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Turecek matters (weekend issue?) & 19th c. history/archaeology

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  • Franc Coarse
    [Reposted with tinyurls - thanks for the info, Steve!] Dear Peter, The reason why I am looking for the book is the following passage from the article by Mr
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 31, 2010
      [Reposted with tinyurls - thanks for the info, Steve!]

      Dear Peter,

      The reason why I am looking for the book is the following passage from
      the article by Mr Turecek. He writes:
      "Let us move back to the middle of the 19th century and imagine what
      we would probably know about our past. To begin with, we would not get
      even a slightest idea that we also subsisted on agriculture so many
      millenia ago. We would assume we were hunters and gatherers instead."

      My friend has wondered, however, if that is right.

      As to the /kamen/ issue, I have been told this kind of crazy ideas is
      quite typical of Turecek.
      Unfortunatelly, there is a whole bunch of people like him, a group of
      nationalist loonetics from various countries, Slavic as well as
      non-Slavic. A few examples (for fun (?)):

      <http://tinyurl.com/33laf7k>

      <http://tinyurl.com/255krxs>

      <http://tinyurl.com/38vogwt>

      More "fun" (or scary?) stuff:

      <http://tinyurl.com/2w6wquf>

      I would like to create a website devoted to similar crackpot stuff,
      but I am far too busy to be able to do it alone.

      Best,

      Franc

      P.S.: Since this thread, albeit connected with "prehistory", is a bit
      off-topic, the moderators may well wish that we go offlist - no
      problem with that, really. I do think, nevertheless, that the flu-like
      spread of this pseudo-science babble, hand in hand with nationalism,
      should somehow be coped with. Am I too naïve an idealist?

      2010/12/30 PETER HARDIE <peter.hardie1@...>
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks, Franc
      >
      > Looking in the Wikipedia entry on Sir John Lubbock, I found a reference to
      >
      > Trigger B.G. (1989); revised 2006. A history of archaeological thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
      >
      > But Glyn Daniel was a great archaeologist, and 'The Idea of Prehistory', being published lectures, is very clearly written.
      >
      > The etymology for Camboduunum in your German Wikipedia looks convincing and none of the forms in the Latin sources suggests a derivation from a Slav word kamen.
    • Suresh Kolichala
      ... Dear Blazek: I am still catching up on my post-vacation email, but this caught my attention. It is interesting that there is a semantic parallel in
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 9, 2011
        On Fri, Dec 31, 2010 at 4:41 AM, <blazek@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear Peter,
        >
        > Continental Celtic cambo- meant "crooked" (Delamarre, Dictionnaire de la
        > langue gauloise, Paris: Errance 2001, 85) and is known from numerous
        > European place names, e.g. also the river-name Chub flowing in south from
        > Bohemia.

        Dear Blazek: I am still catching up on my post-vacation email, but
        this caught my attention. It is interesting that there is a semantic
        parallel in Dravidian too: in Dravidian languages vanka- and muri-
        mean crooked, but both these words are used as a synonym for a rivulet
        or watercourse too. There are several place names in south India like
        vanka, vankadAri etc. associated with these words as well.

        By the way, what is the current scholarly opinion on the etymology of
        Praha? Is it widely accepted that it means "ford" and its name is
        similar to other place names based on -ford like Oxford, Statford,
        Frankfurt and Klagenfurt etc.?

        Thanks,
        Suresh.
      • blazek@phil.muni.cz
        Dear Suresh, Thanks for your kind words. I was born in the city Loket, i.e. elbow according to the crooked stream of the river Ohre (= German Eger). Almost
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 9, 2011
          Dear Suresh,

          Thanks for your kind words. I was born in the city Loket, i.e. "elbow"
          according to the crooked stream of the river Ohre (= German Eger). Almost
          the same motivation can be identified in the city name Cheb, from the verb
          (o)hýbat "to bend", after the stream of the same river.
          The name of our capital Praha has nothing to do with the ford name, it
          means the "scorched (place)", from the verb prazhit "to scorch". The same
          toponym is known in Poland and Bavaria, where in past the Slavs lived too.

          With best wishes,
          Vaclav
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