ira became so well known as a "guru" as he's
      > often called. I didn't know him then for I had already
      > left Penn and was at Vanderbilt in grad school.
      >
      > At that time Ira was living with Morris Peckham,
      > a very well-known English professor at Penn.
      >
      > The two things I remember most about Ira are,
      > first, that he was reading literary criticism
      > at the astounding rate of about a volume a day
      > for much of the time I knew him and could
      > talk about his reading in a brilliant fashion.
      >
      > The second thing I remember was a trip he and
      > I took to Boston one weekend. He knew a
      > couple of girls there who were students and
      > they had told him that we could crash there if
      > we came up.
      >
      > That night, just before we went to sleep, I told
      > the girls and him that I'd better go down and
      > find somewhere else to park the car because
      > of a sign I had seen concerning parking on that
      > street in the morning. Ira and the girls said
      > that people always parked there in the morning
      > and not to worry. Well, of course, when we got
      > up the next morning my car had already been
      > towed away.
      >
      > A couple of days later Ira and I were headed
      > back to Philadelphia on the Jersey Turnpike
      > when my car, a 56 Plymouth, broke down.
      > We got towed to the nearest service station
      > (lot of towing on that trip). They said that
      > it'd be about 2 hours before the car was fixed
      > because they had to have a part sent over from
      > somewhere.
      >
      > Ira decided that he couldn't wait and thus left
      > me there and hitched his way back to Philadelphia.
      > It didn't bother me much at all. Almost everyone
      > in that small group of friends was brilliant, far
      > more intelligent than I, and the most brilliant
      > were usually not very sensitive to others.
      >
      > I always thought that was a small price to pay to
      > be able to spend so much time with people like that.
      >
      > M.
      >
      >



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