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Did Antoinette’s perfumed scent cause her capture at Varennes

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  • axel
    Ms Feydeay said smelling the Queen s Wake is as if you re walking past a magnificent bouquet comprising flowers of every season. It has an incredible
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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      "Ms Feydeay said smelling the Queen's Wake is "as if you're walking past a magnificent bouquet comprising flowers of every season. It has an incredible fullness."

      "Marie Antoinette's love of perfumes is believed to be her undoing. Many accounts have been written of the events of 20 June, 1791, when Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and their family retinue attempted to escape to eastern France, where troops loyal to the monarchy were waiting.

      "Their flight was cut off at Varennes where they were recognised and arrested.

      "One version has it that a vigilant chamber-maid, observing the queen's travelling chest packed with several months' supplies of powders, pommades and perfumes, realised that the royal family were making a break for it.

      "Ms Feydeau believes the truth may have been much simpler, however. Late-18th century France was a pungent place, a world of open drains, cesspits and sewers and where taking a bath was a rare indulgence.

      " "The queen's fragrance must have made a strong contrast. I think it may well have been her scent that gave her away, either to other travellers or to people at the inn where they stopped," Ms Feydeau said.

      "Her toilette played as eloquent a part in her fall as it had in her prime. Part of the mythology surrounding the royal family's flight from Paris and capture at Varennes in June 1791 is that it was by Marie Antoinette's perfume that they were recognised; a legend that again makes the queen culpable for her femininity and glamour.

      "The royal couple were taken back to Paris under escort and publicly executed two years later.

      Quoted from article "Perfume that sent Marie Antoinette to guillotine weaves its spell again"
      http://news.scotsman.com/topstories/Perfume-that-sent-Marie-Antoinette.2835707.jp




      --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Patricia" <MadameAntoine@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks for posting this, Axel. I was wondering at what the ingredients were for her scent. As someone who has taken classes in aromatherapy using the essential oils in a healing manner, I would love to try and re-create this scent that was created for her.
      >
      > High quality essential oils can be very expensive, especially the sandalwood and damask rose. I would think that damask rose would also be including in any perfume for Marie Antoinette since she loved roses so much...I would certainly add a hint of rose to the scent.
      >
      > kind regards,
      > Patricia
      >
      > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "axel" <Rand103242@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > This is a book review of Marie Antoinette's perfumer and the scents the Queen enjoyed and brought to her life at Versailles palace and beyond.
      > >
      > > "Jean-Louis Fargeon was the perfumer to Marie Antoinette. Born in 1748, seven years before the birth of the future Queen of France, Jean-Louis was the first-born son in a long line of apothecaries and perfumers. This book follows the trajectory of Jean-Louis' life as he masters the skills of a perfumer, develops his business and serves as perfumer to Marie Antoinette. The history of the French revolution is interwoven into the tale.
      > >
      > > "Title: A Scented Palace, The Secret History of Marie Antoinette's Perfumer
      > > Author: Elisabeth de Feydeau
      > > Translator: Jane Lizop
      > > Publisher: I.B. Tauris, London, New York (2006)
      > > Category: Non-fiction, history, biography
      > > Price: US$22 hardcover (www.amazon.com)
      > > Number of Pages: 114 before appendices, 140 including appendices
      > >
      > > "My favourite passage:
      > > "Finally the perfumer had to reinforce the depth and perfect the harmony of his preparation. Vanilla would lend a warm and delicious touch, soft and velvety, redolent of Marie Antoinette's childhood and her fondness for Viennese pastries, a gourmet hint of sweetness and gentleness. Cedar and sandalwood would add the note of the wooded lanes of the Trianon. Amber and musk would overlay the entire composition with a sensual, animal fervour, and a pinch of benzoin would add warmth and tenacity to the whole." (page 70)
      > >
      > > "Why I chose this book:
      > > A good friend/blogging fan noticed that I was researching and writing about Marie Antoinette in the fall and gave me this book for my birthday.
      > >
      > > "Rating: B
      > > While this book was well-written, I found the volume slim with 114 pages. The footnotes are not extensive and the source of material that this biography is based on is not really clear (other than a mention of Fargeon's papers).
      > >
      > > "The book was amusing but did not really provide much new information about the time period, with the exception of the passages about the toilette preparations of Marie Antoinette. Nevertheless, I think that it is good read for die-hard Marie Antoinette fans. I simply cannot get enough of this fashion icon.
      > > Posted By Ingrid Mida At 8:40 Pm
      > > Sunday, January 25, 2009
      > >
      > > *************************
      > >
      > > The quoted post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in context at Ingrid's
      > > Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" – Html or link: http://fashionismymuse.blogspot.com/
      > > Please also see the artwork for this post – photo "Ingrid 12 – MA: Scented Palace" in the "Ingrid Mida – Antoinette" photo album folder I've set up, in "Photos" for this group -
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/photos/album/0/list
      > >
      > > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 12th of a series of reposts about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our group. Your comments are most welcome.
      > >
      > > Axel
      > >
      >
    • Patricia
      Hello Axel, The perfume could very well have played a big part in the identification of the royal couple, but I thought as well that Louis s actions were
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 4, 2009
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        Hello Axel,

        The perfume could very well have played a big part in the identification of the royal couple, but I thought as well that Louis's actions were instrumental in their capture and that he gave himself away.

        You would have thought that Antoinette would have had the good sense to not use any sort of scent, which would have given her away. After all, how many of the working class citizens could have afforded such a luxurious scent as the queen wore? Very few for sure! It would be most interesting to know the real actions of all involved. Antoinette
        enjoyed acting, but in her time of stress, would she have been careful
        in her actions? One does wonder.

        kind regards,
        Patricia

        --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "axel" <Rand103242@...> wrote:
        >
        > "Ms Feydeay said smelling the Queen's Wake is "as if you're walking past a magnificent bouquet comprising flowers of every season. It has an incredible fullness."
        >
        > "Marie Antoinette's love of perfumes is believed to be her undoing. Many accounts have been written of the events of 20 June, 1791, when Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and their family retinue attempted to escape to eastern France, where troops loyal to the monarchy were waiting.
        >
        > "Their flight was cut off at Varennes where they were recognised and arrested.
        >
        > "One version has it that a vigilant chamber-maid, observing the queen's travelling chest packed with several months' supplies of powders, pommades and perfumes, realised that the royal family were making a break for it.
        >
        > "Ms Feydeau believes the truth may have been much simpler, however. Late-18th century France was a pungent place, a world of open drains, cesspits and sewers and where taking a bath was a rare indulgence.
        >
        > " "The queen's fragrance must have made a strong contrast. I think it may well have been her scent that gave her away, either to other travellers or to people at the inn where they stopped," Ms Feydeau said.
        >
        > "Her toilette played as eloquent a part in her fall as it had in her prime. Part of the mythology surrounding the royal family's flight from Paris and capture at Varennes in June 1791 is that it was by Marie Antoinette's perfume that they were recognised; a legend that again makes the queen culpable for her femininity and glamour.
        >
        > "The royal couple were taken back to Paris under escort and publicly executed two years later.
        >
        > Quoted from article "Perfume that sent Marie Antoinette to guillotine weaves its spell again"
        > http://news.scotsman.com/topstories/Perfume-that-sent-Marie-Antoinette.2835707.jp
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Patricia" <MadameAntoine@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Thanks for posting this, Axel. I was wondering at what the ingredients were for her scent. As someone who has taken classes in aromatherapy using the essential oils in a healing manner, I would love to try and re-create this scent that was created for her.
        > >
        > > High quality essential oils can be very expensive, especially the sandalwood and damask rose. I would think that damask rose would also be including in any perfume for Marie Antoinette since she loved roses so much...I would certainly add a hint of rose to the scent.
        > >
        > > kind regards,
        > > Patricia
        > >
        > > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "axel" <Rand103242@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > This is a book review of Marie Antoinette's perfumer and the scents the Queen enjoyed and brought to her life at Versailles palace and beyond.
        > > >
        > > > "Jean-Louis Fargeon was the perfumer to Marie Antoinette. Born in 1748, seven years before the birth of the future Queen of France, Jean-Louis was the first-born son in a long line of apothecaries and perfumers. This book follows the trajectory of Jean-Louis' life as he masters the skills of a perfumer, develops his business and serves as perfumer to Marie Antoinette. The history of the French revolution is interwoven into the tale.
        > > >
        > > > "Title: A Scented Palace, The Secret History of Marie Antoinette's Perfumer
        > > > Author: Elisabeth de Feydeau
        > > > Translator: Jane Lizop
        > > > Publisher: I.B. Tauris, London, New York (2006)
        > > > Category: Non-fiction, history, biography
        > > > Price: US$22 hardcover (www.amazon.com)
        > > > Number of Pages: 114 before appendices, 140 including appendices
        > > >
        > > > "My favourite passage:
        > > > "Finally the perfumer had to reinforce the depth and perfect the harmony of his preparation. Vanilla would lend a warm and delicious touch, soft and velvety, redolent of Marie Antoinette's childhood and her fondness for Viennese pastries, a gourmet hint of sweetness and gentleness. Cedar and sandalwood would add the note of the wooded lanes of the Trianon. Amber and musk would overlay the entire composition with a sensual, animal fervour, and a pinch of benzoin would add warmth and tenacity to the whole." (page 70)
        > > >
        > > > "Why I chose this book:
        > > > A good friend/blogging fan noticed that I was researching and writing about Marie Antoinette in the fall and gave me this book for my birthday.
        > > >
        > > > "Rating: B
        > > > While this book was well-written, I found the volume slim with 114 pages. The footnotes are not extensive and the source of material that this biography is based on is not really clear (other than a mention of Fargeon's papers).
        > > >
        > > > "The book was amusing but did not really provide much new information about the time period, with the exception of the passages about the toilette preparations of Marie Antoinette. Nevertheless, I think that it is good read for die-hard Marie Antoinette fans. I simply cannot get enough of this fashion icon.
        > > > Posted By Ingrid Mida At 8:40 Pm
        > > > Sunday, January 25, 2009
        > > >
        > > > *************************
        > > >
        > > > The quoted post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in context at Ingrid's
        > > > Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" – Html or link: http://fashionismymuse.blogspot.com/
        > > > Please also see the artwork for this post – photo "Ingrid 12 – MA: Scented Palace" in the "Ingrid Mida – Antoinette" photo album folder I've set up, in "Photos" for this group -
        > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/photos/album/0/list
        > > >
        > > > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 12th of a series of reposts about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our group. Your comments are most welcome.
        > > >
        > > > Axel
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • janet fauble
        Hello Axel, This post made me remember when you asked me to check on scents...I must admit that I did not notice any unusal fragrance or odor when at the
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 5, 2009
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          Hello Axel,
           
          This post made me remember when you asked me to check on scents...I must admit that I did not notice any unusal fragrance or odor when at the chateau or in the gardens.  I did notice that the gardeners were at work in Antoinette's gardens, and I did also notice the strawberries that were forming in the strawberry patches.
           
          I suspect that any flaw of character became magnified if it were connected to the queen.  Even a scent of perfume becomes suspicious and cause for blame.   I rather imagine that a lot of this is exaggeration.  Frankly, I do not believe  a word of it.  It sounds like petty gossip to me.  I do not believe for one minute that she would wear a disguise and not be aware also to keep herself as close to the person she was imitating, meaning no perfume.
           
          No, I do not believe this story at all...she was not stupid by any means...Jan


          From: axel <Rand103242@...>
          To: Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, December 4, 2009 5:29:20 PM
          Subject: Did Antoinette’s perfumed scent cause her capture at Varennes

           

          "Ms Feydeay said smelling the Queen's Wake is "as if you're walking past a magnificent bouquet comprising flowers of every season. It has an incredible fullness."

          "Marie Antoinette's love of perfumes is believed to be her undoing. Many accounts have been written of the events of 20 June, 1791, when Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and their family retinue attempted to escape to eastern France, where troops loyal to the monarchy were waiting.

          "Their flight was cut off at Varennes where they were recognised and arrested.

          "One version has it that a vigilant chamber-maid, observing the queen's travelling chest packed with several months' supplies of powders, pommades and perfumes, realised that the royal family were making a break for it.

          "Ms Feydeau believes the truth may have been much simpler, however. Late-18th century France was a pungent place, a world of open drains, cesspits and sewers and where taking a bath was a rare indulgence.

          " "The queen's fragrance must have made a strong contrast. I think it may well have been her scent that gave her away, either to other travellers or to people at the inn where they stopped," Ms Feydeau said.

          "Her toilette played as eloquent a part in her fall as it had in her prime. Part of the mythology surrounding the royal family's flight from Paris and capture at Varennes in June 1791 is that it was by Marie Antoinette's perfume that they were recognised; a legend that again makes the queen culpable for her femininity and glamour.

          "The royal couple were taken back to Paris under escort and publicly executed two years later.

          Quoted from article "Perfume that sent Marie Antoinette to guillotine weaves its spell again"
          http://news. scotsman. com/topstories/ Perfume-that- sent-Marie- Antoinette. 2835707.jp

          --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "Patricia" <MadameAntoine@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for posting this, Axel. I was wondering at what the ingredients were for her scent. As someone who has taken classes in aromatherapy using the essential oils in a healing manner, I would love to try and re-create this scent that was created for her.
          >
          > High quality essential oils can be very expensive, especially the sandalwood and damask rose. I would think that damask rose would also be including in any perfume for Marie Antoinette since she loved roses so much...I would certainly add a hint of rose to the scent.
          >
          > kind regards,
          > Patricia
          >
          > --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "axel" <Rand103242@ > wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > This is a book review of Marie Antoinette's perfumer and the scents the Queen enjoyed and brought to her life at Versailles palace and beyond.
          > >
          > > "Jean-Louis Fargeon was the perfumer to Marie Antoinette. Born in 1748, seven years before the birth of the future Queen of France, Jean-Louis was the first-born son in a long line of apothecaries and perfumers. This book follows the trajectory of Jean-Louis' life as he masters the skills of a perfumer, develops his business and serves as perfumer to Marie Antoinette. The history of the French revolution is interwoven into the tale.
          > >
          > > "Title: A Scented Palace, The Secret History of Marie Antoinette's Perfumer
          > > Author: Elisabeth de Feydeau
          > > Translator: Jane Lizop
          > > Publisher: I.B. Tauris, London, New York (2006)
          > > Category: Non-fiction, history, biography
          > > Price: US$22 hardcover (www.amazon. com)
          > > Number of Pages: 114 before appendices, 140 including appendices
          > >
          > > "My favourite passage:
          > > "Finally the perfumer had to reinforce the depth and perfect the harmony of his preparation. Vanilla would lend a warm and delicious touch, soft and velvety, redolent of Marie Antoinette's childhood and her fondness for Viennese pastries, a gourmet hint of sweetness and gentleness. Cedar and sandalwood would add the note of the wooded lanes of the Trianon. Amber and musk would overlay the entire composition with a sensual, animal fervour, and a pinch of benzoin would add warmth and tenacity to the whole." (page 70)
          > >
          > > "Why I chose this book:
          > > A good friend/blogging fan noticed that I was researching and writing about Marie Antoinette in the fall and gave me this book for my birthday.
          > >
          > > "Rating: B
          > > While this book was well-written, I found the volume slim with 114 pages. The footnotes are not extensive and the source of material that this biography is based on is not really clear (other than a mention of Fargeon's papers).
          > >
          > > "The book was amusing but did not really provide much new information about the time period, with the exception of the passages about the toilette preparations of Marie Antoinette. Nevertheless, I think that it is good read for die-hard Marie Antoinette fans. I simply cannot get enough of this fashion icon.
          > > Posted By Ingrid Mida At 8:40 Pm
          > > Sunday, January 25, 2009
          > >
          > > ************ ********* ****
          > >
          > > The quoted post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in context at Ingrid's
          > > Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" – Html or link: http://fashionismym use.blogspot. com/
          > > Please also see the artwork for this post – photo "Ingrid 12 – MA: Scented Palace" in the "Ingrid Mida – Antoinette" photo album folder I've set up, in "Photos" for this group -
          > > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ photos/album/ 0/list
          > >
          > > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 12th of a series of reposts about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our group. Your comments are most welcome.
          > >
          > > Axel
          > >
          >


        • axel
          One would think Marie Antoinette would stay in disguise on this night when she and the royal family were fleeing for their lives. But, yet they fled in a huge
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 29, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            One would think Marie Antoinette would stay in disguise on this night when she and the royal family were fleeing for their lives. But, yet they fled in a huge ostentatious coach, Louis allowed himself to be seen when they were out of Paris and they dismissed Fersen, the one experienced military man as well. The Queen bought all new clothes and full stocked up on perfume, and you do wonder if she wore any of that perfume on the fateful night.

            Axel

            --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet fauble <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello Axel,
            >
            > This post made me remember when you asked me to check on scents...I must admit that I did not notice any unusal fragrance or odor when at the chateau or in the gardens.  I did notice that the gardeners were at work in Antoinette's gardens, and I did also notice the strawberries that were forming in the strawberry patches.
            >
            > I suspect that any flaw of character became magnified if it were connected to the queen.  Even a scent of perfume becomes suspicious and cause for blame.   I rather imagine that a lot of this is exaggeration.  Frankly, I do not believe  a word of it.  It sounds like petty gossip to me.  I do not believe for one minute that she would wear a disguise and not be aware also to keep herself as close to the person she was imitating, meaning no perfume.
            >
            > No, I do not believe this story at all...she was not stupid by any means...Jan
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: axel <Rand103242@...>
            > To: Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Fri, December 4, 2009 5:29:20 PM
            > Subject: Did Antoinette’s perfumed scent cause her capture at Varennes
            >
            >  
            > "Ms Feydeay said smelling the Queen's Wake is "as if you're walking past a magnificent bouquet comprising flowers of every season. It has an incredible fullness."
            >
            > "Marie Antoinette's love of perfumes is believed to be her undoing. Many accounts have been written of the events of 20 June, 1791, when Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and their family retinue attempted to escape to eastern France, where troops loyal to the monarchy were waiting.
            >
            > "Their flight was cut off at Varennes where they were recognised and arrested.
            >
            > "One version has it that a vigilant chamber-maid, observing the queen's travelling chest packed with several months' supplies of powders, pommades and perfumes, realised that the royal family were making a break for it.
            >
            > "Ms Feydeau believes the truth may have been much simpler, however. Late-18th century France was a pungent place, a world of open drains, cesspits and sewers and where taking a bath was a rare indulgence.
            >
            > " "The queen's fragrance must have made a strong contrast. I think it may well have been her scent that gave her away, either to other travellers or to people at the inn where they stopped," Ms Feydeau said.
            >
            > "Her toilette played as eloquent a part in her fall as it had in her prime. Part of the mythology surrounding the royal family's flight from Paris and capture at Varennes in June 1791 is that it was by Marie Antoinette's perfume that they were recognised; a legend that again makes the queen culpable for her femininity and glamour.
            >
            > "The royal couple were taken back to Paris under escort and publicly executed two years later.
            >
            > Quoted from article "Perfume that sent Marie Antoinette to guillotine weaves its spell again"
            > http://news. scotsman. com/topstories/ Perfume-that- sent-Marie- Antoinette. 2835707.jp
            >
            > --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "Patricia" <MadameAntoine@ ...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Thanks for posting this, Axel. I was wondering at what the ingredients were for her scent. As someone who has taken classes in aromatherapy using the essential oils in a healing manner, I would love to try and re-create this scent that was created for her.
            > >
            > > High quality essential oils can be very expensive, especially the sandalwood and damask rose. I would think that damask rose would also be including in any perfume for Marie Antoinette since she loved roses so much...I would certainly add a hint of rose to the scent.
            > >
            > > kind regards,
            > > Patricia
            > >
            > > --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "axel" <Rand103242@ > wrote:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > This is a book review of Marie Antoinette's perfumer and the scents the Queen enjoyed and brought to her life at Versailles palace and beyond.
            > > >
            > > > "Jean-Louis Fargeon was the perfumer to Marie Antoinette. Born in 1748, seven years before the birth of the future Queen of France, Jean-Louis was the first-born son in a long line of apothecaries and perfumers. This book follows the trajectory of Jean-Louis' life as he masters the skills of a perfumer, develops his business and serves as perfumer to Marie Antoinette. The history of the French revolution is interwoven into the tale.
            > > >
            > > > "Title: A Scented Palace, The Secret History of Marie Antoinette's Perfumer
            > > > Author: Elisabeth de Feydeau
            > > > Translator: Jane Lizop
            > > > Publisher: I.B. Tauris, London, New York (2006)
            > > > Category: Non-fiction, history, biography
            > > > Price: US$22 hardcover (www.amazon. com)
            > > > Number of Pages: 114 before appendices, 140 including appendices
            > > >
            > > > "My favourite passage:
            > > > "Finally the perfumer had to reinforce the depth and perfect the harmony of his preparation. Vanilla would lend a warm and delicious touch, soft and velvety, redolent of Marie Antoinette's childhood and her fondness for Viennese pastries, a gourmet hint of sweetness and gentleness. Cedar and sandalwood would add the note of the wooded lanes of the Trianon. Amber and musk would overlay the entire composition with a sensual, animal fervour, and a pinch of benzoin would add warmth and tenacity to the whole." (page 70)
            > > >
            > > > "Why I chose this book:
            > > > A good friend/blogging fan noticed that I was researching and writing about Marie Antoinette in the fall and gave me this book for my birthday.
            > > >
            > > > "Rating: B
            > > > While this book was well-written, I found the volume slim with 114 pages. The footnotes are not extensive and the source of material that this biography is based on is not really clear (other than a mention of Fargeon's papers).
            > > >
            > > > "The book was amusing but did not really provide much new information about the time period, with the exception of the passages about the toilette preparations of Marie Antoinette. Nevertheless, I think that it is good read for die-hard Marie Antoinette fans. I simply cannot get enough of this fashion icon.
            > > > Posted By Ingrid Mida At 8:40 Pm
            > > > Sunday, January 25, 2009
            > > >
            > > > ************ ********* ****
            > > >
            > > > The quoted post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in context at Ingrid's
            > > > Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" â€" Html or link: http://fashionismym use.blogspot. com/
            > > > Please also see the artwork for this post â€" photo "Ingrid 12 â€" MA: Scented Palace" in the "Ingrid Mida â€" Antoinette" photo album folder I've set up, in "Photos" for this group -
            > > > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ photos/album/ 0/list
            > > >
            > > > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 12th of a series of reposts about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our group. Your comments are most welcome.
            > > >
            > > > Axel
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • janet fauble
            HI Axel, Frustration after frustration, isn t it?  Axel Fersen was the one who selected the ostentatious coach, but he was under duress too, and how easy was
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 29, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              HI Axel,
               
              Frustration after frustration, isn't it?  Axel Fersen was the one who selected the ostentatious coach, but he was under duress too, and how easy was it to find a coach then that one could use for a large family anyway, and then it was the King who did not want Fersen to continue with them, (according to some who think that he was jealous of Fersen since Fersen had wanted to accompany them), and if Antoinette did choose to wear perfume, then she is clearly to blame.  It is odd to think that when one runs to safety to save one's life that one must carry perfume with her, isn't it?
               
              But the topper is that the King had to have his giant appetite satisfied, so he had a full dinner to eat while on his getaway trip.
               
              And of course, they had to have a breakdown of the carriage along the way...what can you say, but pure frustration.
               
              However, I believe that Nostradamus foresaw all of this according to a quatrain that is always interpreted as the night of the escape to Varennes.  That is the only consolation in this horror of horrors.
               
              But to think that both fatal flaws are exposed so obviously in this situation: her vanity with her perfume, and his gluttony with his appetite...it surely is a recipe for disaster.
               
              Jan
               
               
               
               <Rand103242@...>
              To: Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tue, December 29, 2009 3:10:22 PM
              Subject: Re: Did Antoinette's perfumed scent cause her capture at Varennes

               

              One would think Marie Antoinette would stay in disguise on this night when she and the royal family were fleeing for their lives. But, yet they fled in a huge ostentatious coach, Louis allowed himself to be seen when they were out of Paris and they dismissed Fersen, the one experienced military man as well. The Queen bought all new clothes and full stocked up on perfume, and you do wonder if she wore any of that perfume on the fateful night.

              Axel

              --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, janet fauble <janetcfauble@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello Axel,
              >
              > This post made me remember when you asked me to check on scents...I must admit that I did not notice any unusal fragrance or odor when at the chateau or in the gardens.  I did notice that the gardeners were at work in Antoinette's gardens, and I did also notice the strawberries that were forming in the strawberry patches.
              >
              > I suspect that any flaw of character became magnified if it were connected to the queen.  Even a scent of perfume becomes suspicious and cause for blame.   I rather imagine that a lot of this is exaggeration.  Frankly, I do not believe  a word of it.  It sounds like petty gossip to me.  I do not believe for one minute that she would wear a disguise and not be aware also to keep herself as close to the person she was imitating, meaning no perfume.
              >
              > No, I do not believe this story at all...she was not stupid by any means...Jan
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ____________ _________ _________ __
              > From: axel <Rand103242@ ...>
              > To: Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com
              > Sent: Fri, December 4, 2009 5:29:20 PM
              > Subject: Did Antoinette’s perfumed scent cause her capture at Varennes
              >
              >  
              > "Ms Feydeay said smelling the Queen's Wake is "as if you're walking past a magnificent bouquet comprising flowers of every season. It has an incredible fullness."
              >
              > "Marie Antoinette's love of perfumes is believed to be her undoing. Many accounts have been written of the events of 20 June, 1791, when Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and their family retinue attempted to escape to eastern France, where troops loyal to the monarchy were waiting.
              >
              > "Their flight was cut off at Varennes where they were recognised and arrested.
              >
              > "One version has it that a vigilant chamber-maid, observing the queen's travelling chest packed with several months' supplies of powders, pommades and perfumes, realised that the royal family were making a break for it.
              >
              > "Ms Feydeau believes the truth may have been much simpler, however. Late-18th century France was a pungent place, a world of open drains, cesspits and sewers and where taking a bath was a rare indulgence.
              >
              > " "The queen's fragrance must have made a strong contrast. I think it may well have been her scent that gave her away, either to other travellers or to people at the inn where they stopped," Ms Feydeau said.
              >
              > "Her toilette played as eloquent a part in her fall as it had in her prime. Part of the mythology surrounding the royal family's flight from Paris and capture at Varennes in June 1791 is that it was by Marie Antoinette's perfume that they were recognised; a legend that again makes the queen culpable for her femininity and glamour.
              >
              > "The royal couple were taken back to Paris under escort and publicly executed two years later.
              >
              > Quoted from article "Perfume that sent Marie Antoinette to guillotine weaves its spell again"
              > http://news. scotsman. com/topstories/ Perfume-that- sent-Marie- Antoinette. 2835707.jp
              >
              > --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "Patricia" <MadameAntoine@ ...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Thanks for posting this, Axel. I was wondering at what the ingredients were for her scent. As someone who has taken classes in aromatherapy using the essential oils in a healing manner, I would love to try and re-create this scent that was created for her.
              > >
              > > High quality essential oils can be very expensive, especially the sandalwood and damask rose. I would think that damask rose would also be including in any perfume for Marie Antoinette since she loved roses so much...I would certainly add a hint of rose to the scent.
              > >
              > > kind regards,
              > > Patricia
              > >
              > > --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "axel" <Rand103242@ > wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > This is a book review of Marie Antoinette's perfumer and the scents the Queen enjoyed and brought to her life at Versailles palace and beyond.
              > > >
              > > > "Jean-Louis Fargeon was the perfumer to Marie Antoinette. Born in 1748, seven years before the birth of the future Queen of France, Jean-Louis was the first-born son in a long line of apothecaries and perfumers. This book follows the trajectory of Jean-Louis' life as he masters the skills of a perfumer, develops his business and serves as perfumer to Marie Antoinette. The history of the French revolution is interwoven into the tale.
              > > >
              > > > "Title: A Scented Palace, The Secret History of Marie Antoinette's Perfumer
              > > > Author: Elisabeth de Feydeau
              > > > Translator: Jane Lizop
              > > > Publisher: I.B. Tauris, London, New York (2006)
              > > > Category: Non-fiction, history, biography
              > > > Price: US$22 hardcover (www.amazon. com)
              > > > Number of Pages: 114 before appendices, 140 including appendices
              > > >
              > > > "My favourite passage:
              > > > "Finally the perfumer had to reinforce the depth and perfect the harmony of his preparation. Vanilla would lend a warm and delicious touch, soft and velvety, redolent of Marie Antoinette's childhood and her fondness for Viennese pastries, a gourmet hint of sweetness and gentleness. Cedar and sandalwood would add the note of the wooded lanes of the Trianon. Amber and musk would overlay the entire composition with a sensual, animal fervour, and a pinch of benzoin would add warmth and tenacity to the whole." (page 70)
              > > >
              > > > "Why I chose this book:
              > > > A good friend/blogging fan noticed that I was researching and writing about Marie Antoinette in the fall and gave me this book for my birthday.
              > > >
              > > > "Rating: B
              > > > While this book was well-written, I found the volume slim with 114 pages. The footnotes are not extensive and the source of material that this biography is based on is not really clear (other than a mention of Fargeon's papers).
              > > >
              > > > "The book was amusing but did not really provide much new information about the time period, with the exception of the passages about the toilette preparations of Marie Antoinette. Nevertheless, I think that it is good read for die-hard Marie Antoinette fans. I simply cannot get enough of this fashion icon.
              > > > Posted By Ingrid Mida At 8:40 Pm
              > > > Sunday, January 25, 2009
              > > >
              > > > ************ ********* ****
              > > >
              > > > The quoted post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in context at Ingrid's
              > > > Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" â€" Html or link: http://fashionismym use.blogspot. com/
              > > > Please also see the artwork for this post â€" photo "Ingrid 12 â€" MA: Scented Palace" in the "Ingrid Mida â€" Antoinette" photo album folder I've set up, in "Photos" for this group -
              > > > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ photos/album/ 0/list
              > > >
              > > > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 12th of a series of reposts about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our group. Your comments are most welcome.
              > > >
              > > > Axel
              > > >
              > >
              >


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