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Antoinette danced and walked so gracefully

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  • axel
    Jester, I quite agree with what you write. Inspite of all the constraints of her queenly costume, Marie Antoinette not only danced gracefully, but she was
    Message 1 of 17 , Apr 1, 2013
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      Jester, I quite agree with what you write. Inspite of all the constraints of her queenly costume, Marie Antoinette not only danced gracefully, but she was said to walk better than any woman in France. She was said to be grace in motion. Some say it was Marie Antoinette in motion that so distinguished her as the Queen of her court. It's been written that "As you would offer another woman a chair you would offer Marie Antoinette a throne".

      Axel

      --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "axel" <Rand103242@...> wrote:
      >
      > You have som much information! It's absolutly mind boggling. Makes me absolutely gleefull. I really wouldn't doubt it if she had scoliosis, and it'd be understandable that they wouldn't really know what to do with it. So they hid it. Poor girl, just can't catch a break. I feel bad for all thos women the Grand corps would have deformed the ribs and organs. I don't even want to imagine how they managed to dance so gracefully in such things. And then you need to add a twelve foot diameter of skirt to it as well as twenty or more pounds of
      > material. I do not envy her in the least.
      >
      > I can't even begin to imagine what pregnancy in such costumes must have been like.
      >
      > What I would love to find one day, is a breakdown of her costumes. You know? I diagram of how it's all built up. The corset, skirts, bustle and all. It's just such an detailed and ornate thing. I still can't believe they put vegitables in their hair. Ah well, to each her own.
      >
      > Thank you so much for inviting me to your group, I hope I don't dissapoint.
      >
      > ****
      >
      > The above post is by 0Jester0 from a chat I've had with 0Jester0 at DeviantArt.
      >
      > I hope 0Jester0 joins our group to continue this conversation.
      >
      > Axel
      >
      >
      > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "axel" <Rand103242@> wrote:
      > >
      > > "When Marie Antoinette first arrived in the court of France, she was expected to wear the tightly laced grand corps. Not only was this corset very stiff and uncomfortable, it often "severely restricted its wearer's movements, especially around the arms" according to the Marquise de La Tour du Pin. Others reported side effects like "heart palpitations, asthma, vapors, and stinking breath".
      > >
      > > "With the oppressive heat of her first summer in France, Marie Antoinette abandoned her corset and went without. She was thin enough to do so but it caused outrage amongst the courtiers. This juicy gossip of MA's corset rebellion quickly circulated through the courts of Europe. It was said that: "Marie Antoinette's waist was growing misshapen, and her right shoulder out of kilter" (Comtesse de Noailles) and "one of the future queen's shoulder blades was more protruding than the other" (quote not attributed). (Source: "Queen of Fashion" by Caroline Weber, page 69).
      > >
      > > "I couldn't help but wonder whether Marie Antoinette may have had scoliosis, a curvature of the spine. With this condition, it is common for one shoulder to protrude or sit higher than the other. (I was diagnosed with scoliosis when I was 13 and it was my uneven shoulders that was the first hint of a problem. I had to wear a steel corset not nearly as beautiful as the iron one shown above. I'm pretty sure that is why I have an obsession with corsets in my artwork and writing).
      > >
      > > "I suppose there will never be a definitive answer to this question since so few MA garments survived the scourge of the French revolution. But there was an apple-green bodice belonging to Marie Antoinette that still exists somewhere.
      > >
      > > " "An English lord touring Marie Antoinette's apartments after she and her family had been sent to jail asked to examine a bodice of hers that revolutionary loots had left lying on the floor. He explained to his puzzled French companions that he had long ago heard tales of the young woman's misshapen right shoulder--attributable to her avoidance of the grand corps--and was curious to see whether her bodice was padded to disguise the deficiency". (Source: Queen of Fashion by Caroline Weber, page 69). Weber does not reveal whether or not her apple green bodice was padded or not.
      > >
      > > "I'll have to do more research to find out. If anyone knows where this bodice is, please let me know. The credit that accompanies the photo of this apple green bodice in Weber's book reports the photo is from the NY Public Library but obviously they don't own the garment itself.
      > >
      > > Posted by Ingrid Mida at 9:38 AM
      > > Sunday, February 22, 2009
      > >
      > > *************************
      > >
      > > The post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in context at Ingrid's Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" – Html or link: http://fashionismymuse.blogspot.com/
      > >
      > > Please also see the artwork for this post – photo "Ingrid 21 – French iron corset" in the "Ingrid Mida – Antoinette" photo album folder I've set up, in "Photos" for this group -
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/photos/album/0/list The image is of a French iron corset, 1580-1600, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute.
      > >
      > > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 21st of a series of reposts about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our group. Your comments are most welcome.
      > >
      > > This post relates to the 3rd post in this series "Marie Antoinette's Corset Rebellion" - see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/9124 (below)
      > >
      > > Axel
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Axel" <Rand103242@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > "To French aristocrats, a tightly corseted body represented "the
      > > > norms of stiffness and self-control" expected of the ruling caste.
      > > > Marie-Antoinette's position required her to wear a form of corset
      > > > called a grand corps. This more rigid form of corset was the "mark of
      > > > supreme distinction". Only France's greatest princesses had the right
      > > > to wear this undergarment on a regular basis. Other noblewomen were
      > > > allowed to wear it only on the day of their presentation at court and
      > > > after that, only at specially designated formal functions. This
      > > > corset was stiffer than a regular corset and made breathing, eating
      > > > and even moving one's arms difficult.
      > > >
      > > > "The grand corps was described by the Marquise de La Tour du Pinto
      > > > be "a specially made corset, without shoulder straps, laced up the
      > > > back, but tight enough so that the lacings, four fingers wide on the
      > > > bottom, allowed for a glimpse of a chemise of such fine batiste that
      > > > it would be readily apparent to everyone if one's skin underneath was
      > > > not sufficiently white...The front of the corset was laced, as it
      > > > were, with rows of diamonds."
      > > >
      > > > "Marie Antoinette did not like wearing the grand corps, especially as
      > > > the corsets she was used to wearing in Austria were far more
      > > > flexible. A few months after arriving in France, she rebelled against
      > > > wearing the grand corps and since she was thin enough to wear her
      > > > gowns without this tortuous undergarment, she went without. This
      > > > rebellious act was considered a breach of etiquette of considerable
      > > > proportions. The court took to whispering about Marie Antoinette's
      > > > misshapen waist and right shoulder and this gossip was repeated far
      > > > beyond the court eventually reaching her mother Marie Theresa,
      > > > Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary. It took diplomatic
      > > > intervention by the Austrian ambassador to convince Marie Antoinette
      > > > to resume wearing the grand corps on a regular basis.
      > > >
      > > > "Later in her life, Marie Antoinette took to wearing a thin white
      > > > chemise dress with a ribbon sash. This airy, ruffled informal dress
      > > > did not require a corset and was widely copied.
      > > >
      > > > Sources:
      > > > Queen of Fashion, Caroline Weber, Picador, New York, 2006
      > > > Marie-Antoinette Style, Adrien Goetz, Assouline, New York 2005
      > > > Corsets and Crinolines, Norah Waugh, Routledge Theatre Arts Books,
      > > > New York 2004
      > > > The Corset, A Cultural History, Valerie Steele, Yale University
      > > > Press, 2001
      > > >
      > > > Posted by Ingrid Mida at 12:45 PM
      > > > Monday, October 13, 2008
      > > >
      > > > *************************
      > > >
      > > > The post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in
      > > > context at Ingrid's Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" – Html or
      > > > link: http://fashionismymuse.blogspot.com/
      > > > Please also see the artwork for this post – photo Ingrid 3 in
      > > > the "Ingrid Mida – Corsetted Marie Antoinette" photo album folder
      > > > I've set up, in photos for this group -
      > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/photos/album/
      > > > 0/list
      > > >
      > > > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the
      > > > kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 3rd of a series of reposts
      > > > about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our
      > > > group. Your comments are most welcome.
      > > >
      > > > Axel
      > > >
      > >
      >
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