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Workshop: The Archaeology of Sasanian Politics

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  • Judith Lerner
    With apologies for cross-posting, and sent on behalf of its organizers, this upcoming workshop may be of interest to list members: The Archaeology of Sasanian
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 8, 2013
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      With apologies for cross-posting, and sent on behalf of its organizers, this upcoming workshop may be of interest to list members:

      The Archaeology of Sasanian Politics

      The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
      New York University
      15 East 84th Street
      New York, NY 10028
      isaw@...
      isaw.nyu.edu

      Seating is limited, please email <isaw@... >to register

      Friday, April 26, 2013
      8:45 a.m. -6:00 p.m.
      Lecture Hall

      Archaeological excavations, surveys, and analyses have revitalized the study of Sasanian history in recent years. The International Merv Project, the investigation of the "Great Wall of Gurgan," and the survey of the Mughan Steppe, among other projects, reveal a remarkably robust state in the fifth and sixth centuries, far more capable of marshaling men and material in its service than most historians have been willing to admit. In the aftermath of Hun invasions, the empire successfully reorganized its resources to invest in the massive infrastructure projects visible in Gurgan, Azerbaijan, and elsewhere that enabled Iran not simply to endure but to expand. It is the goal of our workshop to convene archaeologists and historians to debate how recent archaeology can provide new perspectives on the dynamics of Sasanian imperialism. We wish to move beyond the traditional historiographical paradigm of centralization / decentralization, nobles vs. kings of kings, toward archaeological perspectives on Sasanian politics. If we begin with the archaeology, do different questions, models, and approaches to Sasanian imperial dynamics present themselves?

      It is the aim of this workshop to discuss how the defensive walls, fortified settlements, irrigation systems, rural estates, urban structures, and other interventions in the landscape did not only reflect developments in the empire (e.g. the increasingly bureaucratized fiscal and military administrations normally attributed to the late Sasanians), but also created new opportunities for the organization of imperial resources, the mobilization and monitoring of aristocratic networks, and the recalibration of relations between provinces. At the same time, we would like to situate these historical developments in the longue durée landscape with which archaeologists work - and to which historians often only genuflect - that constrained the activities of this continental empire.

      Participants:
      Karim Alizadeh (Harvard Unveristy)
      Jairus Banaji (SOAS)
      Michael Bates (American Numismatic Society)
      Richard Bulliet (Columbia University)
      Roderick Campbell (ISAW)
      Emily Hammer (ISAW)
      Renate Holod (University of Pennsylvania)
      James Howard-Johnston (University of Oxford)
      Judith Lerner (ISAW)
      Scott McDonough (William Paterson University)
      Aleksandr Naymark (Hofstra University)
      St. John Simpson (The British Museum)
      Sören Stark (ISAW)

      Organized by Richard Payne (ISAW & Mount Holyoke College) and
      Mehrnoush Soroush (ISAW)

      For the full program, please go to
      <http://isaw.nyu.edu/events/the-archaeology-of-sasanian-politics>>

      Copyright (C) 2013 Unless otherwise noted, all content copyright New York University. You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this work under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution No Derivative Works license, provided you attribute its origin and refrain from altering it.

      Please note that audio recording and photography of any kind is not permitted at ISAW activities without prior consent. Requests can be emailed a week or more in advance to isaw@....


      ______
      Judith Lerner, PhD
      Research Associate
      Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
      New York University
      15 East 84 Street
      New York, NY 10028




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