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2/20 article on SB 182

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  • Dan Johnson-Weinberger
    Here s an article from February on SB 182. Any luck lobbying other legislators on it? Also, can someone volunteer to do some outreach to the Boone County Clerk
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 15, 2001
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      Here's an article from February on SB 182. Any luck lobbying other
      legislators on it?

      Also, can someone volunteer to do some outreach to the Boone County
      Clerk Wendy Noren? She needs to know that lots of voting equipment
      can handle IRV (she claims that no equipment can) including many
      optical scanners that are used in Missouri.

      Thanks,
      Dan Johnson-Weinberger
      Center for Voting and Democracy

      THE KANSAS CITY STAR

      Tuesday, February 20, 2001
      Section: METRO
      Edition: METROPOLITAN
      Page: B4


      BILL WOULD REQUIRE RUNOFF IN ABSENCE OF MAJORITY

      TIM HOOVER
      THE KANSAS CITY STAR
      JEFFERSON CITY - A bill in the Missouri Senate would stop third-
      party "spoiler" candidates by requiring runoffs after elections in
      which no one has received at least 50 percent of the vote.

      Sen. John Loudon, a Ballwin Republican, touted his bill Monday before
      a Senate committee as a way to keep third-party candidates
      from "thwarting majority rule."


      The bill would require runoffs in primary and general elections for
      any federal or statewide office when no candidate has received a
      majority of the vote. In such a situation, the governor would order a
      special election between the top two candidates no later than 30 days
      after the first election.
      Loudon said third-party candidates such as Ross Perot and Ralph Nader
      had been spoilers in the last three presidential elections, resulting
      in presidents who never achieved a majority of the popular vote.

      In Missouri's last gubernatorial election, neither Democrat Bob
      Holden nor Republican Jim Talent received 50 percent of the vote,
      with several third-party candidates splitting the remainder. Holden,
      who had 49 percent of the vote, defeated Talent by less than a 1
      percent margin.

      "The more candidates you get in the race, the more our system plays
      to the extreme," Loudon said.

      Loudon said he also would favor adding a so-called "instant runoff"
      system to the bill. Under the system, voters would pick their top two
      candidates on a ballot.

      "If your first candidate fails to win on the first ballot, they go
      down and start counting your second choice," Loudon said.

      He said similar instant runoff proposals are under consideration in
      Alaska, New Mexico, Vermont, Washington and California.

      Sen. Stephen Stoll, a Festus Democrat, questioned whether a runoff
      should be used for presidential elections.

      "Abraham Lincoln received 39 percent of the vote in his first
      election," Stoll said. "There is a reason why we have third-party
      candidates."

      Missouri senators did not address how such a state law might conform
      with federal election laws. No vote was taken on the bill Monday.

      Sen. Anita Yeckel, a St. Louis Republican, asked if voters would be
      able to comprehend such a system.

      "Do you think the voters of Miami-Dade County could work with this?"
      Yeckel joked, referring to the controversy surrounding the 2000
      presidential vote in Florida.

      Loudon, though, said voters could be counted on to make it work.

      But Boone County Clerk Wendy Noren, testifying against the bill,
      wasn't so sure.

      Noren said she has trouble getting voters to understand simple things
      such as completely filling in an oval on a paper ballot.

      Then there would be the expense of such an operation, especially a
      separate election after a primary or general election, she said. The
      state would have to provide more appropriations for counties to be
      able to hold these extra elections, she said.

      Noren said there is no technology existing in the United States
      capable of having an instant runoff.

      She also said there is a more philosophical reason for not holding
      runoffs.

      "A lot of these proposals are kind of feel-good things so people
      don't really have to make a hard decision."

      The bill number is S.B. 182.

      To reach Tim Hoover, Jefferson City reporter, call 1-(573)-634-3565
      or send e-mail to thoover@....
    • Devin M. Scherubel
      Do you have the documentation that would be used in convincing Wendy? -- devin On 4/15/01 8:36 PM, Dan Johnson-Weinberger ... Devin M. Scherubel Network
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 18, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Do you have the documentation that would be used in convincing Wendy?

        -- devin

        On 4/15/01 8:36 PM, "Dan Johnson-Weinberger"
        <proportionalrepresentation@...> wrote:

        > Here's an article from February on SB 182. Any luck lobbying other
        > legislators on it?
        >
        > Also, can someone volunteer to do some outreach to the Boone County
        > Clerk Wendy Noren? She needs to know that lots of voting equipment
        > can handle IRV (she claims that no equipment can) including many
        > optical scanners that are used in Missouri.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Dan Johnson-Weinberger
        > Center for Voting and Democracy
        >
        > THE KANSAS CITY STAR
        >
        > Tuesday, February 20, 2001
        > Section: METRO
        > Edition: METROPOLITAN
        > Page: B4
        >
        >
        > BILL WOULD REQUIRE RUNOFF IN ABSENCE OF MAJORITY
        >
        > TIM HOOVER
        > THE KANSAS CITY STAR
        > JEFFERSON CITY - A bill in the Missouri Senate would stop third-
        > party "spoiler" candidates by requiring runoffs after elections in
        > which no one has received at least 50 percent of the vote.
        >
        > Sen. John Loudon, a Ballwin Republican, touted his bill Monday before
        > a Senate committee as a way to keep third-party candidates
        > from "thwarting majority rule."
        >
        >
        > The bill would require runoffs in primary and general elections for
        > any federal or statewide office when no candidate has received a
        > majority of the vote. In such a situation, the governor would order a
        > special election between the top two candidates no later than 30 days
        > after the first election.
        > Loudon said third-party candidates such as Ross Perot and Ralph Nader
        > had been spoilers in the last three presidential elections, resulting
        > in presidents who never achieved a majority of the popular vote.
        >
        > In Missouri's last gubernatorial election, neither Democrat Bob
        > Holden nor Republican Jim Talent received 50 percent of the vote,
        > with several third-party candidates splitting the remainder. Holden,
        > who had 49 percent of the vote, defeated Talent by less than a 1
        > percent margin.
        >
        > "The more candidates you get in the race, the more our system plays
        > to the extreme," Loudon said.
        >
        > Loudon said he also would favor adding a so-called "instant runoff"
        > system to the bill. Under the system, voters would pick their top two
        > candidates on a ballot.
        >
        > "If your first candidate fails to win on the first ballot, they go
        > down and start counting your second choice," Loudon said.
        >
        > He said similar instant runoff proposals are under consideration in
        > Alaska, New Mexico, Vermont, Washington and California.
        >
        > Sen. Stephen Stoll, a Festus Democrat, questioned whether a runoff
        > should be used for presidential elections.
        >
        > "Abraham Lincoln received 39 percent of the vote in his first
        > election," Stoll said. "There is a reason why we have third-party
        > candidates."
        >
        > Missouri senators did not address how such a state law might conform
        > with federal election laws. No vote was taken on the bill Monday.
        >
        > Sen. Anita Yeckel, a St. Louis Republican, asked if voters would be
        > able to comprehend such a system.
        >
        > "Do you think the voters of Miami-Dade County could work with this?"
        > Yeckel joked, referring to the controversy surrounding the 2000
        > presidential vote in Florida.
        >
        > Loudon, though, said voters could be counted on to make it work.
        >
        > But Boone County Clerk Wendy Noren, testifying against the bill,
        > wasn't so sure.
        >
        > Noren said she has trouble getting voters to understand simple things
        > such as completely filling in an oval on a paper ballot.
        >
        > Then there would be the expense of such an operation, especially a
        > separate election after a primary or general election, she said. The
        > state would have to provide more appropriations for counties to be
        > able to hold these extra elections, she said.
        >
        > Noren said there is no technology existing in the United States
        > capable of having an instant runoff.
        >
        > She also said there is a more philosophical reason for not holding
        > runoffs.
        >
        > "A lot of these proposals are kind of feel-good things so people
        > don't really have to make a hard decision."
        >
        > The bill number is S.B. 182.
        >
        > To reach Tim Hoover, Jefferson City reporter, call 1-(573)-634-3565
        > or send e-mail to thoover@....
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > InstantRunoffMO-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >


        Devin M. Scherubel
        Network Support Coordinator, Heartwood
        PO Box 7653, Columbia, MO 65205
        phone: (573) 999-5790
        fax: (573) 443-5225
        devin@...
        http://www.heartwood.org

        "At the top of American society is a possessing class richer, in terms both
        of wealth and income, than any in history. The richest one percent of
        American households have amassed more than $10 trillion in wealth¬č10 million
        million dollars¬čabout 40 percent of the total national wealth. The combined
        net worth of these multimillionaires is greater than the total wealth of the
        bottom 95 percent of the population."
        (http://www.indymedia.org/display.php3?article_id=32809)
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