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Re: [Imperial-Club] Re: Leaking Fuel Flex-line/Also Inspect Fuel Filter Hose Extensions

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  • Paul Wentink
    I also like those filters. I have not retro-fitted any of them, but that isn t a bad idea. They are standard on my 55 & 56. I also have experience with them
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 1, 2012
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      I also like those filters. I have not retro-fitted any of them, but that isn't a bad idea. They are standard on my '55 & '56. I also have experience with them on other old cars. One thing to be careful about is that the glass bowl is made to be easily removed in order to dump out the debris and clean the element. This was considered part of regular servicing. It is highly advisable to find the correct gasket for whatever "bowl filter" you have or may plan to use prior to performing this procedure as many of them are not available. Often the original was made of cork which has since dried out. When the bowl is removed the cork falls apart and a new gasket is required in order to run the car. I have seen replacements made of cork and also of neoprene. Just make sure it is fresh and that it fits before taking anything apart. Some of us are skilled at making our own. The integrity of the seal is critical in order to be safe. On some old vehicles the bowl is part of the fuel pump and at the fuel inlet rather than being placed after the pump which means a leaking seal will prevent the pump from pulling fuel as noted below regarding a leaking flex-line.

      Paul W.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: retromobilia <retromobilia@...>
      To: Imperial-Club <Imperial-Club@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wed, Oct 31, 2012 4:24 pm
      Subject: Re: [Imperial-Club] Re: Leaking Fuel Flex-line/Also Inspect Fuel Filter Hose Extensions




      Paul,
      While it is not original, in some cases and years, I like to install on all my cars the see through glass & ceramic filter (a-la 50's style) at the engine and plumbed steel from the pump (some have been plastic bowls). Bradded flex hose into the pump from the chassis. And at the tank a modern filter with steel 7 brass connected fittings. Occasionally I can find a reasonable cartridge style for the tank location. In this type when replacing the cartridge it is possible to examine it for what if any contaminants there may be lurking in the tank.
      John
      PS: I use real gas whenever possible.....(club should lobby that for old-timers.)

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Paul Wentink" <randalpark@...>
      To: Imperial-Club@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2012 5:18:29 AM
      Subject: Re: [Imperial-Club] Re: Leaking Fuel Flex-line/Also Inspect Fuel Filter Hose Extensions

      The fuel pump on this car must have been amazing!

      That particular flex-line is located on all cars between the line from the tank and the pump. The slightest leak will cause the pump to pull air instead of gas. This is "on purpose" since the pump is usually mounted on the engine and also to prevent exactly what the poster pointed out. However, there is another issue here. Most of our cars built in the '60s came from the factory with a rubber line on each end of the fuel filter. For 1962 and 1963 (maybe other years as well), this is unwisely placed directly over the passenger's side exhaust manifold. When the cars were new every filter came with both pieces of new hose and new clamps. These days these "extension hoses" may have been left in place for years and were NOT meant to last. Many of us have moved the filter to a different location to prevent a fire should one of these hoses deteriorate and leak onto the manifold making for a dangerous potential for fire. By 1965 the filter was moved back to the fr ont of the engine (like 1959 and 1960) where if leaking, it would not as likely spray directly onto the manifold. I have known of cars that have sprung fuel leaks, dousing the entire engine and engine compartment while not catching fire. Still the potential exists and should be prevented in every possible way.

      Paul W.

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