Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Origins of Agriculture in South Asia

Expand Messages
  • mkelkar2003
    To date little information has been gleaned from the bones. A dental study found the teeth of the Mehrgarh people to be similar to those of the indigenous
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 1, 2006
      "To date little information has been gleaned from the bones. A dental
      study found the teeth of the Mehrgarh people to be similar to those of
      the indigenous Mesolithic people of southern Asia by being noticeably
      large. This appears to challenge the idea that their ancestors were
      immigrant farmers from the west rather than local people who has
      dimply adopted the idea and means of farming. Most Neolithic farmers
      had poor dental health, due partly to a diet of coarse plant foods
      invariably mixed with grit from the grinding process, and partly due
      to the large quantity of carbohydrates they consumed that caused
      decay. But caries were practically absent among the Mehrgarh people,
      their teeth being as healthy as those of hunter-gatherers. This
      appears to have been due to the fluoride that was naturally present in
      the river water. This reduced decay. But it caused yellow and brown
      staining on their teeth (Mithen 2003, p. 411)."

      "Up until the Mehrgarh discoveries, it was assumed that the
      domestication of G. arboretum occurred during the time of the Indus
      civilization, not earlier than 2500 BC. But we should not be
      surprised if the farmers of this region had already been cultivating
      cotton at 5500 BC; we know that farmers of the Jordan valley, who has
      a similar economy and technology to those at Mehrgarh, had been making
      fabrics since at least 8000 BC (Mithen 2005, p. 412)."

      Mithen, Steven (2003), "After the Ice: A Global Human History 20,000
      – 5000 BC," Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.