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Re: Meaning of 'pansari'

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  • radha_canada
    ... wrote: The word is derived from Sanskrit paNyazAlI; the one who has a paNya zAlA (shop) - used mainly for gorcers.
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 27, 2013
      --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "Arvind!" <arvind_vyas@...> wrote:
      >
      > The word is derived from Sanskrit paNyazAlI; the one who has
      > a paNya zAlA (shop) - used mainly for gorcers.
      > http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.10:1:493.dasahindi
      > Sk. paNya = Saleable, vendible.
      > Note that I am using HK notation.
      > Hope this clarifies.
      > Best regards,
      > Arvind Vyas
      > --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "Lakshmi" <lsrinivas@> wrote:
      > >
      > > What does the Hindi word (or term) 'pansari' signify? 
      > > Different dictionaries give different meanings: from one who
      > > helps irrigation to messenger to seller of spices 
      > > and medicinal herbs. 
      > > 
      > > Can somebody comment?
      > > 
      > > Lakshmi Srinivas
      > >

      This reminds me of the etymology of  'Gandhi' (which also happens to be Mahatmaji's surname) that I read long ago in a Gujarati book.

      In Gujarati 'Gandhi' (ગાંધી) means a grocer.  It can also mean a druggist.  The book I read traces the origin of the word to Sanskrit 'gandhaka' (गन्धक) meanig sulfur and ultimately to smell (gandha à¤—न्ध) because sulfur is characterized by a strong odour.  A person selling gandhaka and hence medicines came to be known as Gandhi.  And that term eventually became applicable to any grocer, not just to sellers of medicines.  Perhaps, as in modern north America,  the ancient Gujarati drugstores also sold many things besides medicines :)

      On another note, is paNya related to Sanskrit 'paNa' meaning coin as in kArSapaNa?  In Malayalam, paNam means money and was also an old coin (of value 1/48 of a rupee but I am not sure because coins such as paNam, cakram, kAzu etc. had gone out of usage long before I was born.)

      Thanks and regards,
      Radhakrishna Warrier


    • radha_canada
      ... Pansaara, panchaara etc are shortened versions used in colloquial speech for panchasaara meaning sugar in Malayalam. Panchasaara in Sanskrit would mean
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 27, 2013
        --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, Rajan Menon <vajradanta5@...> wrote:
        >
        > Pansaara in Malayalam means sugar.


        Pansaara, panchaara etc are shortened versions used in colloquial speech for panchasaara meaning sugar in Malayalam. Panchasaara in Sanskrit would mean that which has five ingredients or parts (pancha = five, saara = parts, contents, ingredients, meaning etc.) I have no idea what those 'five parts' are in the case of sugar.

        I believe Telugu for sugar is Panchadaara.

        Thanks and regards,
        Radhakrishna Warrier
      • Rajan Menon
        Hai, I wish to add the following: The ancient term Panis (probably traders) from the vedic period which is now known as Bania -shopkeeper. The term may have
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 28, 2013
          Hai,
          I wish to add the following:
          The ancient term "Panis" (probably traders) from the vedic period which is now known as "Bania"-shopkeeper. The term may have evolved from "pan".
          "paan" in Hispanic signifies bread.
          Dr.Loganathan may have some comments on links to ancient Sumerian.

          Thanks,

          Rajan


          On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 3:51 AM, Arvind! <arvind_vyas@...> wrote:
           

          Hi Lakshmi,

          The word is derived from Sanskrit paNyazAlI; the one who has a paNya zAlA (shop) - used mainly for gorcers.

          http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.10:1:493.dasahindi

          Sk. paNya = Saleable, vendible.

          Note that I am using HK notation.

          Hope this clarifies.

          Best regards,
          Arvind Vyas


          --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "Lakshmi" wrote:
          >
          > What does the Hindi word (or term) 'pansari' signify? Different dictionaries give different meanings: from one who helps irrigation to messenger to seller of spices and medicinal herbs.
          >
          > Can somebody comment?
          >
          > Lakshmi Srinivas
          >


        • sujay rao
          Literacy in pre-Buddhist India (before 600 BC)   Please find my collection of papers on literacy in Pre-Buddhist India   Before mature phase of Indus valley
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 2, 2013

            Literacy in pre-Buddhist India (before 600 BC)

             

            Please find my collection of papers on literacy in Pre-Buddhist India

             

            Before mature phase of Indus valley civilization (before 2600 BC)

             

            -          There are some potters marks but none qualify as full writing

             

            Indus valley civilization (2600 BC to 1900 BC)

             

            1. The reconfirmation and reinforcement of the Indus script thesis (very logical and self explanatory paper)

             

             

            http://www.scribd.com/doc/46387240/Sujay-Indus-Script-Final-Version-Final-Final

             

            1. The reintroduction of the lost manuscript hypothesis (the case for this thesis has obviously become much stronger in the recent past)

             

             

            http://www.scribd.com/doc/111707419/Sujay-Indus-Reintroducing-Lost-Manuscript-Hypothesis

             

            Post-Harappan India (1600 BC to 600 BC)

             

            1. Literacy in post-Harappan india (obviously literacy in post-Harappan India existed in certain pockets & were limited to very small sections of society- alphabetic scripts were brought from West Asia and the Indus script also continued – this a very logical and self-explanatory paper and anyone can cross-verify the conclusions)

             

            http://www.scribd.com/doc/127306265/Sujay-Post-Harappan-Literacy-and-origin-of-Brahmi

             

            Sujay Rao Mandavilli

             

             



            --- On Wed, 2/27/13, Rajan Menon <vajradanta5@...> wrote:

            From: Rajan Menon <vajradanta5@...>
            Subject: Re: [Ind-Arch] Meaning of 'pansari'
            To: IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 10:41 PM

             

            Pansaara in Malayalam means sugar.
            Panasa in Smskrt means the Bread Fruit or Jaka tree.
            Phanas in Marathi is the Jack Fruit or Jack Fruit tree.

            I will investigate further as to Hindi.

            Rajan Menon 


            On Tue, Feb 26, 2013 at 10:31 AM, Lakshmi <lsrinivas@...> wrote:
             

            What does the Hindi word (or term) 'pansari' signify? Different dictionaries give different meanings: from one who helps irrigation to messenger to seller of spices and medicinal herbs.

            Can somebody comment?

            Lakshmi Srinivas


          • Srinivasan
            These are entries in Comparative Dictionary of Indo-Aryan Languages (CDIAL): CDIAL 8835 prasāra m. ʻ extension ʼ Suśr., ʻ trader s shop ʼ Nalac. [Cf.
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 2, 2013
              These are entries in Comparative Dictionary of Indo-Aryan Languages (CDIAL):

              CDIAL 8835 prasāra m. ʻ extension ʼ Suśr., ʻ trader's shop ʼ Nalac. [Cf. prasārayati ʻ spreads out for sale ʼ Mn. -- √sr̥]
              Paš. lāsar ʻ bench -- like flower beds outside the window ʼ IIFL iii 3, 113; K. pasār m. ʻ rest ʼ (semant. cf. prásarati in Ku. N. Aw.); P. puhārā m. ʻ breaking out (of fever, smallpox, &c.) ʼ; Ku. pasāro ʻ extension, bigness, extension of family or property, lineage, family, household ʼ; N. pasār ʻ extension ʼ; B. pasār ʻ extent of practice in business, popularity ʼ, Or. pasāra; H. pasārā m. ʻ stretching out, expansion ʼ (→ P. pasārā m.; S. pasāro m. ʻ expansion, crowd ʼ), G. pasār, °rɔ m., M. pasārā; -- K. pasôru m. ʻ petty shopkeeper ʼ; P. pahārā m. ʻ goldsmith's workshop ʼ; A. pohār ʻ small shop ʼ; -- ← Centre: S. pasāru m. ʻ spices ʼ; P. pasār -- haṭṭā m. ʻ druggist's shop ʼ; -- X paṇyaśālā -- : Ku. pansārī f. ʻ grocer's shop ʼ.CDIAL 8839 prasārin ʻ spreading out ʼ PārGr̥. [prasāra -- ]
              Ku.gng. pasāri ʻ shopkeeper ʼ, A. pohāri; B. pasāri ʻ druggist, petty trader ʼ; Or. pasāri ʻ druggist, pedlar ʼ, f. °ruṇī, H. M. pasārī m. ʻ seller of spices ʼ (→ S. P. pasārī m.). -- X paṇyaśālā -- : N. pansāri ʻ grocer ʼ, H. pansārī, pãs° m. ʻ seller of spices ʼ (→ P. pansārī m.).

              --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "Arvind!" <arvind_vyas@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Lakshmi,
              >
              >
              > The word is derived from Sanskrit paNyazAlI; the one who has a paNya zAlA (shop) - used mainly for gorcers.
              >
              > http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.10:1:493.dasahindi
              >
              > Sk. paNya = Saleable, vendible.
              >
              > Note that I am using HK notation.
              >
              > Hope this clarifies.
              >
              > Best regards,
              > Arvind Vyas
              > --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "Lakshmi" <lsrinivas@> wrote:
              > >
              > > What does the Hindi word (or term) 'pansari' signify? Different dictionaries give different meanings: from one who helps irrigation to messenger to seller of spices and medicinal herbs.
              > >
              > > Can somebody comment?
              > >
              > > Lakshmi Srinivas
              > >
              >
            • Suzanne Redalia
              Is is possible that bania (shopkeeper) is derived from Sanskrit pa (guard, owner) ?
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 2, 2013
                Is is possible that 'bania' (shopkeeper) is derived from Sanskrit 'pa' (guard, owner) ?


                On Feb 28, 2013, at 2:45 AM, Rajan Menon wrote:

                 

                Hai,
                I wish to add the following:
                The ancient term "Panis" (probably traders) from the vedic period which is now known as "Bania"-shopkeeper. The term may have evolved from "pan".
                "paan" in Hispanic signifies bread.
                Dr.Loganathan may have some comments on links to ancient Sumerian.

                Thanks,

                Rajan


                On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 3:51 AM, Arvind! <arvind_vyas@...> wrote:
                 

                Hi Lakshmi,

                The word is derived from Sanskrit paNyazAlI; the one who has a paNya zAlA (shop) - used mainly for gorcers.

                http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.10:1:493.dasahindi

                Sk. paNya = Saleable, vendible.

                Note that I am using HK notation.

                Hope this clarifies.

                Best regards,
                Arvind Vyas


                --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "Lakshmi" wrote:
                >
                > What does the Hindi word (or term) 'pansari' signify? Different dictionaries give different meanings: from one who helps irrigation to messenger to seller of spices and medicinal herbs.
                >
                > Can somebody comment?
                >
                > Lakshmi Srinivas
                >





              • radha_canada
                Hello Shri Sujay Rao Mandavilli, On page 19 of your paper (Alphabetic scripts and other forms of literacy in post Harappan India ...) you say Taxila (now in
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 3, 2013

                  Hello Shri Sujay Rao Mandavilli,

                  On page 19 of your paper (Alphabetic scripts and other forms of literacy in post Harappan India ...) you say "Taxila (now in Afghanistan) ...".   

                  In your other paper too (Syncretism and Acculturation ...) you make a similar statement "The Taxila University (now in Afghanistan)..."

                  Taxila is not in Afghanistan but is in Pakistan, not far from (around 30 km north west of) the capital city of Islamabad.  
                  Thanks and regards,
                  Radhakrishna Warrier

                  --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, sujay rao <sujayrao2000@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Literacy in pre-Buddhist India (before 600
                  > BC)
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > Please find my collection of papers on
                  > literacy in Pre-Buddhist India
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > Before mature phase of Indus valley
                  > civilization (before 2600 BC)
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > -         
                  > There are some potters marks
                  > but none qualify as full writing
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > Indus valley civilization (2600 BC to 1900
                  > BC)
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > The reconfirmation
                  > and reinforcement of the Indus script thesis (very logical and self
                  > explanatory paper)
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > http://www.scribd.com/doc/46387240/Sujay-Indus-Script-Final-Version-Final-Final
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > The
                  > reintroduction of the lost manuscript hypothesis (the case for this thesis
                  > has obviously become much stronger in the recent past)
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > http://www.scribd.com/doc/111707419/Sujay-Indus-Reintroducing-Lost-Manuscript-Hypothesis
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > Post-Harappan India (1600 BC to 600 BC)
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > Literacy in
                  > post-Harappan india (obviously literacy in post-Harappan India existed in
                  > certain pockets & were limited to very small sections of society- alphabetic
                  > scripts were brought from West Asia and the Indus script also continued â€"
                  > this a very logical and self-explanatory paper and anyone can cross-verify
                  > the conclusions)
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > http://www.scribd.com/doc/127306265/Sujay-Post-Harappan-Literacy-and-origin-of-Brahmi
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  > Sujay Rao Mandavilli
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- On Wed, 2/27/13, Rajan Menon vajradanta5@... wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Rajan Menon vajradanta5@...
                  > Subject: Re: [Ind-Arch] Meaning of 'pansari'
                  > To: IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 10:41 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Pansaara in Malayalam means sugar.Panasa in Smskrt means the Bread Fruit or Jaka tree.Phanas in Marathi is the Jack Fruit or Jack Fruit tree.
                  >
                  > I will investigate further as to Hindi.
                  > Rajan Menon 
                  >
                  > On Tue, Feb 26, 2013 at 10:31 AM, Lakshmi lsrinivas@... wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > What does the Hindi word (or term) 'pansari' signify? Different dictionaries give different meanings: from one who helps irrigation to messenger to seller of spices and medicinal herbs.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Can somebody comment?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Lakshmi Srinivas
                  >
                • sujay rao
                  Regret the error ... From: radha_canada Subject: [Ind-Arch] Re: Literacy in Pre-Buddhist India To: IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 5, 2013
                    Regret the error

                    --- On Sun, 3/3/13, radha_canada <radha_canada@...> wrote:

                    From: radha_canada <radha_canada@...>
                    Subject: [Ind-Arch] Re: Literacy in Pre-Buddhist India
                    To: IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sunday, March 3, 2013, 9:15 PM

                     


                    Hello Shri Sujay Rao Mandavilli,

                    On page 19 of your paper (Alphabetic scripts and other forms of literacy in post Harappan India ...) you say "Taxila (now in Afghanistan) ...".   

                    In your other paper too (Syncretism and Acculturation ...) you make a similar statement "The Taxila University (now in Afghanistan)..."

                    Taxila is not in Afghanistan but is in Pakistan, not far from (around 30 km north west of) the capital city of Islamabad.  
                    Thanks and regards,
                    Radhakrishna Warrier

                    --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, sujay rao <sujayrao2000@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Literacy in pre-Buddhist India (before 600
                    > BC)
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Please find my collection of papers on
                    > literacy in Pre-Buddhist India
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Before mature phase of Indus valley
                    > civilization (before 2600 BC)
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > -         
                    > There are some potters marks
                    > but none qualify as full writing
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Indus valley civilization (2600 BC to 1900
                    > BC)
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > The reconfirmation
                    > and reinforcement of the Indus script thesis (very logical and self
                    > explanatory paper)
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > http://www.scribd.com/doc/46387240/Sujay-Indus-Script-Final-Version-Final-Final
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > The
                    > reintroduction of the lost manuscript hypothesis (the case for this thesis
                    > has obviously become much stronger in the recent past)
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > http://www.scribd.com/doc/111707419/Sujay-Indus-Reintroducing-Lost-Manuscript-Hypothesis
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Post-Harappan India (1600 BC to 600 BC)
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Literacy in
                    > post-Harappan india (obviously literacy in post-Harappan India existed in
                    > certain pockets & were limited to very small sections of society- alphabetic
                    > scripts were brought from West Asia and the Indus script also continued â€"
                    > this a very logical and self-explanatory paper and anyone can cross-verify
                    > the conclusions)
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > http://www.scribd.com/doc/127306265/Sujay-Post-Harappan-Literacy-and-origin-of-Brahmi
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Sujay Rao Mandavilli
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Wed, 2/27/13, Rajan Menon vajradanta5@... wrote:
                    >
                    > From: Rajan Menon vajradanta5@...
                    > Subject: Re: [Ind-Arch] Meaning of 'pansari'
                    > To: IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 10:41 PM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Pansaara in Malayalam means sugar.Panasa in Smskrt means the Bread Fruit or Jaka tree.Phanas in Marathi is the Jack Fruit or Jack Fruit tree.
                    >
                    > I will investigate further as to Hindi.
                    > Rajan Menon 
                    >
                    > On Tue, Feb 26, 2013 at 10:31 AM, Lakshmi lsrinivas@... wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > What does the Hindi word (or term) 'pansari' signify? Different dictionaries give different meanings: from one who helps irrigation to messenger to seller of spices and medicinal herbs.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Can somebody comment?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Lakshmi Srinivas
                    >
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