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Re: Kathryn Davis's Versailles - Profound look at MA

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  • Patricia
    This sounds like a good one, Jan. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on it with us. I will find it on Amazon.com. Has anyone heard recently of any sightings
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 4, 2011
      This sounds like a good one, Jan. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on it with us. I will find it on Amazon.com.

      Has anyone heard recently of any "sightings" of Antoinette?
      I had heard there is a magazine with an article about someone
      seeing her in the spirit form recently. Just wondering. It is my belief that any place where someone has spent a lot of time will carry
      their energy signature and especially if that person experienced a particularly violent or tragic death. Hence, the many claims of
      "ghost" sightings of Antoinette. Those who are sensitive psychically
      can pick up on these energies quite easily.

      I have been away for some time with my mind on other matters but hope
      to get more involved with this site again.

      kind regards,
      Patricia

      --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "janet f" <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
      >
      > Kathryn Davis is an award winning authoress, having won a Kafka award, the Marion Zabel Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Don't let that prevent you from reading her fifth novel, Versailles, an acutely profound look at Queen Marie Antoinette.
      >
      > This is the best of the Antoinette books that I have read, and I fully understand why this author is award winning. This book touches the heart, and admittedly from the beginning, you know that it is about soul.
      >
      > For those who love the Queen this will be an exciting and interesting read to contemplate for it is not the usual, chronological order series of events that occurred in the Royal Family's life. This is a penetrating look at the Queen's inner soul, her heart, and her mind.
      >
      > She notices details that most authors ignore, but which were very important and significant to me. I especially liked her sense of what had happened to the Chateau itself after the Family had been forced to leave it. It is one of the more poignant looks at how devastating this revolution had become, all the damage that is a natural result of years of neglect and despair.
      >
      > The final hours with Antoinette are especially touching, and I am in agreement with her thinking that Antoinette was a wisp of a woman, no longer the vibrant young girl who had partied, danced, flirted, and charmed and irritated her way through the great Palace.
      >
      > In the end, I loved this book. No author has quite captivated Antoinette so well as this one has. Please do yourself a favor and savor this glimpse into the life of a much maligned and unhappy woman. Remembering that she did on occasion have great hours of happiness which many of her paintings show.
      >
      > Jan
      >
    • VictoriaB
      This sounds like exactly the type of book I would LOVE to read. The snippets of personality that come through the books I ve read in the past are always what I
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 4, 2011
        This sounds like exactly the type of book I would LOVE to read. The snippets of personality that come through the books I've read in the past are always what I enjoy most....can't wait to check this one out. Thanks!

        --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "janet f" <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
        >
        > Kathryn Davis is an award winning authoress, having won a Kafka award, the Marion Zabel Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Don't let that prevent you from reading her fifth novel, Versailles, an acutely profound look at Queen Marie Antoinette.
        >
        > This is the best of the Antoinette books that I have read, and I fully understand why this author is award winning. This book touches the heart, and admittedly from the beginning, you know that it is about soul.
        >
        > For those who love the Queen this will be an exciting and interesting read to contemplate for it is not the usual, chronological order series of events that occurred in the Royal Family's life. This is a penetrating look at the Queen's inner soul, her heart, and her mind.
        >
        > She notices details that most authors ignore, but which were very important and significant to me. I especially liked her sense of what had happened to the Chateau itself after the Family had been forced to leave it. It is one of the more poignant looks at how devastating this revolution had become, all the damage that is a natural result of years of neglect and despair.
        >
        > The final hours with Antoinette are especially touching, and I am in agreement with her thinking that Antoinette was a wisp of a woman, no longer the vibrant young girl who had partied, danced, flirted, and charmed and irritated her way through the great Palace.
        >
        > In the end, I loved this book. No author has quite captivated Antoinette so well as this one has. Please do yourself a favor and savor this glimpse into the life of a much maligned and unhappy woman. Remembering that she did on occasion have great hours of happiness which many of her paintings show.
        >
        > Jan
        >
      • axel
        Versailles: A Novel by Kathryn Davis is not your everyday historical epic about Marie Antoinette. It tells the story of the ill-fated queen in a series of
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 6, 2011
          "Versailles: A Novel by Kathryn Davis is not your everyday historical epic about Marie Antoinette. It tells the story of the ill-fated queen in a series of scenes and vignettes, supplemented with several poems and play scenes. She begins as a 14 year old girl on her way to the splendid palace of Versailles, and ends as a ghost of her former self, walking up the steps to the guillotine. In between, we learn of her hopes and dreams, her fears, her life as she moves from gilded room to gilded room at Versailles, or breathes the fresh air at her beloved Petit Trianon.

          "This was such a different read for me. I was hesitant at first, because I wasn't sure that the writing style would hold up for the entire novel, but I was pleasantly surprised by how much the prose sucked me into the world Davis has crafted.

          "Although Versailles covered her life from birth to death - and after - it did so in a refreshing, experimental way. Unfortunately, the detailed nature of many historical novels can leave the reader feeling dry and overwhelmed. Davis' brief style was very engaging and a completely different take on how to write a historical story. Most of the vignettes were told from Marie Antoinette's point of view, but it never felt stale or static. Davis carefully cultivated Marie Antoinette's changes and growth, resulting in a human portrait of a woman who gained more courage in several years than many will ever do in a lifetime. Marie Antoinette's words were alternatively charming, passionate, witty - and as the revolution waged on, desperate, somber, and finally, haunting.

          "Unlike a typical historical novel, Davis assumed the reader has a familiarity with the subject. This decision did make for a more lively read, as there didn't need to be additional paragraphs explaining the details of every event in her life. However, this could be a hindrance to those who are not familiar with the history. For example, Davis did not stop to explain that Marie Antoinette had two sons, so the reappearance of "the Dauphin" after he (Louis Joseph) was described as dying may confuse some readers. Davis didn't describe political situations at length, nor did she take much time explaining historical characters... in some ways, felt like a novel for those who have studied her life, or at least the time period. I did appreciate that Davis touched on the subject of historical debate - of course, using Marie Antoinette's witty prose to make her point. Marie Antoinette takes a jab on the speculation surrounding her alleged affair with Axel Fersen: "Nor does it matter, really, if Axel was my lover, in the physical sense at least... It matters to historians, most of them men. It matters to gossips, most of them women. The pleasure is in the speculation... Were we sexually intimate? What difference could it possibly make to you?"

          "This novel may not be for everyone. If you are looking for a detailed fictional account of Marie Antoinette's life, I don't recommend this book. But if you are hoping to find something new in the world of Marie Antoinette fiction, I highly recommend picking it up!

          Posted by Anna Amber at 3:13 PM
          March 6, 2011

          The above quoted is a book review of the novel "Versailles" from a blog I saw today that I thought would interest the group. I want to further commend the blog to our group. The blog is called "Reading Treasure: A Marie Antoinette Book Blog - A book blog about all things Marie Antoinette!" Here is a link to the group - http://vivelaqueen.blogspot.com/2011/03/book-review-versailles-by-kathryn.html

          Thank you Anna Amber!

          I've also posted two covers to the book "Versailles" in the Novels photo album.

          PS - Welcome back, Patricia! Hope you are well and good to see you posting again :)

          Axel

          --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Patricia" <MadameAntoine@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > This sounds like a good one, Jan. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on it with us. I will find it on Amazon.com.
          >
          > Has anyone heard recently of any "sightings" of Antoinette?
          > I had heard there is a magazine with an article about someone
          > seeing her in the spirit form recently. Just wondering. It is my belief that any place where someone has spent a lot of time will carry
          > their energy signature and especially if that person experienced a particularly violent or tragic death. Hence, the many claims of
          > "ghost" sightings of Antoinette. Those who are sensitive psychically
          > can pick up on these energies quite easily.
          >
          > I have been away for some time with my mind on other matters but hope
          > to get more involved with this site again.
          >
          > kind regards,
          > Patricia
          >
          > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "janet f" <janetcfauble@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Kathryn Davis is an award winning authoress, having won a Kafka award, the Marion Zabel Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Don't let that prevent you from reading her fifth novel, Versailles, an acutely profound look at Queen Marie Antoinette.
          > >
          > > This is the best of the Antoinette books that I have read, and I fully understand why this author is award winning. This book touches the heart, and admittedly from the beginning, you know that it is about soul.
          > >
          > > For those who love the Queen this will be an exciting and interesting read to contemplate for it is not the usual, chronological order series of events that occurred in the Royal Family's life. This is a penetrating look at the Queen's inner soul, her heart, and her mind.
          > >
          > > She notices details that most authors ignore, but which were very important and significant to me. I especially liked her sense of what had happened to the Chateau itself after the Family had been forced to leave it. It is one of the more poignant looks at how devastating this revolution had become, all the damage that is a natural result of years of neglect and despair.
          > >
          > > The final hours with Antoinette are especially touching, and I am in agreement with her thinking that Antoinette was a wisp of a woman, no longer the vibrant young girl who had partied, danced, flirted, and charmed and irritated her way through the great Palace.
          > >
          > > In the end, I loved this book. No author has quite captivated Antoinette so well as this one has. Please do yourself a favor and savor this glimpse into the life of a much maligned and unhappy woman. Remembering that she did on occasion have great hours of happiness which many of her paintings show.
          > >
          > > Jan
          > >
          >
        • janet fauble
          Hello Patricia, I am so happy to hear from you again.  I have missed you, but hope that whatever has kept you busy was good and enjoyable.  The book is quite
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 7, 2011
            Hello Patricia, I am so happy to hear from you again.  I have missed you, but hope that whatever has kept you busy was good and enjoyable.  The book is quite deceptive as it is small but has so much depth that it takes some time to read.  I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did.   Jan

            From: Patricia <MadameAntoine@...>
            To: Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2011 7:43 AM
            Subject: Re: Kathryn Davis's Versailles - Profound look at MA

             


            This sounds like a good one, Jan. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on it with us. I will find it on Amazon.com.

            Has anyone heard recently of any "sightings" of Antoinette?
            I had heard there is a magazine with an article about someone
            seeing her in the spirit form recently. Just wondering. It is my belief that any place where someone has spent a lot of time will carry
            their energy signature and especially if that person experienced a particularly violent or tragic death. Hence, the many claims of
            "ghost" sightings of Antoinette. Those who are sensitive psychically
            can pick up on these energies quite easily.

            I have been away for some time with my mind on other matters but hope
            to get more involved with this site again.

            kind regards,
            Patricia

            --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "janet f" <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
            >
            > Kathryn Davis is an award winning authoress, having won a Kafka award, the Marion Zabel Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Don't let that prevent you from reading her fifth novel, Versailles, an acutely profound look at Queen Marie Antoinette.
            >
            > This is the best of the Antoinette books that I have read, and I fully understand why this author is award winning. This book touches the heart, and admittedly from the beginning, you know that it is about soul.
            >
            > For those who love the Queen this will be an exciting and interesting read to contemplate for it is not the usual, chronological order series of events that occurred in the Royal Family's life. This is a penetrating look at the Queen's inner soul, her heart, and her mind.
            >
            > She notices
            details that most authors ignore, but which were very important and significant to me. I especially liked her sense of what had happened to the Chateau itself after the Family had been forced to leave it. It is one of the more poignant looks at how devastating this revolution had become, all the damage that is a natural result of years of neglect and despair.
            >
            > The final hours with Antoinette are especially touching, and I am in agreement with her thinking that Antoinette was a wisp of a woman, no longer the vibrant young girl who had partied, danced, flirted, and charmed and irritated her way through the great Palace.
            >
            > In the end, I loved this book. No author has quite captivated Antoinette so well as this one has. Please do yourself a favor and savor this glimpse into the life of a much maligned and unhappy woman. Remembering that she did on occasion have great hours of happiness which many of her paintings
            show.
            >
            > Jan
            >



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