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RE: (Information Systems Forum) Domains

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  • Rajib Momen
    Your instincts are right. There are no laws involved with the usage of .com, .net, .org, .ca, .us, etc. top-level domains. You can register them for any kind
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 31, 2003
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      Your instincts are right. There are no laws involved with the usage of .com,
      .net, .org, .ca, .us, etc. top-level domains. You can register them for any
      kind of use. It is just a common practice for non-profits to use .org domain
      names.

      There's only a few TLDs that have required guidelines and eligibility
      requirements, like .edu (http://www.educause.edu/edudomain) and .gov.

      Best regards,
      Rajib Momen

      President, Director of I.T.
      Boston Computing Network
      http://www.bostoncomputing.net



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Mark Warnick [mailto:mark@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 1:56 PM
      To: Information_Systems_Forum@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: (Information Systems Forum) Domains

      I have a very strange question. I am in no way a computer guru, so this
      may seem a stupid question. I was wondering if there is any laws, or if it
      is just a general consensus that .org is supposed to be used for charities
      only?
      I was asked this question by a group that is using the ".com" domain
      registration. My instinct tells me that it is not a law, but a commonly
      accepted practice that .org was used for charities. Can anyone shed some
      light on this??, ... Mark
    • Don Cameron
      Hi Mark, .org is an abbreviation of organization - a .org domain holder can be an organization of any type, not necessarily charitable. There are no laws
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 1, 2004
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        Hi Mark,

        .org is an abbreviation of "organization" - a .org domain holder can be an
        organization of any type, not necessarily charitable. There are no laws
        governing domain name allocations - delegations and determining eligibility
        is the responsibility of each countries top-level domain management
        authority.

        Rgds, Don
      • Stan Hamnett
        Maybe this will somewhat help you with the answer to your question. From my experience of working with domain names over the past several years only certain
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 1, 2004
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          Maybe this will somewhat help you with the answer to your question. From my
          experience of working with domain names over the past several years only
          certain ones have restricted use as you can see below. I just completed the
          Domain Name registration of a State - Wide non-profit organization, the .org
          extension was not available so I had to go with a .net extension.

          http://icann.org/general/glossary.htm Click on this line to see more of the
          same type of information below.

          gTLD - Generic Top Level Domain

          Most TLDs with three or more characters are referred to as "generic" TLDs,
          or "gTLDs". They can be subdivided into two types, "sponsored" TLDs (sTLDs)
          and "unsponsored TLDs (uTLDs), as described in more detail below.

          In the 1980s, seven gTLDs (.com, .edu, .gov, .int, .mil, .net, and .org)
          were created. Domain names may be registered in three of these (.com, .net,
          and .org) without restriction; the other four have limited purposes.

          Over the next twelve years, various discussions occurred concerning
          additional gTLDs, leading to the selection in November 2000 of seven new
          TLDs for introduction. These were introduced in 2001 and 2002. Four of the
          new TLDs (.biz, .info, .name, and .pro) are unsponsored. The other three new
          TLDs (.aero, .coop, and .museum) are sponsored.

          Generally speaking, an unsponsored TLD operates under policies established
          by the global Internet community directly through the ICANN process, while a
          sponsored TLD is a specialized TLD that has a sponsor representing the
          narrower community that is most affected by the TLD. The sponsor thus
          carries out delegated policy-formulation responsibilities over many matters
          concerning the TLD.

          A Sponsor is an organization to which is delegated some defined ongoing
          policy-formulation authority regarding the manner in which a particular
          sponsored TLD is operated. The sponsored TLD has a Charter, which defines
          the purpose for which the sponsored TLD has been created and will be
          operated. The Sponsor is responsible for developing policies on the
          delegated topics so that the TLD is operated for the benefit of a defined
          group of stakeholders, known as the Sponsored TLD Community, that are most
          directly interested in the operation of the TLD. The Sponsor also is
          responsible for selecting the registry operator and to varying degrees for
          establishing the roles played by registrars and their relationship with the
          registry operator. The Sponsor must exercise its delegated authority
          according to fairness standards and in a manner that is representative of
          the Sponsored TLD Community.


          Stan Hamnett, M.A., ICADC,CMI

          Internet: http://hamnettconsulting.com

          email: hamnetts@...

          Cell: .520.975.2724

          Fax: 520.844.1119





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michelle Murrain
          ... .com, .net have a different registrar than .org domains. The .org domain registry is: http://www.pir.org/ But you can still register a .org domain at
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 1, 2004
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            At 1:56 PM -0500 12/31/03, Mark Warnick wrote:
            > I have a very strange question. I am in no way a computer guru, so this
            >may seem a stupid question. I was wondering if there is any laws, or if it
            >is just a general consensus that .org is supposed to be used for charities
            >only?
            > I was asked this question by a group that is using the ".com" domain
            >registration. My instinct tells me that it is not a law, but a commonly
            >accepted practice that .org was used for charities. Can anyone shed some
            >light on this??, ... Mark

            .com, .net have a different registrar than .org domains. The .org
            domain registry is: http://www.pir.org/ But you can still register a
            .org domain at pretty much any registry service (like network
            solutions, godaddy, register.com etc.)

            However, there are no rules or laws regarding domain registration as
            there are in some other countries - just convention, as you've
            mentioned above. I know of nonprofits that have registered all
            domains (i.e. their_name.org, .net and .com) and for profits that
            have done the same. I know of nonprofits that only use .com or .net.
            It's widely varied, and to a some extent, I think the convention has
            broken down.
            --
            .Michelle

            --------------------------
            Michelle Murrain
            mmurrain at dbdes dot com
            413-253-2874 ph
            413-222-6350 cell
            413-825-0288 fax
            AIM:pearlbear0 Y!:pearlbear9 ICQ:129250575
            SMS: 4132226350 at messaging dot sprintpcs dot com
          • joshfreedman
            ... consensus that .org is supposed to be used for charities only? This has been a topic for lively debate within the webhost community over the last two
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 1, 2004
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              Mark Warnick wrote:

              > I was wondering if there is any laws, or if it is just a general
              consensus that .org is supposed to be used for charities only?

              This has been a topic for lively debate within the webhost community
              over the last two years, regarding returning it to more purely non-
              profit use. While you can register for .ORG through various
              registries, the .ORG top-level-domain (TLD) is actually managed by
              http://www.publicinterestregistry.org/. They took over as of
              1/1/2003 (ironically). It looks like there aren't rules ... yet.
              There is an effort to "purify" .ORG to be non-profit focused.

              More information than you may want to know:
              http://www.domainhandbook.com/org.html

              Josh Freedman
              More Traffic, More Sales
              Freedman Consulting
              www.joshfreedman.com
              206-355-6838
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