Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Did Indus writing deal with numeration? No. The writing dealt with metalware accounting as bills-of-lading.

Expand Messages
  • S. Kalyanaraman
    http://bharatkalyan97.blogspot.in/2013/05/did-indus-writing-deal-with-numeration.html MAY 28
    Message 1 of 2 , May 27, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      http://bharatkalyan97.blogspot.in/2013/05/did-indus-writing-deal-with-numeration.html
      http://bharatkalyan97.blogspot.in/2013/04/indus-writing-and-numeration-dr-bv.html?q=subbarayappa

      Item 1. BVSubbarayappa the Rigvedic People Their Identity 1995, in LK Srinivasan and S. Nagaraju, eds., Sri Nagabhinandanam Dr. MS Nagaraja Rao Festschrift, Bangalore, Dr. MS Nagaraja Rao Felicitation Committee, pp. 83-97

      http://www.scribd.com/doc/138058489/BVSubbarayappa-the-Rigvedic-People-Their-Identity-1995 


      Item 2. BVSubbaryappa Indus Numeration QJMS Vol 100 No 4 Oct Dec 2009 Indus numeration, inscriptional confirmatory evidence in Quarterly Journal of Mythical Society, Vol. 100 No. 4, Oct. - Dec. 2009

      http://www.scribd.com/doc/138059142/BVSubbaryappa-Indus-Numeration-QJMS-Vol-100-No-4-Oct-Dec-2009

      Dr. BV Subbarayappa has made a remarkable contribution to understanding the Hindu traditions of writing systems. He focusses on the method of representing numerals starting with Brahmi and Kharoshthi scripts using evidences of epigraphs of the historical period.
      Prof. Subhash Kak has sought to establish Brahmi as a continuum from Indus writing.
      When dealing with Indus writing, we were handicapped by the scanty evidence available with only a couple of thousands of inscriptions. Cypher methods could not be applied principally because the size of most of the inscriptions was only an average of 5 'signs'.
      As I delved into the problem of understanding the underlying language spoken by the creators of the writing system, I was lucky to deal with a significant-size of number of inscriptions which total over 5000 in the Indus writing corpora.
      Following up Denise Schmandt-Besserat's work on the functions served by tokens and clay bullae in Sumer and adjacent civilizations, I found that HARP (Harvard Harappa Project) excavations provided a lead to unravel the functions served by tablets with Indus inscriptions. It could be demonstrated that tablets with very short-sized inscriptions could have been used to label work-in-process on workers' platforms. These tablets could have provided the information which was transferred into 'seals' which the constituted bills of lading for the artifacts produced by the workers.
      The key to the functions served by seals is provided by the frequently-occurring pictorial motif variously described as 'cult object' or 'device in front of the one-horned young bull calf'. 
      Following up the latter description, it was possible to decipher the pictorial motif as sangaḍa picturing a composite of 'gimlet, portable furnace' glyphs. This word sangaḍa could be read rebus as jangaḍ 'entrustment articles’. jangaiyo  is a Gujarati lexeme which meant ‘military guard who accompanies treasure into the treasury’. Thus, it was possible to hypothesise the function served by the ligatured pictorial motif of a 'one-horned young bull calf' with special ligatures of rings on neck, pannier and one horn. Reading all these as hieroglyphs, the pictorial motif could be read kõdā खोंड [ khōṇḍa ] m A young bull, a bullcalf. (Marathi) Rebus: A. kundār, B. kũdār, °ri, Or. kundāru; H. kũderā m. ʻone who works a lathe, one who scrapesʼ, °rī f.,  kũdernā ʻ to scrape, plane, round on a lathe ʼ(CDIAL 3297).

      M. sãgaḍ f. ʻ a body formed of two or more fruits or animals or men &c. linked together (CDIAL 12859). जांगड [jāṅgaḍa] Linking together (of beasts): joining or attaching (as a scholar to a superior one, in order to learn). v घाल, कर. Also the state, linkedness, co-yokedness, attachment, association. (Marathi).The semantics explain why composite animal glyphs are created in Indus writing. The artisan conveyed the semantics of sãgaḍ for bronze-age accounting of 'entrustment articles' -- jangaḍ as the artisans moved such articles into the treasury or warehouse.


      The frequently-occuring pair of hieroglyphs of 'one-horned young bull calf' in front of 'gimlet, portable furnace could thus read together to connote a metals turner who was a courier of the'entrustment articles', jangaḍ. The jangaiyo was both a metals turner and a courier.

      1. Mohenjo-daro seal M006 with the pictorial motif combination: First image: 'one-horned young bull calf' + pannier + rings on neck + Second image: 'gimlet' + 'portable furnace' combined into a 'standard device' in front of the first image.

      This method of cypher dealing with both pictorial motifs and signs as hieroglyphs read as part of a logo-semantic system of representation, led to the elucidation of almost the entire corpora of Indus writing -- characterised by a set of vivid, unambiguous hieroglyphs for e.g. of a crocodile holding a fish in its jaw or a wild animal in front of a trough etc. etc. -- as lists of metalware catalogs.

      See also: http://bharatkalyan97. blogspot.in/2013/05/tokens- and-bullae-evolve-into-indus. html 

      Kalyanaraman

      --
      S. Kalyanaraman
    • Ram Varmha
      More of the same meaningless gibberish. Has this read-rebus passed any scholarly test? Regards, Ram ... From: S. Kalyanaraman Subject:
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 9, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        .
        Has this read-rebus passed any scholarly test?
        Regards,
        Ram

        --- On Tue, 5/28/13, S. Kalyanaraman wrote:

        From: S. Kalyanaraman
        Subject: [Ind-Arch] Did Indus writing deal with numeration? No. The writing dealt with metalware accounting as bills-of-lading.
        To:
        Date: Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 1:24 AM

        http://bharatkalyan97.blogspot.in/2013/05/did-indus-writing-deal-with-numeration.html
        http://bharatkalyan97.blogspot.in/2013/04/indus-writing-and-numeration-dr-bv.html?q=subbarayappa

        Item 1. BVSubbarayappa the Rigvedic People Their Identity 1995, in LK Srinivasan and S. Nagaraju, eds., Sri Nagabhinandanam Dr. MS Nagaraja Rao Festschrift, Bangalore, Dr. MS Nagaraja Rao Felicitation Committee, pp. 83-97

        http://www.scribd.com/doc/138058489/BVSubbarayappa-the-Rigvedic-People-Their-Identity-1995


        Item 2. BVSubbaryappa Indus Numeration QJMS Vol 100 No 4 Oct Dec 2009 Indus numeration, inscriptional confirmatory evidence in Quarterly Journal of Mythical Society, Vol. 100 No. 4, Oct. - Dec. 2009

        http://www.scribd.com/doc/138059142/BVSubbaryappa-Indus-Numeration-QJMS-Vol-100-No-4-Oct-Dec-2009

        Dr. BV Subbarayappa has made a remarkable contribution to understanding the Hindu traditions of writing systems. He focusses on the method of representing numerals starting with Brahmi and Kharoshthi scripts using evidences of epigraphs of the historical period.
        Prof. Subhash Kak has sought to establish Brahmi as a continuum from Indus writing.
        When dealing with Indus writing, we were handicapped by the scanty evidence available with only a couple of thousands of inscriptions. Cypher methods could not be applied principally because the size of most of the inscriptions was only an average of 5 'signs'.
        As I delved into the problem of understanding the underlying language spoken by the creators of the writing system, I was lucky to deal with a significant-size of number of inscriptions which total over 5000 in the Indus writing corpora.
        Following up Denise Schmandt-Besserat's work on the functions served by tokens and clay bullae in Sumer and adjacent civilizations, I found that HARP (Harvard Harappa Project) excavations provided a lead to unravel the functions served by tablets with Indus inscriptions. It could be demonstrated that tablets with very short-sized inscriptions could have been used to label work-in-process on workers' platforms. These tablets could have provided the information which was transferred into 'seals' which the constituted bills of lading for the artifacts produced by the workers.
        The key to the functions served by seals is provided by the frequently-occurring pictorial motif variously described as 'cult object' or 'device in front of the one-horned young bull calf'.�
        Following up the latter description, it was possible to decipher the pictorial motif as�sangaḍa�picturing a composite of 'gimlet, portable furnace' glyphs. This word�sangaḍa could be read rebus as�jangaḍ 'entrustment articles’.�jangaiyo� is a Gujarati lexeme which meant ‘military guard who accompanies treasure into the treasury’. Thus, it was possible to hypothesise the function served by the ligatured pictorial motif of a 'one-horned young bull calf' with special ligatures of rings on neck, pannier and one horn. Reading all these as hieroglyphs, the pictorial motif could be read�kõdāखोंड[ khōṇḍa ]mA young bull, a bullcalf. (Marathi) Rebus:�A.kundār, B.kũdār,°ri, Or.kundāru; H.kũderām. ʻone who works a lathe, one who scrapesʼ,°rīf.,��kũdernāʻ to scrape, plane, round on a lathe ʼ(CDIAL 3297).

        M.sãgaḍf. ʻ a body�formed of two or more fruits or animals or men &c. linked together (CDIAL 12859).�जांगड[jāṅgaḍa]Linking together (of beasts): joining or attaching (as a scholar to a superior one, in order to learn).vघाल, कर. Also the state, linkedness, co-yokedness, attachment, association. (Marathi).The semantics explain why composite animal glyphs are created in Indus writing. The artisan conveyed the semantics of�sãgaḍ�for bronze-age accounting of 'entrustment articles' --�jangaḍ�as the artisans moved such articles into the treasury or warehouse.


        The frequently-occuring pair of hieroglyphs of 'one-horned young bull calf' in front of 'gimlet, portable furnace could thus read together to connote a metals turner who was a courier of the'entrustment articles',�jangaḍ.�The�jangaiyo�was both a metals turner and a courier.

        1. Mohenjo-daro seal M006 with the pictorial motif combination: First image: 'one-horned young bull calf'�+ pannier�+ rings on neck�+ Second image: 'gimlet'�+ 'portable furnace' combined into a 'standard device' in front of the first image.

        This method of cypher dealing with both pictorial motifs and signs as hieroglyphs read as part of a logo-semantic system of representation, led to the elucidation of almost the entire corpora of Indus writing -- characterised by a set of vivid, unambiguous hieroglyphs for e.g. of a crocodile holding a fish in its jaw or a wild animal in front of a trough etc. etc. -- as lists of metalware catalogs.

        See also:�http://bharatkalyan97. blogspot.in/2013/05/tokens- and-bullae-evolve-into-indus. html

        Kalyanaraman

        --
        S. Kalyanaraman
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.