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Embodied Emotion Perception

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  • rodo pfister
    Dear list members Has anyone institutional access to the following paper, and could send me the pdf, please? On weekends we should think more about our beauty
    Message 1 of 6 , May 1, 2011
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      Dear list members

      Has anyone institutional access to the following paper, and could send
      me the pdf, please? On weekends we should think more about our beauty
      this year, ....

      rodo
      (rodoX@...)
      ...............................................................
      http://spp.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/04/21/1948550611406138.abstract

      Embodied Emotion Perception: Amplifying and Dampening Facial Feedback
      Modulates Emotion Perception Accuracy

      David T. Neal and Tanya L. Chartrand

      Abstract

      How do we recognize the emotions other people are feeling? One source of
      information may be facial feedback signals generated when we
      automatically mimic the expressions displayed on others' faces.
      Supporting this "embodied emotion perception," dampening (Experiment 1)
      and amplifying (Experiment 2) facial feedback signals, respectively,
      impaired and improved people's ability to read others' facial emotions.
      In Experiment 1, emotion perception was significantly impaired in people
      who had received a cosmetic procedure that reduces muscular feedback
      from the face (Botox) compared to a procedure that does not reduce
      feedback (a dermal filler). Experiment 2 capitalized on the fact that
      feedback signals are enhanced when muscle contractions meet resistance.
      Accordingly, when the skin was made resistant to underlying muscle
      contractions via a restricting gel, emotion perception improved, and did
      so only for emotion judgments that theoretically could benefit from
      facial feedback.
    • JKirkpatrick
      [Mod. note. On Ekman, see http://www.paulekman.com - SF] Quickly: the best studies over the years on expressions of emotion in the human face are Paul Ekman s.
      Message 2 of 6 , May 1, 2011
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        [Mod. note. On Ekman, see http://www.paulekman.com - SF]

        Quickly: the best studies over the years on expressions
        of emotion in the human face are Paul Ekman's.
        He took Darwin seriously and carried the
        study far beyond him, even as others continue
        work on the subject.

        Joanna
        =================

        Dear list members

        Has anyone institutional access to the following paper, and could
        send me the pdf, please? On weekends we should think more about our
        beauty this year, ....

        rodo
        (rodoX@... <mailto:rodoX%40gmx.net> )
        ...............................................................
        <http://spp.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/04/21/1948550611406138.abstract>

        Embodied Emotion Perception: Amplifying and Dampening Facial
        Feedback
        Modulates Emotion Perception Accuracy

        David T. Neal and Tanya L. Chartrand

        Abstract

        How do we recognize the emotions other people are feeling? One
        source of information may be facial feedback signals generated when we
        automatically mimic the expressions displayed on others' faces.
        Supporting this "embodied emotion perception," dampening
        (Experiment 1) and amplifying (Experiment 2) facial feedback signals,
        respectively, impaired and improved people's ability to read others' facial
        emotions. In Experiment 1, emotion perception was significantly impaired in
        people who had received a cosmetic procedure that reduces muscular
        feedback from the face (Botox) compared to a procedure that does not
        reduce feedback (a dermal filler). Experiment 2 capitalized on the fact
        that feedback signals are enhanced when muscle contractions meet
        resistance. Accordingly, when the skin was made resistant to underlying
        muscle contractions via a restricting gel, emotion perception improved,
        and did so only for emotion judgments that theoretically could benefit
        from facial feedback.
      • rodo pfister
        Ok, got the paper! Thanks to a list member. Joanna, I did want to see the paper not because of an interest in the general subject, but because they seem to
        Message 3 of 6 , May 1, 2011
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          Ok, got the paper! Thanks to a list member.

          Joanna, I did want to see the paper not because of an interest in the
          general subject, but because they seem to make a special point; namely,
          saying that the reading of emotions (expressed on faces) of others is
          compromised when the function of one's own facial musculature is
          reduced. That would be an interesting insight, if confirmed.

          rodo

          Am 01.05.11 20:14, schrieb JKirkpatrick:
          >
          > [Mod. note. On Ekman, see http://www.paulekman.com - SF]
          >
          > Quickly: the best studies over the years on expressions of emotion in
          > the human face are Paul Ekman's.
          > He took Darwin seriously and carried the study far beyond him, even as
          > others continue work on the subject.
          >
          > Joanna
          > =================
          >
          > ...............................................................
          > <http://spp.sagepub.com/content/early/2011/04/21/1948550611406138.abstract>
          >
          > Embodied Emotion Perception: Amplifying and Dampening Facial Feedback
          > Modulates Emotion Perception Accuracy
          >
          > David T. Neal and Tanya L. Chartrand
        • Steve Farmer
          Dear Rodo, I m away from my home computers (I m in the mountains of Virginia on vacation) and haven t had a chance to read this paper yet. I saw a notice about
          Message 4 of 6 , May 1, 2011
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            Dear Rodo,

            I'm away from my home computers (I'm in the mountains of Virginia on
            vacation) and haven't had a chance to read this paper yet. I saw a
            notice about it when it first appeared online a week or so ago and
            have meant to take a look at it.

            The model makes theoretical sense in terms of standard models of
            emotion, like Damasio's "somatic marker" theory (which I assume must
            be is referenced in the paper) and older work by James, etc., and other
            papers like this one on the "embodiment of emotion" published in
            2009 in PLoS One:

            "Embodied Emotion Modulates Neural Signature of Performance
            Monitoring"

            http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0005754

            The model is also congruent with broader theories of brain processing involving
            topological mappings linking the brain with other parts of the body. We've used
            those models in the past to try to understand the universality of so-called
            correlative thinking in premodern religious, philosophical, and cosmological
            systems.

            That said, while the claim makes theoretical sense, I'd be pretty
            skeptical about their claimed results, since the idea that people who
            use botox have poker faces is really more popular myth than fact. I'm
            really skeptical that you could detect that using the kinds of crude
            psychological instruments they apparently used in the study.

            So my suspicion before reading the paper is that the researchers found
            what they were looking for -- based on a totally reasonable hypothesis, but
            probably too subtle an effect to detect with simple psychological instruments.

            Again, just a first impression from reading the abstract and some comments
            by others on the paper in various neurobiological blogs. I'm looking forward
            to reading the full paper.

            Best,
            Steve

            On May 1, 2011, at 5:51 PM, rodo pfister wrote:

            > Ok, got the paper! Thanks to a list member.
            >
            > Joanna, I did want to see the paper not because of an interest in the
            > general subject, but because they seem to make a special point;
            > namely,
            > saying that the reading of emotions (expressed on faces) of others is
            > compromised when the function of one's own facial musculature is
            > reduced. That would be an interesting insight, if confirmed.
            >
            > rodo


            Embodied Emotion Perception: Amplifying and Dampening Facial Feedback
            Modulates Emotion Perception Accuracy

            Abstract
            How do we recognize the emotions other people are feeling? One source
            of information may be facial feedback signals generated when we
            automatically mimic the expressions displayed on others’ faces.
            Supporting this “embodied emotion perception,” dampening (Experiment
            1) and amplifying (Experiment 2) facial feedback signals,
            respectively, impaired and improved people’s ability to read others’
            facial emotions. In Experiment 1, emotion perception was significantly
            impaired in people who had received a cosmetic procedure that reduces
            muscular feedback from the face (Botox) compared to a procedure that
            does not reduce feedback (a dermal filler). Experiment 2 capitalized
            on the fact that feedback signals are enhanced when muscle
            contractions meet resistance. Accordingly, when the skin was made
            resistant to underlying muscle contractions via a restricting gel,
            emotion perception improved, and did so only for emotion judgments
            that theoretically could benefit from facial feedback.
          • JKirkpatrick
            Yes it would indeed. I ve seen other reports to the same effect, but have no citations for them. I mentioned Ekman just for general info--should have said so,
            Message 5 of 6 , May 1, 2011
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              Yes it would indeed. I've seen other reports to the same effect,
              but have no citations for them.

              I mentioned Ekman just for general info--should have said so, I
              guess.

              Joanna

              _____

              Ok, got the paper! Thanks to a list member.

              Joanna, I did want to see the paper not because of an interest in
              the general subject, but because they seem to make a special point;
              namely, saying that the reading of emotions (expressed on faces) of
              others is compromised when the function of one's own facial musculature is
              reduced. That would be an interesting insight, if confirmed.

              rodo
            • Steve Farmer
              Dear Rodo, Actually, after a quick look at some of the literature, it turns out that the model stands up in a lot of outwardly independent cases. E.g., people
              Message 6 of 6 , May 1, 2011
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                Dear Rodo,

                Actually, after a quick look at some of the literature, it turns out
                that the model stands up in a lot of outwardly independent cases.
                E.g., people with facial paralysis or dampened ability to express
                emotion via the face (very common in Parkinson's disease) *do*
                apparently have difficulty reading out emotions correctly in others.

                On facial paralysis, see this particularly relevant paper from
                last year (open access):

                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20534832

                It finds that those with one kind of common facial paralysis

                > were selectively impaired in recognition of negative facial
                > expressions, thus demonstrating that the voluntary activation of
                > mimicry represents a high-level simulation mechanism crucially
                > involved in explicit attribution of emotions.

                Lots of similar things seem to show up in studies of Parkinson's
                disease and Huntington's disease patients, in whom the ability to
                make normal facial expressions are impaired. (Parkinson's patients
                often are thought to have "poker faces.")

                Quite interesting re. studies of brain-body mappings and what these
                imply re. the deep origins of correlative systems in history.

                Steve
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