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Archaeological evidence for dating Kurukshetra war

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  • S.Kalyanaraman
    Excavations at Kurukshetra revealed Kuruk iron arrow and spearheads, dated by Thermoluminence (TM) to 2800 BC.
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2004
      Excavations at Kurukshetra revealed Kuruk iron arrow and spearheads,
      dated by Thermoluminence (TM) to 2800 BC.
      http://www.veda.harekrsna.cz/encyclopedia/krishna-archeology.htm

      There is nothing on record to establish that PGW pottery correlates
      with Mahabharata sites. See comments of Dr. SR Rao:

      Archaeological Evidence for Dating Kurukshetra War

      Dr. S. R. Rao (Bangalore)

      Summary of the paper:

      The archaeological evidence for the existence of Dwaraka of
      Mahabharata has been obtained from onshore and offshore excavations
      conducted in Dwarka and Bet Dwarka sea. It can be said, on this
      evidence, that the first city named by Sri Krishna as Dwaraka was
      built at Kusasthali in the island now known as Bet Dwarka-
      Shankhodhara. A few years later a port town was built by him on the
      mainland at the mouth of the river Gomati after reclaiming land as
      cited in Harivamsa. Both were submerged by sea as corroborated by
      Mahabharata as well as archaeological evidence. The date for the
      events ranging from the first construction of Kusasthali by the
      Yadava ruler Kakudmin Revata upto the end of Dwaraka built by
      Krishna, is 18th-17th century BCE. This date is based on TL date for
      the middle terrace wall and Late Harappan pottery, stone mould and
      the evidence of a seal and two inscriptions written in evolved Indus
      script. The possibility of finding some earlier evidence in Bet
      Dwaraka, though remote, cannot be ruled out, if Balapur Bay mud
      flats are excavated. Bet Dwaraka, with a hill on one side and sea on
      other sides, is identified with Kusasthali-Shankhodhara and
      Autardvipa of Mahabharata.

      We must also consider the archaeological evidence from the
      excavations conducted in the Kurukshetra region at Bhagwanpura,
      Mirzapur and Daulatpur. The late Harappa culture at Bhagwanpura IA
      is dated 1900-1700 BCE, and it continues in Period IB for sometime
      when the plain Gray Ware also starts appearing and precedes the
      Painted Gray Ware. As a result of the discussions held in 1971, it
      emerged that the OCP of Rajasthan, UP and Haryana show greater
      affinity with late Harappan ware than with any other. It may be
      recalled here that BB Lal who found OCP in ther pre-PGW levels of
      Hastinapur ignored the presence of OCP and took only PGW date into
      account for dating Mahabharata to 1000-1100 BCE.

      The date 1900-1700 BCE may be archaeologically acceptable for
      Mahabharata events. So far as weapons of war used in Kurukshetra
      battle are concerned, an idea can be had from the spears and
      harpoons of Bethur, an OCP-LHP sit near Kanpur. For such sturdy
      weapons of copper/bronze to be produced in 1900-1700 BCE, metallurgy
      must have developed well. Iron technology had just been introduced
      in Dwaraka where iron on stakes referred to in Mahabharata (Mausala
      Parva) has been found along with iron nails.
      http://www.hindunet.org/saraswati/colloquium/srrao01.htm
    • adhin88
      ... Kakudmin Raivata was not a lunar Yâdava, but a solar Shâryâta Mânava. The Shâryâtas merged with the Haihaya Yâdavas during the time of the
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 1, 2004
        A minor correction:
        > events ranging from the first construction of Kusasthali by the
        > Yadava ruler Kakudmin Revata

        Kakudmin Raivata was not a lunar Yâdava, but a solar Shâryâta Mânava.
        The Shâryâtas merged with the Haihaya Yâdavas during the time of the
        Kârtavîrya emperors.

        regards,
        Ishwa


        --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "S.Kalyanaraman"
        <kalyan97@y...> wrote:
        > Excavations at Kurukshetra revealed Kuruk iron arrow and
        spearheads,
        > dated by Thermoluminence (TM) to 2800 BC.
        > http://www.veda.harekrsna.cz/encyclopedia/krishna-archeology.htm
        >
        > There is nothing on record to establish that PGW pottery correlates
        > with Mahabharata sites. See comments of Dr. SR Rao:
        >
        > Archaeological Evidence for Dating Kurukshetra War
        >
        > Dr. S. R. Rao (Bangalore)
        >
        > Summary of the paper:
        >
        > The archaeological evidence for the existence of Dwaraka of
        > Mahabharata has been obtained from onshore and offshore excavations
        > conducted in Dwarka and Bet Dwarka sea. It can be said, on this
        > evidence, that the first city named by Sri Krishna as Dwaraka was
        > built at Kusasthali in the island now known as Bet Dwarka-
        > Shankhodhara. A few years later a port town was built by him on the
        > mainland at the mouth of the river Gomati after reclaiming land as
        > cited in Harivamsa. Both were submerged by sea as corroborated by
        > Mahabharata as well as archaeological evidence. The date for the
        > events ranging from the first construction of Kusasthali by the
        > Yadava ruler Kakudmin Revata upto the end of Dwaraka built by
        > Krishna, is 18th-17th century BCE. This date is based on TL date
        for
        > the middle terrace wall and Late Harappan pottery, stone mould and
        > the evidence of a seal and two inscriptions written in evolved
        Indus
        > script. The possibility of finding some earlier evidence in Bet
        > Dwaraka, though remote, cannot be ruled out, if Balapur Bay mud
        > flats are excavated. Bet Dwaraka, with a hill on one side and sea
        on
        > other sides, is identified with Kusasthali-Shankhodhara and
        > Autardvipa of Mahabharata.
        >
        > We must also consider the archaeological evidence from the
        > excavations conducted in the Kurukshetra region at Bhagwanpura,
        > Mirzapur and Daulatpur. The late Harappa culture at Bhagwanpura IA
        > is dated 1900-1700 BCE, and it continues in Period IB for sometime
        > when the plain Gray Ware also starts appearing and precedes the
        > Painted Gray Ware. As a result of the discussions held in 1971, it
        > emerged that the OCP of Rajasthan, UP and Haryana show greater
        > affinity with late Harappan ware than with any other. It may be
        > recalled here that BB Lal who found OCP in ther pre-PGW levels of
        > Hastinapur ignored the presence of OCP and took only PGW date into
        > account for dating Mahabharata to 1000-1100 BCE.
        >
        > The date 1900-1700 BCE may be archaeologically acceptable for
        > Mahabharata events. So far as weapons of war used in Kurukshetra
        > battle are concerned, an idea can be had from the spears and
        > harpoons of Bethur, an OCP-LHP sit near Kanpur. For such sturdy
        > weapons of copper/bronze to be produced in 1900-1700 BCE,
        metallurgy
        > must have developed well. Iron technology had just been introduced
        > in Dwaraka where iron on stakes referred to in Mahabharata (Mausala
        > Parva) has been found along with iron nails.
        > http://www.hindunet.org/saraswati/colloquium/srrao01.htm
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