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Re: query on tarjani mudra (& others)

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  • bhmsympatico
    Joanna, Thanks for the feed back, your point makes sense. I still think that there might be more to the horn than an association with aggression in IE
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Joanna,
      Thanks for the feed back, your point makes sense. I still think that
      there might be more to the horn than an association with aggression in
      IE cultures. The bull is associated with the most powerful of the
      heavenly gods. I appears in crowns in IE and Middle Eastern cultures
      and seems to connect the wearer with heavenly authority. Perhaps the
      horn contains heavenly power?

      Sarah

      --- In Indo-Eurasian_research@yahoogroups.com, "jkirk" <jkirk@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Sarah,
      > Thanks for the link. If one reviews the ancient Asian arts,
      including theater arts using masks, one finds that horns are a favored
      attribute of demons. They often have claws too, but hoofs are rather
      underplayed except on composite animals, where they don't function as
      apotropaic.
      > Agrarian people observed that animals with horns used them to attack
      other animals or people, much more so than hooves I'd guess, hence the
      cachet of horns for arousing fear. Another favored attribute is fangs,
      and I suspect that these also derive from observing the animal world
      of felines, like tigers, and perhaps monkeys. Horns and fangs, thus,
      the deadly weapons of animals who have them and thus of demons. The
      pronged hand gesture resembles both horns and fangs, in a way.
      > =================================================================================> Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2006 12:41 PM
      > Subject: [Indo-Eurasia] Re: query on tarjani mudra (& others)
      >
      >
      > Joanna,
      > The following is a link for material on the use of horns, horn
      > gestures, and horned animals.
      > http://www.panikon.com/phurba/occult/archives/horns/
      >
      > The material is primarily from Folk-lore and includes other sources on
      > the topic of Evil eye, horns, horn gestures, horn amulets, the
      > Mediterranean, India, Roman, Eturia, etc.
      >
      > ................ I also
      > wonder why the protection would reside in the horn as opposed to the
      > animals hoof?
      >
      > Sarah
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • jkirk
      Yes, but I was only considering horns (and by extension fangs) in relation to the tarjani mudra in particular, not in relation to lots of other things. As we
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1, 2006
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        Yes, but I was only considering horns (and by extension fangs) in relation to the tarjani mudra in particular, not in relation to lots of other things. As we know, symbols are multivalent.
        Joanna K.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: bhmsympatico

        Joanna,
        Thanks for the feed back, your point makes sense. I still think that
        there might be more to the horn than an association with aggression in
        IE cultures. The bull is associated with the most powerful of the
        heavenly gods. I appears in crowns in IE and Middle Eastern cultures
        and seems to connect the wearer with heavenly authority. Perhaps the
        horn contains heavenly power?

        Sarah



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • hfeltham@bigpond.net.au
        The horn is also associated with the Spring constellation of Taurus, and as such represents fertility and the power of the dominant male animal in the herd.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 2, 2006
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          The horn is also associated with the Spring constellation of Taurus, and as such represents fertility and the power of the dominant male animal in the herd. (It is also associated with deer, elands and rams.) The bull is often the preferred sacrificial animal of Indo-Eurasian cultures (Zoroaster was one of the few to actively preach against bull sacrifice, but it became a key element in Mithraism) and as such dies in order to allow seed to flourish. The Apis bull, like the Ammon ram, was a sacred beast to the Egyptians, and usually mummified with great pomp and ritual when it died.

          The bull is also associated with the four evangelists, and is one of the metamorphic flying animals that pull the chariot of Yaweh, the Jewish god. Human-headed bulls, lamassu, are key guardian figures in Assyrian art, while winged Persian lions are also frequently horned, probably following earlier nomad metamorphosis conventions, creating a powerful creature which combines key correlative power animals - bull, lion, eagle.

          A pervasive image in the west is the bull brought down by a big cat (as they do, though it's the lionesses that do the job), though there are Scythian bronzes that show leopards attacking deer, and early regional Chinese bronzes that have tigers going for buffalo.

          Death associated with continuing seasonal fertility seems to be a key motif, but the usual transfer of power through metaphysical contagion seems to be enacted with the symbolism of kingship.

          Heleanor Feltham
          IIS, UTS

          ---- bhmsympatico <bhm@...> wrote:
        • Francesco Brighenti
          ... to the tarjani mudra in particular, not in relation to lots of other things. As we know, symbols are multivalent. As a side note: Many tribal peoples of S.
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 2, 2006
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            --- In Indo-Eurasian_research@yahoogroups.com, "jkirk" <jkirk@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I was only considering horns (and by extension fangs) in relation
            to the tarjani mudra in particular, not in relation to lots of other
            things. As we know, symbols are multivalent.

            As a side note:

            Many tribal peoples of S. and S.E. Asia make a ritual use of bovine
            horns in connection with death rites and mortuary observances. These
            tribes often instal the horns or skulls of sacrificed bovines -- be
            these zebus, water buffaloes or mithuns -- on or at the base of
            megalithic monuments erected for either a memorial or a burial
            purpose, or -- particularly in island S.E. Asia -- they affix the
            buffalo horns (sometimes replaced by wooden ones) on their clan-
            houses in order to indicate the number of water-buffaloes offered in
            sacrifice to honour the family ancestors since the house was built.
            As an alternative, some tribes use to erect Y-shaped posts,
            reminding of a pair of bovine horns, on the occasion of their
            funerary or memorial rites.

            The V-shaped finials rising at either edge of the roof ridge of the
            traditional houses built by some N.E. Indian, N. Indo-Chinese and
            Indonesian tribes can be held to symbolize bovine horns -- in fact,
            they are often termed with words meaning 'horns' in the respective
            languages. This architectural feature is already noticed on a bronze
            model-house from Yunnan dated to c. 300 BC.

            Some selected examples:

            The Toda death ritual prescribes that the corpse of the deceased
            must, at a certain stage of the funeral ceremony, be made to touch
            the horns of the buffalo sacrificed on that occasion.

            Some Kondh traditional houses in highland Orissa still contain
            forked posts showing nice carved designs (clan marks), which are
            worshipped as symbols of the household ancestors.

            Among the Khasis of Meghalaya, the horns and jawbones of sacrificed
            zebus are customarily fixed to posts placed over the menhirs that
            are erected at different stages of the mortuary ritual.

            Among the Jingpo mountaineers of the Indo-Chinese-Burmese border
            region, the horns of sacrificed buffaloes are affixed to bamboo huts
            that are temporarily built on the earth mounds under which the
            Jingpos bury their dead.

            The Miao tribes of Guizhou (S. China) celebrate, generally every
            thirteen years, a great buffalo-sacrifice festival meant to
            celebrate a series of good crops and to honour their clan
            aancestors. The buffalo may in some cases be replaced by a bull or
            an ox. The donor's family members take away the head of the slain
            animal, which is fixed on the top of a ceremonial post. Later on the
            horns of the sacrificed bovines are heaped up in a special room of
            the house meant for ancestor-worship. Generally speaking, all the
            Miao/Hmong tribes conceive bovines as the best suited zoomorphic
            symbols of their ancestral heroes. The myths of the Miaos of Guizhou
            preserve the memory of legendary buffalo-sacrifices offered in by-
            gone days by the assembly of the householders to their ancestral
            spirits.

            The Dai people of Yunnan affix the horns of the buffaloes sacrificed
            at funerals to the inner walls of the house of the deceased.

            The horns of the water buffaloes sacrificed en masse at the
            secondary funeral ceremonies observed by the Torajas of Sulawesi are
            traditionally affixed to the front pole sustaining the roof of
            Toraja houses.

            The megalithic tombs of Sumba are richly decorated with sculptures
            in bas-relief which often represent the head or horns of a water
            buffalo. The rites of secondary burial of the bones of deceased
            Sumbanese nobles, for which the tombs are erected, culminate with
            the mass sacrifice of buffaloes and other animals. Many traditional
            Sumbanese houses have their outer walls covered with horns of the
            buffaloes sacrificed at such ceremonies.

            Kindest regards,
            Francesco
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