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Re: Fwd: Indus-like inscription on South Indian pottery from Thailand: smithy alloy-maker

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  • Ancient
    Comment: The two glyphs on the Thai pottery as on other megalithic pottery relate to the pictographs showing: 1)backbone; 2)corner. The homonymous words used
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 17, 2013
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      Comment:
      The two glyphs on the Thai pottery as on other megalithic pottery relate to the pictographs showing: 1)backbone; 2)corner. The homonymous words used in mleccha, respectively, are: baraDo 'spine, backbone';
      (Gujarati tribe like KUTCHI KANBIes / KUNBIes decended from Indus velly regions of Hindukush -Himalaya region and PUNJAB - regions of pakistan use those tribal words in present language word BaraDo -BARAD BHANGI NAKHI- Brocken) - means KED/KAMAR Backbone specifically of LUMBER REGION)
      panzur 'skeleton'; (Gujarati tribe words like PANJUR - PANJARu means skeleton specifically ribs of chest rigion) kanac 'corner'. The rebus readings relate to smithy 'pasra'; bharat 'mixed alloy' (Gujarati tribe words bharat); kancu (Gujarati tribe words KANSU)' bronze'. Thus the Thai pottery inscription is a calling card of a smithy artisan detailing his professional competence: working on mixed alloy, bronze in a smithy.
      Pictograph 1: baraḍo = spine;(Gujarati tribe words baraDo -BARAD) backbone; the back; baraḍo thābaḍavo = lit. (Gujarati tribe words baraDo -BARAD - THABADVO/ THABADVu) to strike on the backbone or back; hence, to encourage; baraḍo bhāre thato = lit. to have a painful backbone, i.e. to do something which will call for a severe beating (Gujarati tribe words baraDo -BARAD - THABADVi/ THABADVu)(G.lex.)bārṇe, bāraṇe = an offering of food to a demon; a meal after fasting, a breakfast (Tu.lex.) barada, barda, birada = a vow (G.lex.)bharaḍo a devotee of S'iva; a man of the bharaḍā caste in the bra_hman.as (G.) baraṛ = name of a caste of jat- around Bhaṭiṇḍa; bararaṇḍā melā = a special fair held in spring (P.lex.) bharāḍ = a religious service or entertainment performed by a bharāḍi_; consisting of singing the praises of some idol or god with playing on the d.aur (drum) and dancing; an order of aṭharā akhād.e = 18 gosāyi_ group; bharād. and bhāratī are two of the 18 orders of gosāyi_ (M.lex.)

      Rebus: bhāraṇ = to bring out from a kiln (G.) bāraṇiyo =(Gujarati tribe words BHARAnio -who fills) one whose profession it is to sift ashes or dust in a goldsmith's workshop (G.lex.) In the Punjab, the mixed alloys were generally called, bharat (Gujarati tribe words BHARAT as a verb/Bharanu as noun - to be filled up) (5 copper, 4 zinc and 1 tin). In Bengal, an alloy called bharan or toul was created by adding some brass or zinc into pure bronze. bharata = casting metals in moulds; bharavum = (Gujarati tribe words BHARAVUm -to fill up) (to fill in; to put in; to pour into (G.lex.)Bengali. ভরন [ bharana ] n an inferior metal obtained from an alloy of coper, zinc and tin.


      --- In IndiaArchaeology@yahoogroups.com, "S. Kalyanaraman" wrote:
      >
      > April 7, 2010
      >
      > Indus-like inscription on South Indian pottery from Thailand
      >
      > IRAVATHAM MAHADEVAN
      >
      > http://beta.thehindu.com/multimedia/dynamic/00102/TH08_POTTERY_1_102625f.jpgPottery
      > Inscription from Thailand with Indus-like symbols, probably on South
      > Indian Megalithic Pottery.
      >
      > A fragmentary pottery inscription was found during excavations conducted by
      > the Thai Fine Arts at Phu Khao Thong in Thailand about three years ago. (Dr.
      > Berenice Bellina of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique,
      > France, sent me a photograph of the object: Figure 1)
      >
      > The discovery of a Tamil-Brahmi pottery inscription of about the second
      > century CE at the same site was reported earlier (The Hindu, July 16, 2006).
      > One can presume that the present inscription is also from the Tamil country
      > and belongs approximately to the same period. The two characters incised on
      > the pottery now reported are not in the Brahmi script. They appear to be
      > graffiti symbols of the type seen on the South Indian megalithic pottery of
      > the Iron Age-Early Historical Period (second century BCE to third century
      > CE).
      >
      > What makes the discovery exciting is that the two symbols on the pottery
      > resemble the Indus script, and even the sequence of the pair can be found in
      > the Indus texts, especially those from Harappa.
      >
      > The symbol looking vaguely like an ‘N' appears to be the same as the Indus
      > signs 47 or 48 (in Figure 3). Professor B.B. Lal, former Director-General of
      > the Archaeological Survey of India, showed that these Indus signs have a
      > remarkable resemblance to the megalithic symbol occurring at Sanur, near
      > Tindivanam, and elsewhere in Tamil Nadu (Figure 2). More recently, the same
      > symbol has turned up on two pottery fragments from Pattanam in Kerala
      > (probably the same as Musiri of the Sangam Age). I have compared the symbols
      > with the Indus signs depicting a seated anthropomorphic deity.
      >
      > The symbol on the Thai pottery resembles a diamond. It occurs in the Indus
      > script in diamond or oval forms (Signs 261 and 373 in Figure 3).
      >
      > What is extraordinary about the present find is the occurrence of the two
      > symbols on the pottery in the same sequence as found in the Indus texts (see
      > for example texts 4589 and 5265 from Harappa, Figure 3). The Thai pottery
      > has only two symbols. Another symbol might have been lost owing to the
      > fragmentary state of the pottery.
      >
      > Sequences such as this on the Thai pottery and those reported on the
      > inscribed Neolithic stone axe from Sembiyan Kandiyur and on megalithic
      > pottery from Sulur (near Coimbatore in Tamil Nadu) provide evidence for the
      > survival of the Indus script in South India during the megalithic age, and
      > for the possibility that the languages of the Indus Civilisation and South
      > India belong to the same family, namely Dravidian.
      >
      > (The sign and text numbers are cited from The Indus Script: Texts,
      > Concordance and Tables, by Iravatham Mahadevan (1977). The author is
      > Honorary Consultant of the Indus Research Centre at Roja Muthiah Research
      > Library in Chennai.)
      >
      > http://beta.thehindu.com/arts/history-and-culture/article391104.ece
      > Comment: The two glyphs on the Thai pottery as on other megalithic pottery
      > relate to the pictographs showing: 1)backbone; 2)corner. The homonymous
      > words used in mleccha, respectively, are: baraDo 'spine, backbone'; panzur
      > 'skeleton'; kanac 'corner'. The rebus readings relate to smithy 'pasra';
      > bharat 'mixed alloy'; kancu 'bronze'. Thus the Thai pottery inscription is a
      > calling card of a smithy artisan detailing his professional competence:
      > working on mixed alloy, bronze in a smithy.
      > Pictograph 1: baraḍo = spine; backbone; the back; baraḍo thābaḍavo = lit. to
      > strike on the backbone or back; hence, to encourage; baraḍo bhāre thato =
      > lit. to have a painful backbone, i.e. to do something which will call for a
      > severe beating (G.lex.)bārṇe, bāraṇe = an offering of food to a demon; a
      > meal after fasting, a breakfast (Tu.lex.) barada, barda, birada = a vow
      > (G.lex.)bharaḍo a devotee of S’iva; a man of the bharaḍā caste in the
      > bra_hman.as (G.) baraṛ = name of a caste of jat- around Bhaṭiṇḍa; bararaṇḍā
      > melā = a special fair held in spring (P.lex.) bharāḍ = a religious service
      > or entertainment performed by a bharāḍi_; consisting of singing the praises
      > of some idol or god with playing on the d.aur (drum) and dancing; an order
      > of aṭharā akhād.e = 18 gosāyi_ group; bharād. and bhāratī are two of the 18
      > orders of gosāyi_ (M.lex.)
      >
      > Rebus: bhāraṇ = to bring out from a kiln (G.) bāraṇiyo = one whose
      > profession it is to sift ashes or dust in a goldsmith’s workshop (G.lex.) In
      > the Punjab, the mixed alloys were generally called, bharat (5 copper, 4 zinc
      > and 1 tin). In Bengal, an alloy called bharan or toul was created by adding
      > some brass or zinc into pure bronze. bharata = casting metals in moulds;
      > bharavum = to fill in; to put in; to pour into (G.lex.)Bengali. ভরন [
      > bharana ] n an inferior metal obtained from an alloy of coper, zinc and tin.
      >
      > K. panzur m. ‘skeleton’; Or. pañjarā ‘skeleton, ribs (CDIAL 7685)
      >
      > Rebus: pasra ‘smithy’ (Santali)
      >
      > Pictogaph 2: kana, kanac = corner (Santali); kan~cu = bronze (Te.)
      >
      > Kalyanaraman
      > 8 April 2010
      >
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