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Which is the ultimate Pentecostal number?

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  • Georgy S Thomas
    Friends, Which is the ultimate Pentecostal number in Malayalam? In my view, no song can pack a spiritual punch enough to energise any gathering of faithful
    Message 1 of 1114 , Sep 4, 2005
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      Friends,
      Which is the ultimate Pentecostal number in Malayalam? In my view, no
      song can pack a spiritual punch enough to energise any gathering of
      faithful than `Yeshu Kristu Uyirthu Jeevikkunnu…'
      In my previous avatar as a reporter for a Malayalam daily in the
      Syrian Christian heartland of Kozhencherry-Pathanamthitta, I used to
      traipse through many a country road on late Sunday mornings to
      observe the pastoral existence of the `rubber achayan', only
      to be greeted by the clanging of cymbals and the beating of drums
      from the prayer halls which dotted the country side as pastors worked
      the lather using the ultimate number. Incidentally, they are all the
      lost children of Malankara.

      My sources used to tell me that many an ammachi, who acted the
      archetypal mean-spirited harridan against coconut climber Paramu and
      velakkari Saramma on weekdays, emerged in these prayer halls as a
      transformed persona on Sundays, dropping their hair and jiving to the
      beat of the pastor, and wonder of wonders, even contributing
      liberally to the cause. I am sure that no song brings out the best in
      them than `Yeshu Kristu Uyirthu Jeevikkunnu…'
      Shorn off these Pentecostal tags, the song is still an uplifting one,
      and sung with passion, the chorus `Ha hallelujah, jayam
      hallelujah, Yeshu Karthavu jeevikkunnu…' can bring solace to
      many a weary soul. This is a song which has to be sung loudly, and
      with joy, and if you think you can't do so at your apartment or
      home, I recommend doing so at the nearest beach, standing very close
      to the waves, whose ceaseless lashing will drown out hostility from
      surroundings if what you produce is noise and not music.
      I am no fan of Pentecostal pastors, but to give credit where it is
      due, they have played a major role in popularising good Malayalam
      devotional songs and hymns.

      Do other forum members have their own personal favourites for the
      ultimate uplifting number? Or do you think none can match `Yeshu
      Kristu Uyirthu Jeevikkunnu…'? I would like to hear your views.

      Faithfully,
      Georgy S Thomas
      Bangalore
    • Thomas P
      Reading a misleading article made me write this. Every Orthodox Church has a constitution. Consitution is for the functioning of the Church in the world.
      Message 1114 of 1114 , Oct 18, 2005
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        Reading a misleading article made me write this. Every Orthodox Church
        has a constitution. Consitution is for the functioning of the Church
        in the world.

        Recently a member of the Malankara Church was challenging the
        consitution of the Malankara Church. Let me ask him one question? SOC
        also has a consitution. How the constitution of SOC originated? Was
        the Malankara Church involved in drafting it? SOC made several
        revisions to the constituion not involving Malankara Synod.

        Following is from an article about SOC consitution: "Every institution
        has a constitution rules and regulations of its own. They are
        considered to be binding. Every constitution and every law has three
        basic elements: firstly the party establishing the constitution,
        secondly, the party declaring it; thirdly, the party abiding by it"
        "Both the board of clergy and the board of trustees have the power to
        set up by-laws that do not conflict with the constitution of the
        Church its general law and judgments, nor with the decisions of the
        Holy Synods or the laws or the country where the diocese is
        established." {Source: Syrian Orthodox Church, Canada Diocese}

        So, SOC agrees that every institution has a constitution of its own.

        It was in 1933 that SOC officially adopted a consitution. Evidence is
        here: "the Synod of Homs which was held in February 1933 and set out a
        complete constitution for the church clarifying the jurisdiction ..."
        (The Concept of Jurisdiction and Authority in the Syrian Orthodox
        Church on Antioch Article by His Grace Mor Gregorios Johanna Ibrahim
        Metropolitan of Aleppo)

        "The articles of the Synod of Homs in the year 1933 became the basis
        for what is known today as the Church Constitution. In spite of this
        brief time many amendments have been made to this constitution by
        several synods which were held after that date. The last one was the
        Synod of Damascus in 1991 ..." (Ibid)

        So, they have amended the constitution drafted in 1933.

        Too much pride is not good for any one. Christianity requires
        accepting the realities and accepting each other. Other than rejecting
        it for pride reasons, what is there in the consitution of 1934 that is
        unacceptable to an Orthodox believer? It allows honoring the Patriarch
        of SOC (not in an exaggerated way, but in a practical way).
        It is only for ego that people fight and cause divisions. What is
        there so special in the new Jacobite constitution of 2000? Why is it
        not made public in the web?

        -Thomas
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