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Re: [Imperial-Club] Re: 67 fuel delivery problem(kind of long)

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  • Mark Souders
    This thread is becoming a bit muddy to me. I think the original concern was replacing the fuel pump push rod. There is one way to economically replace the push
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 1 4:38 AM
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      This thread is becoming a bit muddy to me. I think the original concern was replacing the fuel pump push rod. There is one way to economically replace the push rod. That is through the plugged hole under the fuel pump. Those of you who have never had to replace that push rod, you have been lucky so far. The rod will almost never wear beyond use while the car is parked in the driveway. When it fails, it will more likely be while cruising down the highway late Saturday night, or while trying to leave a car show or cruise night as the Chevy guys look on.
      Several years ago, I had the same problem removing the plug for the push rod, on a 69 Polara 383. I rounded out the plug, too. The solution for me was to acquire a piece of hex steel and weld it into the wallowed-out hole in the plug. The heat from the welding probably loosened up the plug, then I put a socket and ratchet onto the welded-on hex piece and turned out the plug. No damage to the threads or the block. The push rod was about 3/16 inch shorter than the new one, and that was just enough to render the car inoperable.
      I also had the same problem with the rod in my 300H. That time the plug came out easily, though. Both times, I had to be brought home on the hook.
      Good luck and best regards,
      Mark Souders







      -----Original Message-----
      From: socalcarnut <dickb@...>
      To: Imperial-Club@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, May 31, 2010 12:50 pm
      Subject: [Imperial-Club] Re: 67 fuel delivery problem(kind of long)






      I read all the other responses, but I don't see an answer to your question #1: Yes, you can change the fuel pump without removing the access plug. Usually, you can push the actuating rod up out of the way of the pump lever by sliding the lever under the rod and then moving the pump body in such a way as to make the rod go back up into it's hole. The other method is to push the rod up with your finger after coating it with some wheel bearing grease, which will make it stick in position long enough to quickly install the pump. I know on your car you have to work with a mirror to see what is going on, but it can be done, I assure you.

      I also can say that in many, many of these and other cars with the similar design, I have NEVER had to replace one of those rods because it was worn out.

      Dick Benjamin

      --- In Imperial-Club@yahoogroups.com, "Clay Smith" <imperialman67@...> wrote:
      >
      > My 67 has been trying my patience .

      > 1) Can a fuel pump be installed with out removing this access plug?







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    • Sonny Moorehouse
      I like your solution great Idea and that is what I thought the thread was about as well. fuel pump push rod right. Because you dont have to remove rod to
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 1 7:28 AM
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        I like your solution great Idea and that is what I thought the thread was about as well. fuel pump push rod right. Because you dont have to remove rod to install pump just use some axle grease to hold the rod back while you install pump 

        Sincerly Sonny Moorehouse


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      • john sadowski
        The original issue was the car wouldn t start after having the fuel tank resealed. Based on something read in the archives, it was assumed that either the pump
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 1 9:10 AM
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          The original issue was the car wouldn't start after having the fuel tank resealed. Based on something read in the archives, it was assumed that either the pump or pushrod was bad. As most know, the pushrod very seldom goes bad & if the car was running before having the fuel tank serviced, I'd be surprised is either the pushrod or pump is bad.
          I'm thinking that one of the vent lines is plugged with sealer & causing no fuel delivery.

          John
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Sonny Moorehouse
          To: Imperial-Club@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 7:28 AM
          Subject: Re: [Imperial-Club] Re: 67 fuel delivery problem(kind of long)



          I like your solution great Idea and that is what I thought the thread was about as well. fuel pump push rod right. Because you dont have to remove rod to install pump just use some axle grease to hold the rod back while you install pump

          Sincerly Sonny Moorehouse

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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