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2,450-year-old Magadhan road excavated

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  • ymalaiya
    Scientists dig out 2,450-year-old civilization in Bangladesh A group of Bangladeshi scientists dug out an ancient road in northern Narsingdi, 50 km northeast
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 2 4:46 PM
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      Scientists dig out 2,450-year-old civilization in Bangladesh
      A group of Bangladeshi scientists dug out an ancient road in
      northern Narsingdi, 50 km northeast of the capital Dhaka, suggesting
      2,450-year-old civilization which redefines the history of eastern
      India.

      A group of Bangladeshi scientists dug out an ancient road in
      northern Narsingdi, 50 km northeast of the capital Dhaka, suggesting
      2,450-year-old civilization which redefines the history of eastern
      India.

      A team of archaeologists of Jahangirnagar University discoveredthe
      18/16-meter and 27-centimeter thick road about a month ago dating
      back to 450 BC.

      An important trade center flourished in Narsingdi, on the bank of
      might river Meghna, which maintained contemporary contacts withother
      countries in South Asia and Roman civilization through waterways.

      The excavation of the country's oldest road, a fortified citadel and
      a raft of artifacts dating back to 450 BC in Wari village of Belabo
      sub-district, about 35 km from the capital, promised to redefine the
      history of eastern India and embolden thetheory of the Brahmaputra
      civilization.

      Dr. Sufi Mustafizur Rahman, associate professor of Jahangirnagar
      University, who led the group of archaeologists, said Friday that
      examination of charcoal samples from the site in 2001 by Dutch
      scientists also spoke of human habitation and industry in the area
      in 450 BC.

      After finding potteries and other archaeological treasures three
      years ago from Wari village and Bateswar village in 2000 and2001,
      archaeologists suggested Buddhism dominated life in the area.

      The finds of the road and a citadel fortified by bunkers in theWari
      village encouraged the scientists to go on with the work of
      discovery.

      Dr. Rahman believed the citadel formed the eastern limit of Mauryan
      Empire.

      "I think the citadel ran very organized administrative activities
      with business activities around it," he said.

      "Discovery of the road will revolutionize the early archaeology of
      eastern India as whole since no road was found in the Trans-Ganetic
      valley earlier,"said Dr. Dilip Kumar Chakravarti, who teaches
      archaeology at Cambridge University.

      The finds dwarf Bangladesh's ancient hubs of Pundarabardhan
      inBogra's Mahastangarh that dates back to 370 BC, the Buddhist
      seatof learning in Paharpur, Comilla, 60 miles east of Dhaka, of the
      8th century and Buddhist center of Mainamoti that flourished between
      7th and 12th century.

      Source:Xinhua

      http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/200404/02/eng20040402_139287.shtml
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