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Sir Ganga Ram: Father of Modern Lahore

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  • YMalaiya
    ‘Father of modern Lahore’ remembered on anniversary By Anjum Gill LAHORE: Philanthropist Sir Ganga Ram was paid rich tribute at a meeting held on Saturday
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 2 7:01 PM
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      �Father of modern Lahore� remembered on anniversary

      By Anjum Gill

      LAHORE: Philanthropist Sir Ganga Ram was paid rich tribute at a meeting held on Saturday to observe his 76th death anniversary at Shakir Ali Auditorium of the National College of Arts (NCA)

      Fiction House and the NCA�s Research and Publication Centre organised the meeting to remember Sir Ram, the engineer of Lahore city. Speakers also eulogised him for his charitable works.

      Sir Ram, a civil engineer by profession, supervised the construction of many classic buildings including the Lahore High Court and the Cathedral Church on The Mall.

      Intellectual and journalist Khaled Ahmed called Sir Ganga Ram the �father of modern Lahore�. He said philanthropists should be remembered irrespective of cast, colour or creed.

      Historian Dr Mubarik Ali said the social movement started by Sir Ram should be continued. �He did not do charity only for the sake of charity but his philosophy was to make independent charitable institutions,� said Dr Ali.

      Academy of Letters Director Qazi Javed pointed out the urgent need for the repair of Sir Ram�s smaadhi (burial place). �We need to look after Sir Ganga Ram�s smaadhi and other historical places in the city. It is not just the responsibility of the government, but also of citizens to raise funds for these historical places,� he said.

      Shafqat Tanveer Mirza, Rafey Shahzad, Nadeem Umar and Zubair Ghauri demanded that his smaadhi be revamped and his statue, which once stood in front of the Lahore Museum, be restored if still preserved somewhere.

      Sir Ram�s great granddaughter Shreela Flather is still donating funds to Sir Ganga Hospital. Ganga Ram was born in Mangtanwala (now in Sheikhupura district) in 1851. He studied at Government College, Lahore and did his engineering from Thomsan Engineering College in Roorki (India) in 1871. He later studied engineering at Bradford in United Kingdom.

      He started his career as an assistant engineer in 1873, building government offices at Faisalabad, Sargodha and Sheikhupura. He designed the Faisalabad district courts complex.

      He also designed and constructed General Post Office, Lahore Museum, Aitchison College, Mayo School of Arts (now the NCA), Ganga Ram Hospital, Lady Mclagan Girls High School, the chemistry department of the Government College University, the Albert Victor wing of Mayo Hospital, the Hailey College of Commerce, Ravi Road House for the Disabled, the Ganga Ram Trust Building on The Mall and Lady Maynard Industrial School. He also designed and constructed Model Town, once the most posh locality of Lahore, the powerhouse at Renala Khurd and the railway track between Pathankot and Amritsar.

      He was also a banker and built Ganga Ram Hospital, Lady Mclagan School and Renala Khurd Power House with his own money.

      He was a promising agriculturist, too. He purchased thousands acres of barren land in Lyallpur (now Faisalabad) on lease and by using engineering skills and modern irrigation methods, turned the arid lands into fertile fields. He retired in 1903. He died in London on July 10, 1927. His body was cremated and his ashes were brought back to India. A portion of the ashes were consigned to Ganga River and the rest buried in Lahore on the bank of the Ravi.

      http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_12-7-2004_pg7_24

      SECOND OPINION: Sir Ganga Ram should be remembered! �Khaled Ahmed�s TV Review

      Is there anyone else who has done more for the city of Lahore and therefore deserves to be respected? A scion of his family, Baroness Flathers of the UK, still contributes to the various charities in Lahore, including the Ganga Ram Hospital, without seeking the limelight

      Our post-1947 nationalism was not very informed. People who decided what part of history to retain and what to dump were not very knowledgeable. That could probably be attributed to the new bureaucracy that had come from India and was not careful when wiping the names of famous people from the roads of Lahore. Today we also don�t know the people our roads are named after. Some of the English names we have removed should have stayed because of their pro-Muslim acts or views.

      GEO (August 21, 2004) made a documentary on the samadhi of Ganga Ram on Ravi Road Lahore and took a look at its dilapidated condition. It was acknowledged that Ganga Ram was Lahore�s premier architect and builder, and had constructed most of its landmarks. His statue was removed from in front of the Museum after 1947 and his tomb was allowed to become dilapidated with time. The documentary showed how people had encroached on the precincts of the tomb and most of its supporting columns had fallen down. The tomb was also allowed to become the garbage dump of the locality. The host said that Lahore had a Ganga Ram Trust which earned a lot of money for the government from the properties left behind in 1947 by the descendants of Ganga Ram, but it was not greatly interested in the upkeep of the samadhi.

      Ganga Ram (1851-1927) contributed the following to Lahore as executive engineer of the city: planning and construction of its first Sanitation System and Water Works, the Lahore Museum, the Mayo School of Arts (National College of Arts), the High Court, the Lahore Cathedral, the General Post Office, the Aitchison College, Chemistry Department of the Government College Lahore, the Albert Victor Wing of the Mayo Hospital. As a philanthropist after 1903, he funded and built Sir Ganga Ram Free Hospital, the Hailey College of Commerce, Lady Maclagan Girls� High School, Ravi Road House of the Disabled, Sir Ganga Ram Trust Building on The Mall, Hindu and Sikh Widows� Home, Hindu Students Career Society, Home and School for Hindu and Sikh Widows, the Lady Maynard Industrial School for Sikh and Hindu Women and Girls. Is there anyone else who has done more for the city of Lahore and therefore deserves to be respected? A scion of his family, Baroness Flathers of the UK, still contributes to the various charities in Lahore, including the Ganga Ram Hospital, without seeking the limelight. Does the city have a conscience? Its response is a proliferation of xenophobic clergy.

      http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_5-10-2004_pg3_6

      Now you see them, now you don�t

       By Mariam Qureshi

      A statue of a seated Sir Ganga Ram, a prominent philanthropist described as the engineer of Lahore, used to be on display outside the Lahore Museum, said Mr Abbas.

      �It was a rare piece because it was not made of cast bronze but was actually carved out of bronze,� he said. �It is said that Sir Ganga Ram�s statue was later dumped into the parking lot of the National College of Arts. Where it went from there, nobody knows.�

      Mr Abbas also remembered a statue of Lala Lajpat Rai, a famous politician at the time of independence. The statue was displayed in front of Gol Bagh, which is now Nasir Bagh. According to FS Aijazuddin�s book �Lahore Recollected: an Album�, the current whereabouts of this statue are not known.

      �A marble bust of Sardar Dayal Singh Majithia was placed in the Dyal Singh Library,� said Mr Abbas. �He was a wealthy man, a philanthropist, the founder of Dyal Singh College and Library and the one-time owner of Dyal Singh mansion.�


      http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_6-8-2004_pg7_27


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    • lsrinivas
      ... wrote: Very interesting post. It is interesting to note that Pakistanis are now indulging in nostalgia. It does appear that many of these artifacts
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 3 8:13 AM
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        --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, YMalaiya <ymalaiya@y...>
        wrote:

        Very interesting post. It is interesting to note that Pakistanis are
        now indulging in nostalgia.

        It does appear that many of these artifacts (statues, busts etc) were
        transcreated in Delhi in 1947.

        There is a statue of Sir Ganga Ram in the Ganga Ram Hospital in
        Delhi. Likewise, there is a bust of Dyal Singh in the Dyal Singh
        College. There is a bust of Mahatma Hansraj in the Hansraj College.
        Mahatma Hansraj not mentioned in the article was a principal of DAV
        School in Lahore and the founder principal of DAV College. The DAV
        College was transported lock, stock and barrel from Lahore to Delhi
        in 1948 and now goes by the name of Hansraj College.

        In a sense, Mahatma Hansraj was the founder of the entire DAV
        educational movement which today gives high quality education in the
        cities of India.

        But what are these people without the institutions they labored over
        all their lives?

        Lakshmi Srinivas
        >
        > `Father of modern Lahore' remembered on anniversary
        >
        > By Anjum Gill
        >
        > LAHORE: Philanthropist Sir Ganga Ram was paid rich tribute at a
        meeting held on Saturday to observe his 76th death anniversary at
        Shakir Ali Auditorium of the National College of Arts (NCA)
        >
        > Fiction House and the NCA's Research and Publication Centre
        organised the meeting to remember Sir Ram, the engineer of Lahore
        city. Speakers also eulogised him for his charitable works.
        >
        > Sir Ram, a civil engineer by profession, supervised the
        construction of many classic buildings including the Lahore High
        Court and the Cathedral Church on The Mall.
        >
        > Intellectual and journalist Khaled Ahmed called Sir Ganga Ram
        the `father of modern Lahore'. He said philanthropists should be
        remembered irrespective of cast, colour or creed.
        >
        > Historian Dr Mubarik Ali said the social movement started by Sir
        Ram should be continued. "He did not do charity only for the sake of
        charity but his philosophy was to make independent charitable
        institutions," said Dr Ali.
        >
        > Academy of Letters Director Qazi Javed pointed out the urgent need
        for the repair of Sir Ram's smaadhi (burial place). "We need to look
        after Sir Ganga Ram's smaadhi and other historical places in the
        city. It is not just the responsibility of the government, but also
        of citizens to raise funds for these historical places," he said.
        >
        > Shafqat Tanveer Mirza, Rafey Shahzad, Nadeem Umar and Zubair Ghauri
        demanded that his smaadhi be revamped and his statue, which once
        stood in front of the Lahore Museum, be restored if still preserved
        somewhere.
        >
        > Sir Ram's great granddaughter Shreela Flather is still donating
        funds to Sir Ganga Hospital. Ganga Ram was born in Mangtanwala (now
        in Sheikhupura district) in 1851. He studied at Government College,
        Lahore and did his engineering from Thomsan Engineering College in
        Roorki (India) in 1871. He later studied engineering at Bradford in
        United Kingdom.
        >
        > He started his career as an assistant engineer in 1873, building
        government offices at Faisalabad, Sargodha and Sheikhupura. He
        designed the Faisalabad district courts complex.
        >
        > He also designed and constructed General Post Office, Lahore
        Museum, Aitchison College, Mayo School of Arts (now the NCA), Ganga
        Ram Hospital, Lady Mclagan Girls High School, the chemistry
        department of the Government College University, the Albert Victor
        wing of Mayo Hospital, the Hailey College of Commerce, Ravi Road
        House for the Disabled, the Ganga Ram Trust Building on The Mall and
        Lady Maynard Industrial School. He also designed and constructed
        Model Town, once the most posh locality of Lahore, the powerhouse at
        Renala Khurd and the railway track between Pathankot and Amritsar.
        >
        > He was also a banker and built Ganga Ram Hospital, Lady Mclagan
        School and Renala Khurd Power House with his own money.
        >
        > He was a promising agriculturist, too. He purchased thousands acres
        of barren land in Lyallpur (now Faisalabad) on lease and by using
        engineering skills and modern irrigation methods, turned the arid
        lands into fertile fields. He retired in 1903. He died in London on
        July 10, 1927. His body was cremated and his ashes were brought back
        to India. A portion of the ashes were consigned to Ganga River and
        the rest buried in Lahore on the bank of the Ravi.
        >
        > http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_12-7-2004_pg7_24
        >
        > SECOND OPINION: Sir Ganga Ram should be remembered! —Khaled Ahmed's
        TV Review
        >
        > Is there anyone else who has done more for the city of Lahore and
        therefore deserves to be respected? A scion of his family, Baroness
        Flathers of the UK, still contributes to the various charities in
        Lahore, including the Ganga Ram Hospital, without seeking the
        limelight
        >
        > Our post-1947 nationalism was not very informed. People who decided
        what part of history to retain and what to dump were not very
        knowledgeable. That could probably be attributed to the new
        bureaucracy that had come from India and was not careful when wiping
        the names of famous people from the roads of Lahore. Today we also
        don't know the people our roads are named after. Some of the English
        names we have removed should have stayed because of their pro-Muslim
        acts or views.
        >
        > GEO (August 21, 2004) made a documentary on the samadhi of Ganga
        Ram on Ravi Road Lahore and took a look at its dilapidated condition.
        It was acknowledged that Ganga Ram was Lahore's premier architect and
        builder, and had constructed most of its landmarks. His statue was
        removed from in front of the Museum after 1947 and his tomb was
        allowed to become dilapidated with time. The documentary showed how
        people had encroached on the precincts of the tomb and most of its
        supporting columns had fallen down. The tomb was also allowed to
        become the garbage dump of the locality. The host said that Lahore
        had a Ganga Ram Trust which earned a lot of money for the government
        from the properties left behind in 1947 by the descendants of Ganga
        Ram, but it was not greatly interested in the upkeep of the samadhi.
        >
        > Ganga Ram (1851-1927) contributed the following to Lahore as
        executive engineer of the city: planning and construction of its
        first Sanitation System and Water Works, the Lahore Museum, the Mayo
        School of Arts (National College of Arts), the High Court, the Lahore
        Cathedral, the General Post Office, the Aitchison College, Chemistry
        Department of the Government College Lahore, the Albert Victor Wing
        of the Mayo Hospital. As a philanthropist after 1903, he funded and
        built Sir Ganga Ram Free Hospital, the Hailey College of Commerce,
        Lady Maclagan Girls' High School, Ravi Road House of the Disabled,
        Sir Ganga Ram Trust Building on The Mall, Hindu and Sikh Widows'
        Home, Hindu Students Career Society, Home and School for Hindu and
        Sikh Widows, the Lady Maynard Industrial School for Sikh and Hindu
        Women and Girls. Is there anyone else who has done more for the city
        of Lahore and therefore deserves to be respected? A scion of his
        family, Baroness Flathers of the UK, still contributes to the
        > various charities in Lahore, including the Ganga Ram Hospital,
        without seeking the limelight. Does the city have a conscience? Its
        response is a proliferation of xenophobic clergy.
        >
        >
        > http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_5-10-2004_pg3_6
        >
        > Now you see them, now you don't
        >
        > By Mariam Qureshi
        >
        > A statue of a seated Sir Ganga Ram, a prominent philanthropist
        described as the engineer of Lahore, used to be on display outside
        the Lahore Museum, said Mr Abbas.
        >
        > "It was a rare piece because it was not made of cast bronze but was
        actually carved out of bronze," he said. "It is said that Sir Ganga
        Ram's statue was later dumped into the parking lot of the National
        College of Arts. Where it went from there, nobody knows."
        >
        > Mr Abbas also remembered a statue of Lala Lajpat Rai, a famous
        politician at the time of independence. The statue was displayed in
        front of Gol Bagh, which is now Nasir Bagh. According to FS
        Aijazuddin's book `Lahore Recollected: an Album', the current
        whereabouts of this statue are not known.
        >
        > "A marble bust of Sardar Dayal Singh Majithia was placed in the
        Dyal Singh Library," said Mr Abbas. "He was a wealthy man, a
        philanthropist, the founder of Dyal Singh College and Library and the
        one-time owner of Dyal Singh mansion."
        >
        >
        > http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_6-8-2004_pg7_27
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
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        > Better first dates. More second dates. Yahoo! Personals
      • S.Kalyanaraman
        ... wrote: Very interesting post. It is interesting to note that Pakistanis are now indulging in nostalgia. There is another group keen on tracing their
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 4 3:00 AM
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          --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "lsrinivas" <lsrinivas@y...>
          wrote:> Very interesting post. It is interesting to note that
          Pakistanis are > now indulging in nostalgia.

          There is another group keen on tracing their civilizational roots and
          preserving temples on River Sindhu.

          http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/phs/ Pakistan Heritage Society.

          Salt Range Temples:

          Along the Indus river and in the Salt Range mountains, temples dating
          from the sixth to the early eleventh century survive in upper
          Pakistan. A joint project with Professors Abdur Rehman, past Chairman
          of the Department of Archaeology, University of Peshawar, and Farid
          Khan, founder of the Pakistan Heritage Society, has begun to analyse
          and document these important monuments in the history of South Asian
          temple architecture with funding from the University of Pennsylvania.
          Two seasons of excavation have been carried out at the site of North
          Kafirkot.

          http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/arth/meister/pakistan.html

          See two views of temples (2000) at:

          http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/arth/meister/new2x2a.jpg

          An international Workshop on the Salt Range Culture Zone was held at
          the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Wisconsin,
          Madison, in April 2004, with the sponsorship of the American
          Institute of Pakistan Studies.

          http://www.southasia.upenn.edu/home/calendar/2003-
          2004/SRangeProgram.htm
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