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'Marie Antoinette en Gaulle': Rejection and Vigee's response

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  • janet fauble
    Axel,   You made me think...How did the Queen and Mme.Vigee le Brun respond to the reaction of the public when they learned of its rejection?  It must have
    Message 1 of 1 , May 31 10:15 PM
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      Axel,
       
      You made me think...How did the Queen and Mme.Vigee le Brun respond to the reaction of the public when they learned of its rejection?  It must have been very hurtful.   Jan

      --- On Sat, 5/30/09, Axel <Rand103242@...> wrote:

      From: Axel <Rand103242@...>
      Subject: Re: 'Marie Antoinette en Gaulle': Queen so lovely
      To: Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, May 30, 2009, 1:32 PM

      I agree the portrait "Marie Antoinette en Gaulle" shows Marie Antoinette as a remarkably beautiful woman.

      Marie Antoinette no doubt loved the pose showing her in her casual muslin shepherdess dress as she generally appeared at her beloved Petit Trianon.

      And it is no doubt how the painter Elisabeth Vigee LeBrun best liked to dress and pose the Queen. I believe Mme Vigee LeBrun even said she thought the Queen looked a thousand times better posed in her Trianon attire than in her formal court dresses.

      So the painter convinced the Queen to pose this way, and that beauty of Marie Antoinette shown in that painting comes down to us today.

      Axel

      --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, janet fauble <janetcfauble@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > Thank you, Axel, for refreshing my memory about this portrait, and telling us the terrible tragedy accompanying it. I love the dress, the freshness and sweetness of the face of the Queen, and find it utterly deplorable that critics objected to it.   It is probably an insight into the truth of the nature of the Queen at that time, and she looks lovely.  What a drama!  Jan
      >
      > --- On Fri, 5/22/09, Axel <Rand103242@ ...> wrote:
      >
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      > From: Axel <Rand103242@ ...>
      > Subject: Marie Antoinette and her Portraitist, Elisabeth Vigee Le Brun
      > To: Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com
      > Date: Friday, May 22, 2009, 1:55 PM
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      > This portrait of Marie Antoinette, entitled La Reine en Gaulle (The Queen dressed in a Gaulle), caused a scandal when it was shown at the Paris artist's salon of 1783. (See this portrait in Ingid photo album, under Ingrid 7.) The traditional accoutrements of royal portraiture - the grand habit de cour, the royal jewels, and the heavily powdered hairstyle - were absent. Marie Antoinette was portrayed in a white muslin dress and the reaction to this break in tradition and convention was vociferous.
      >
      > Critics and the public thought that Marie Antoinette was "wearing a chamber-maid' s dust cloth". Generally it was thought that the Queen violated "the fundamental law of this kingdom, that the public cannot suffer to see its princes lower themselves to the level of mere mortals (Mademoiselle de Mirecourt)."
      >
      > The painting was withdrawn from the salon and replaced with another, hastily executed painting called La Reine a la Rose. The substituted painting showed the Queen in more a traditional blue-gray silk robe a la francaise and pearl jewels. Unfortunately the damage had already been done by the first portrait of the queen "dressed up like a serving girl" and fueled further speculation about the Queen's respect for the throne and her loyalty to France.
      >
      > Elisabeth Louise Vigee Le Brun, the Queen's portraitist, preferred to dress her sitters in more natural styles of dress. In her published memoirs, she recounts how she gained the trust of her models in order to allow her "to dress them after my fancy" aiming for the beautiful drapery of Raphael and Domenichino. She also wrote that she "detested the powdering of hair" and how she convinced the Duchesse de Gramont-Caderouusse not to put powder in her beautiful black hair when she sat for her portrait.
      >
      > Le Brun painted many self-portraits and her affinity for simple gowns and unpowdered hair is evident in how she portrays herself. This self-portrait completed in 1781 (two years prior to the salon fiasco), Le Brun wears a white muslin gown, adorned only with a coral-coloured bow, and styles her hair simply without powder.
      >
      > Le Brun's influence on French fashion was substantial. Le Brun was considered to be "one of the major painters at the epicentre of art and fashion" of the time and that "perhaps more than any single individual in the last quarter of the eighteenth century, Vigee Le Brun influenced the development of women's costume" with her preference for "a more natural look". (Memoires secrets pour servir a l'histroire de la republique 1777-89, vol. 16, pg. 226).
      > Posted by Ingrid Mida at 1:05 PM
      > Thursday, October 23, 2008
      >
      > ************ ********* ****
      >
      > The post above was written by Ingrid Mida and can be viewed in context at Ingrid's
      > Blog / Website "Fashion is My Muse" â€" Html or link: http://fashionismym use.blogspot. com/
      > Please also see the artwork for this post â€" photo "Ingrid 7 â€" MA portraitist Vigee LeBrun"in the "Ingrid Mida â€" Antoinette" photo album folder I've set up, in "Photos" for this group -
      > http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ photos/album/ 0/list
      >
      > This piece is re-posted here at Images of Marie Antoinette with the kind permission of Ingrid Mida and is the 7th of a series of reposts about Marie Antoinette and her fashions for the enjoyment of our group. Your comments are most welcome.
      >
      > Axel
      >


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