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Re: "Nice to delete you" - the etiquette of social networking

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  • Emily
    Are you interested in discussing how nonprofits can use social networking sites? If so, you might want to join the N-TEN Affinity group I created called
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 30, 2006
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      Are you interested in discussing how nonprofits can use social networking sites? If so, you might want to join the N-TEN Affinity group I created called SocialNetworking. It's located at http://groups.nten.org/group.htm?mode=home&igid=5747 and you must be a member of the site to join the group.


      Emily
      http://nonprofitblogexchange.blogspot.com
      http://eweinb04.blogspot.com
    • karl brown
      I think social networking software has great potential, especially for connecting networks of nonprofits. Personally I have used linkedin extensively, but
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 1, 2006
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        I think social networking software has great potential, especially for connecting networks of nonprofits. Personally I have used linkedin extensively, but friendster much less so. I find that for business connections, it is much easier to say "I am a colleague" of someone, versus saying "I am your friend".

        Danah Boyd wrote a very interesting piece on this a few years back called "Autistic Social Software" - you can read it here: http://www.danah.org/papers/Supernova2004.html

        a relevant quote:

        "What does this mean for sociable media? We do not understand how social life really works. Thus, we make crude approximations for it and we make crude approximations for human psychology too. In the tech world, we often make these assumptions based on material like science fiction and pop psychology because we pride ourselves from being removed from an understanding of social life. Simplistic or mechanical understandings of social life are exactly what emerges from autism. From an autistic perspective, social life can and must be programmatically and algorithmically processed and understood on simplistic categorizable levels. The nuanced relationships that people regularly manage in everyday life are boiled down to segmented possibilities. When we teach autistic children to engage in social life, we teach them things like facial expressions. We tell them that a smile means goodness; that a frown should be concerning. Step by step, we dissect social affect and try to formalize it so that these kids can understand the world. This is also what we do with computers. How different is this from asking "Are you my friend, yes or no?""

        --

        LinkedIn is also great for finding contacts at companies you are interested in working with, and really shows off the "Strength of Weak Ties"

        (http://www.si.umich.edu/~rfrost/courses/SI110/readings/In_Out_and_Beyond/Granovetter.pdf#search=%22the%20strength%20of%20weak%20ties%22) Sometimes, the people you know the least end up having the most useful connections. What is great about linkedin is it lets you mine this information, without bothering your friends and colleagues with emails and address book searches every time you'd like to find someone working at X.

        --

        Karl Brown

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • vhalfpenny
        I like the idea of useing the term buddy. Friend is something important. A friend is someone you can call at 2:00AM. Also, as big a fan I am of social
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 2, 2006
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          I like the idea of useing the term buddy. Friend is something
          important. A friend is someone you can call at 2:00AM. Also, as big
          a fan I am of social networking, I do worry that people will forget
          that face to face meetings really are what build up many
          relationships.

          Victoria



          -----original message-----
          >> For the last few years, I've been thinking a lot about how nonprofits are (and should be) using online social networking tools. The Boston Globe just ran an article on the more general topic of the emerging etiquette of online social networking, and ended up quoting me a little bit: <http://www.boston.com/ae/media/articles/2006/09/30/nice_to_delete_yo u/>. I'd be interested in the thoughts of other members of the group, > because I think that social networking can be very powerful for the > nonprofit sector, if we make appropriate use of it.>>
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