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Re: Revival of MA name, reputation would please Queen

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  • madame_antoine
    Hi Jan, I waited to let someone else answer in defense of Marie Antoinette but no one in the group came forward to defend her. I ve defended her numerous times
    Message 1 of 51 , Jun 1, 2008
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      Hi Jan,

      I waited to let someone else answer in defense of Marie Antoinette
      but no one in the group came forward to defend her. I've defended
      her numerous times lately and so didn't want to be the one to come
      forward now.

      To say that it was Marie Antoinette who was most responsible
      for the problems of the French monarchy is quite a bit of an
      exaggeration. Nor, was she responsible for the French Revolution. The
      road to revolution had been building for years...just as any
      revolution does. It is never one person's life that causes a
      revolution, even though there have been singularly evil minded
      dictators who have caused catastrophic loss of life,ie:
      Hitler/Germany, Stalin/Soviet Union,Chairman Mao/Communist China,
      Pol Pot/Cambodia and Hussein/Iraq. The natural desire for freedom
      builds in the hearts and souls of most human beings and no matter
      how hard a monarchy could have tried, it would have been impossible
      to keep EVERYONE happy and there would always be some discontent.

      Marie Antoinette made some mistakes and she was "set up" for
      failure by those around her. Make no mistake...it was not coincidence
      that caused some of her problems but there were those who set out
      from the beginning to foment hatred of the french people for her
      and to find ways to bring her down. It is a fact of life that ALL
      of us make mistakes. How would we ever learn anything if we didn't??
      Most of Marie Antoinette's mistakes were made when she was younger
      and yes, she was a high-strung and somewhat willful young woman
      and had she listened to her own inner instincts and not listened
      to some of those around her, she would probably have fared much
      better. The aunts stirred contention between Antoinette and Du Barry,
      I believe. Someone can correct me if I am wrong about that. There
      were also other family members that are believed to have "set her up"
      for the necklace affair and other problems she had with the pamplets.
      As others have remarked in Antoinette's defense before, her clothing
      was not more extravagant than other Queens of the past. She even
      spent less than some of the others.

      The french people were "ripe" for revolution and there were those
      who were setting the stage for this very thing. I'm sure that you
      realize the American people are "set up" all the time by the news
      media. Many, many times our attention is purposely "focused" on
      things that are not that important...to take our minds off of
      something that our leaders are trying to "sneak past us" and vote
      quietly in to law. I'm not being negative on this...just realistic
      because it is something I've observed.

      No, Marie Antoinette, for all the foibles in her young life...was not
      responsible for the problems of the french monarchy or the
      revolution. She and Louis were simply the scapegoats for a
      country that over a period of many years had ripened for
      revolution. In spite of some of the mistakes she might have made
      she was a good woman, a likeable woman and queen who was sacrificed
      upon the altar of revolution, just as her husband Louis was. She was
      a good mother and had a good heart and both she and Louis accepted
      their fate and went to their deaths with dignity and bravery.

      kindest regards,
      Patricia

      --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet fauble
      <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello Jay, Bonjour,
      > Well, I must say that you have displayed a great empathy for
      Queen Antoinette! I wonder how she would have felt about our first
      lady Jacqueline Kennedy sleeping in her bed. Would she have been
      pleased or displeased?
      >
      > My own personal belief is that had she not been beheaded so
      dreadfully she would not have had near the interest or attraction
      from the public as she does have now. For some reason, tragedy
      attracts.
      >
      > To me, Cleopatra and Queen Elizabeth I are so much more
      interesting and exciting that I always marvel at the interest in
      Antoinette. In women of the world who inspire she ranks very low.
      In Victoria Holt's book I gained the impression that she was mostly a
      difficult adolescent who was way over her head in the court of
      France. She clearly was drowning most of the time.
      >
      > For those of you who are in love with her I know it is difficult
      to understand those of who are not and who actually do blame her for
      the loss of the crown of France. I do believe that it is she who is
      most responsible for the failure of the regime to adequately protect
      itself. She placed the King in an awkward position with all her
      excessive extravagance, her girlish ways, her hairstyles, her high
      fashion sense, and all the while, she knew full well the plight of
      the public but went ahead and did it anyway. For example, buying new
      furniture when forced to live in Paris. Even Axel Fersen wondered at
      her extreme stupidity to think only of herself at a time when the mob
      and the populus were clearly trying to kill her.
      >
      > Antoinette acted foolishly many times. She can be truly held
      responsible for accelerating and fomenting the hatred of the people
      towards her. She did nothing to help herself, the King, or the Crown
      at all. All this sympathy towards her is truly wrong in my opinion.
      She will be held responsible for her part in it. I honestly believe
      that Jefferson got it right.
      >
      > Jan
      >
      > Jay Bernson <ejbernson@...> wrote:
      >
      > If Marie Antoinette spoke with us today, I feel
      > that she would be dismayed at the "media circus"
      > of Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, and Anna Nicole
      > Smith. I think that Marie Antoinette learned the
      > hard way the value of "good press."
      >
      > Marie Antoinette would prefer the 1938 version of
      > her life starring the underrated Norma Shearer and
      > made at the apogee of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
      >
      > Marie Antoinette would admire and appreciate the
      > true classic designers such as Worth, Chanel, and
      > Jean-Louis. Her musical taste would be Frank Sinatra,
      > Peggy Lee, and Ella Fitzgerald.
      >
      > Marie Antoinette would be quite flattered that the
      > Empress Eugenie made her court like Marie Antoinette's
      > court and that the Empress Alexandra Romanov had her
      > portrait in her mauve bedroom suite.
      >
      > Marie Antoinette would smile her illusive smile at the
      > fact that she was very much in vogue and that so many
      > people flock to the Petit Trianon and The Hameau.
      >
      > Marie Antoinette would be pleased that her so often
      > tarnished reputation has been corrected. People forget
      > that Marie Antoinette "broke the glass ceiling" and
      > was a fashion icon, trendsetter, excellent Mother, and
      > showed courage until her untimely end. I admire her
      > due to the long journey she made from a vapid young
      > Queen to the daughter of Maria Theresa trying to save
      > the monarchy. Her maturation was truly incredible. And
      > yes, Marie Antoinette wrote the letter to the Princess
      > Elizabeth. Her courage and being focused at the end are
      > the stuff of legends.
      >
      > Best to All,
      > Jay
      >
    • lori333eliza
      Totally excellent,perceptive and compassionate post.
      Message 51 of 51 , Sep 13, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Totally excellent,perceptive and compassionate post.


        --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "madame_antoine"
        <MadameAntoine@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Jan,
        >
        > I waited to let someone else answer in defense of Marie Antoinette
        > but no one in the group came forward to defend her. I've defended
        > her numerous times lately and so didn't want to be the one to come
        > forward now.
        >
        > To say that it was Marie Antoinette who was most responsible
        > for the problems of the French monarchy is quite a bit of an
        > exaggeration. Nor, was she responsible for the French Revolution. The
        > road to revolution had been building for years...just as any
        > revolution does. It is never one person's life that causes a
        > revolution, even though there have been singularly evil minded
        > dictators who have caused catastrophic loss of life,ie:
        > Hitler/Germany, Stalin/Soviet Union,Chairman Mao/Communist China,
        > Pol Pot/Cambodia and Hussein/Iraq. The natural desire for freedom
        > builds in the hearts and souls of most human beings and no matter
        > how hard a monarchy could have tried, it would have been impossible
        > to keep EVERYONE happy and there would always be some discontent.
        >
        > Marie Antoinette made some mistakes and she was "set up" for
        > failure by those around her. Make no mistake...it was not coincidence
        > that caused some of her problems but there were those who set out
        > from the beginning to foment hatred of the french people for her
        > and to find ways to bring her down. It is a fact of life that ALL
        > of us make mistakes. How would we ever learn anything if we didn't??
        > Most of Marie Antoinette's mistakes were made when she was younger
        > and yes, she was a high-strung and somewhat willful young woman
        > and had she listened to her own inner instincts and not listened
        > to some of those around her, she would probably have fared much
        > better. The aunts stirred contention between Antoinette and Du Barry,
        > I believe. Someone can correct me if I am wrong about that. There
        > were also other family members that are believed to have "set her up"
        > for the necklace affair and other problems she had with the pamplets.
        > As others have remarked in Antoinette's defense before, her clothing
        > was not more extravagant than other Queens of the past. She even
        > spent less than some of the others.
        >
        > The french people were "ripe" for revolution and there were those
        > who were setting the stage for this very thing. I'm sure that you
        > realize the American people are "set up" all the time by the news
        > media. Many, many times our attention is purposely "focused" on
        > things that are not that important...to take our minds off of
        > something that our leaders are trying to "sneak past us" and vote
        > quietly in to law. I'm not being negative on this...just realistic
        > because it is something I've observed.
        >
        > No, Marie Antoinette, for all the foibles in her young life...was not
        > responsible for the problems of the french monarchy or the
        > revolution. She and Louis were simply the scapegoats for a
        > country that over a period of many years had ripened for
        > revolution. In spite of some of the mistakes she might have made
        > she was a good woman, a likeable woman and queen who was sacrificed
        > upon the altar of revolution, just as her husband Louis was. She was
        > a good mother and had a good heart and both she and Louis accepted
        > their fate and went to their deaths with dignity and bravery.
        >
        > kindest regards,
        > Patricia
        >
        > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet fauble
        > <janetcfauble@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello Jay, Bonjour,
        > > Well, I must say that you have displayed a great empathy for
        > Queen Antoinette! I wonder how she would have felt about our first
        > lady Jacqueline Kennedy sleeping in her bed. Would she have been
        > pleased or displeased?
        > >
        > > My own personal belief is that had she not been beheaded so
        > dreadfully she would not have had near the interest or attraction
        > from the public as she does have now. For some reason, tragedy
        > attracts.
        > >
        > > To me, Cleopatra and Queen Elizabeth I are so much more
        > interesting and exciting that I always marvel at the interest in
        > Antoinette. In women of the world who inspire she ranks very low.
        > In Victoria Holt's book I gained the impression that she was mostly a
        > difficult adolescent who was way over her head in the court of
        > France. She clearly was drowning most of the time.
        > >
        > > For those of you who are in love with her I know it is difficult
        > to understand those of who are not and who actually do blame her for
        > the loss of the crown of France. I do believe that it is she who is
        > most responsible for the failure of the regime to adequately protect
        > itself. She placed the King in an awkward position with all her
        > excessive extravagance, her girlish ways, her hairstyles, her high
        > fashion sense, and all the while, she knew full well the plight of
        > the public but went ahead and did it anyway. For example, buying new
        > furniture when forced to live in Paris. Even Axel Fersen wondered at
        > her extreme stupidity to think only of herself at a time when the mob
        > and the populus were clearly trying to kill her.
        > >
        > > Antoinette acted foolishly many times. She can be truly held
        > responsible for accelerating and fomenting the hatred of the people
        > towards her. She did nothing to help herself, the King, or the Crown
        > at all. All this sympathy towards her is truly wrong in my opinion.
        > She will be held responsible for her part in it. I honestly believe
        > that Jefferson got it right.
        > >
        > > Jan
        > >
        > > Jay Bernson <ejbernson@> wrote:
        > >
        > > If Marie Antoinette spoke with us today, I feel
        > > that she would be dismayed at the "media circus"
        > > of Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, and Anna Nicole
        > > Smith. I think that Marie Antoinette learned the
        > > hard way the value of "good press."
        > >
        > > Marie Antoinette would prefer the 1938 version of
        > > her life starring the underrated Norma Shearer and
        > > made at the apogee of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
        > >
        > > Marie Antoinette would admire and appreciate the
        > > true classic designers such as Worth, Chanel, and
        > > Jean-Louis. Her musical taste would be Frank Sinatra,
        > > Peggy Lee, and Ella Fitzgerald.
        > >
        > > Marie Antoinette would be quite flattered that the
        > > Empress Eugenie made her court like Marie Antoinette's
        > > court and that the Empress Alexandra Romanov had her
        > > portrait in her mauve bedroom suite.
        > >
        > > Marie Antoinette would smile her illusive smile at the
        > > fact that she was very much in vogue and that so many
        > > people flock to the Petit Trianon and The Hameau.
        > >
        > > Marie Antoinette would be pleased that her so often
        > > tarnished reputation has been corrected. People forget
        > > that Marie Antoinette "broke the glass ceiling" and
        > > was a fashion icon, trendsetter, excellent Mother, and
        > > showed courage until her untimely end. I admire her
        > > due to the long journey she made from a vapid young
        > > Queen to the daughter of Maria Theresa trying to save
        > > the monarchy. Her maturation was truly incredible. And
        > > yes, Marie Antoinette wrote the letter to the Princess
        > > Elizabeth. Her courage and being focused at the end are
        > > the stuff of legends.
        > >
        > > Best to All,
        > > Jay
        > >
        >
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