Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Indo-Eurasia] Re: Agamemnon's handle-bar mustache

Expand Messages
  • John C. Huntington
    Long ago and far away, remember reading that the Romans pulled facial hair (is this true?) John
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 28, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Long ago and far away, remember reading that the Romans pulled facial
      hair (is this true?)

      John


      On Feb 28, 2007, at 7:51 PM, Victor H. Mair wrote:

      > Thank you, Sarah, for so much detailed information about mustaches
      > among
      > the ancient Celts and excellent illustrations depicting them. With all
      > that shaving and shaping of the facial hair going on, I've often
      > wondered how the ancients did it. With the sharpest knife they had
      > around? I think I heard somewhere about scraping with sharp, broken
      > shells, but I may just be imagining that. In any event, I cut myself
      > often enough with safety razors, so the ancients must have bloodied
      > their faces quite a bit while shaving with less evolved instruments.
      > Does anyone know how they actually did it?
      >
      > Incidentally, some of Genghis Khans' early ambassadors were humiliated
      > by the Arabs in Kwarezmia by having their beards removed and faces
      > mutilated. Maybe they just did a particularly bad job of shaving them!
      >
      > Victor
      >
      > bhmsympatico wrote:
      > >
      > > Steve,
      > > Diodorus first mentions the practice of shaving amongst the Celts
      > and
      > > notes that the nobles wore mustaches. The handlebar mustache was
      > > present but the most common form was the down turn mustache as
      > seem on
      > > the bust of a Gallic chieftain, 1st century A.D. and the
      > sculpture of
      > > The Dying Gaul They sometimes wore a thin, shaved beard under the
      > lip
      > > (Clonycavan Man) like the thin, triangular beard on the Agamemnon
      > > Mask. The mask has two shared features with other European cultures:
      > > 1. shaving and a handlebar mustache and 2. a stylized graphic method
      > > of depicting the face.
    • Francesco Brighenti
      Dear John, What a hairy question you have posed! ... Yes, that s true. Plucking the facial hair with the use of a volsella ( a pair of tweezers , from Lat.
      Message 2 of 29 , Mar 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear John,

        What a "hairy" question you have posed!

        --- In Indo-Eurasian_research@yahoogroups.com, "John C. Huntington"
        <Huntington.2@...> wrote:

        > Long ago and far away, remember reading that the Romans pulled
        > facial hair (is this true?)

        Yes, that's true. Plucking the facial hair with the use of a
        volsella ('a pair of tweezers', from Lat. vols-, past participle
        root of vellere 'to pluck') was one of the shaving methods resorted
        to in classical Rome. This was, for instance, the method preferred
        by Caesar.

        From pp. 196-8 of William Smith's _A Dictionary of Greek and Roman
        Antiquities_ (London, John Murray, 1875), reproduced online at

        http://tinyurl.com/yre2za :

        << The Homeric heroes were bearded men. [...] [T]he Greeks wore the
        beard till the time of Alexander the Great [...]. Plutarch (Thes.
        c.5) says that the reason for the shaving was that they might not be
        pulled by the beard in battle. The custom of shaving the beard
        continued among the Greeks till the time of Justinian [...]. The
        Romans in early times wore the beard uncut [...]; and according to
        Varro (De Re Rust. II.11) and Pliny (VII.59), the Roman beards were
        not shaven till B.C. 300, when P. Ticinius Maenas brought over a
        barber from Sicily; and Pliny adds, that the first Roman who was
        shaved (rasus) every day was Scipio Africanus. His custom, however,
        was soon followed, and shaving became regular thing. The lower
        orders, then as now, were not always able to do the same, and hence
        the jeers of Martial (vii.95, xii.59). In the later times of the
        republic there were many who shaved the beard only partially, and
        trimmed it, so as to give it an ornamental form; to them the terms
        bene barbati (Cic. Catil. ii.10) and barbatuli (Cic. ad Att. I.14,
        16, Pro Cael. 14) are applied. When in mourning all the higher as
        well as the lower orders let their beards grow.

        In the general way in Rome at this time, a long beard barba
        promissa, (Liv. XXVII.34) was considered a mark of slovenliness and
        squalor. The censors, L. Veturius and P. Licinius, compelled M.
        Livius, who had been banished, on his restoration to the city, to be
        shaved, and to lay aside his dirty appearance (tonderi et squalorem
        deponere), and then, but not till then, to come into the senate, &c.
        (Liv. XXVII.34). The first time of shaving was regarded as the
        beginning of manhood, and the day on which this took place was
        celebrated as a festival [called Depositio barbae -- FB](Juv. Sat.
        III.186). There was no particular time fixed for this to be done.
        Usually, however, it was done when the young Roman assumed the toga
        virilis (Suet. Calig. 10). Augustus did it in his 24th year;
        Caligula in his 20th. The hair cut off on such occasions was
        consecrated to some god. Thus Nero put his up in a gold box, set
        with pearls, and dedicated it to Jupiter Capitolinus (Suet. Ner.
        12).

        With the emperor Hadrian the beard began to revive (Dion Cass.
        LXVIII.15). Plutarch says that the emperor wore it to hide some
        scars on his face. The practice afterwards became common, and till
        the time of Constantine the Great, the emperors appear in busts and
        coins with beards [...].

        BARBERS [Lat. tonsores -- FB] -- [...] Men had not often the
        necessary implements for the various operations of the toilet;
        combs, mirrors, perfumes, and tools for clipping, cutting, shaving,
        &c. Accordingly the whole process had to be performed at the
        barber's, and hence the great concourse of people who daily gossiped
        at the tonstrina, or barber's shop. [...] The business of the barber
        was threefold. First there was the cutting of hair [...]. The second
        part of the business was shaving (radere, rasitare, [...]). This was
        done with [...] a novacula (Lamprid. Heliog. c31), a razor (as we,
        retaining the Latin root, call it), which he kept in a case [...].
        Some who would not submit to the operation of the razor used instead
        some powerful depilatory ointments, or plasters, as psilothron
        (Plin. XXXII.10.47;a acida Creta, Martial, vi.93.9; Venetum lutum,
        iii.74; dropax, iii.74; x.65). Stray hairs which escaped the razor
        were pulled out with small pincers or tweezers (volsellae [...]).
        The third part of the barber's work was to pare the nails of the
        hands [...]. >>

        Hope this helps,
        Francesco
      • Daniel J. Milton
        The reference Francesco quoted on techniques for removing the beard employed in classical antiquity appears pretty thorough, but there s always something to be
        Message 3 of 29 , Mar 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          The reference Francesco quoted on techniques for removing the
          beard employed in classical antiquity appears pretty thorough, but
          there's always something to be added.
          The tyrant Dionysius of Syracuse being afraid to trust himself in
          the barber's hands, made his daughters learn to shave him. When they
          grew up, he dared not trust even them with a razor, but made them burn
          off his beard and hair with red-hot nut-shells.
          I'm pretty sure the source is Cicero in his Tusculan Disputations,
          but I haven't run the passage down.
          Dan Milton
        • Francesco Brighenti
          ... http://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Tusculan%C3%A6_Disputationes_-_Liber_V Quin etiam ne tonsori collum committeret, tondere filias suas docuit. Ita sordido
          Message 4 of 29 , Mar 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In Indo-Eurasian_research@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel J. Milton"
            <dmilt1896@...> wrote:

            > The tyrant Dionysius of Syracuse being afraid to trust himself in
            > the barber's hands, made his daughters learn to shave him. When
            > they grew up, he dared not trust even them with a razor, but made
            > them burn off his beard and hair with red-hot nut-shells. I'm
            > pretty sure the source is Cicero in his Tusculan Disputations, but
            > I haven't run the passage down.

            http://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Tusculan%C3%A6_Disputationes_-_Liber_V
            "Quin etiam ne tonsori collum committeret, tondere filias suas
            docuit. Ita sordido ancillarique artificio regiae virgines ut
            tonstriculae tondebant barbam et capillum patris. Et tamen ab is
            ipsis, cum iam essent adultae, ferrum removit instituitque, ut
            candentibus iuglandium putaminibus barbam sibi et capillum
            adurerent" (Marcus Tullius Cicero, _Tusculanae Disputationes_ 5. 58).

            Regards,
            Francesco
          • bhmsympatico
            You re welcome Victor. I m glad I could be of some help. Yes, those razors look a tad frightening but it s the Roman razors that are really disturbing.
            Message 5 of 29 , Apr 8, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              You're welcome Victor. I'm glad I could be of some help. Yes, those
              razors look a tad frightening but it's the Roman razors that are
              really disturbing. Thankfully the Romans didn't have bikini-lines to
              worry about.

              There were four types of razors used by the British Celts. For some
              examples of Celtic razors see the following site. It also contains
              examples of early razors primarily from the European Bronze and Iron Age.
              http://razorland55.free.fr/lune04.htm

              Now, the remaining question is what did they use to keep those
              handlebar moustaches curled? Could it be the same hair gel that the
              Irish imported from the Gauls?

              Sarah


              --- In Indo-Eurasian_research@yahoogroups.com, "Victor H. Mair"
              <vmair@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thank you, Sarah, for so much detailed information about mustaches
              among
              > the ancient Celts and excellent illustrations depicting them. With all
              > that shaving and shaping of the facial hair going on, I've often
              > wondered how the ancients did it. With the sharpest knife they had
              > around? I think I heard somewhere about scraping with sharp, broken
              > shells, but I may just be imagining that. In any event, I cut myself
              > often enough with safety razors, so the ancients must have bloodied
              > their faces quite a bit while shaving with less evolved instruments.
              > Does anyone know how they actually did it?
              >
              > Incidentally, some of Genghis Khans' early ambassadors were humiliated
              > by the Arabs in Kwarezmia by having their beards removed and faces
              > mutilated. Maybe they just did a particularly bad job of shaving them!
              >
              > Victor
              >
              >
              >
              > bhmsympatico wrote:
              > >
              > > Steve,
              > > Diodorus first mentions the practice of shaving amongst the Celts and
              > > notes that the nobles wore mustaches. The handlebar mustache was
              > > present but the most common form was the down turn mustache as seem on
              > > the bust of a Gallic chieftain, 1st century A.D. and the sculpture of
              > > The Dying Gaul They sometimes wore a thin, shaved beard under the lip
              > > (Clonycavan Man) like the thin, triangular beard on the Agamemnon
              > > Mask. The mask has two shared features with other European cultures:
              > > 1. shaving and a handlebar mustache and 2. a stylized graphic method
              > > of depicting the face.
              > >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.