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Re: The Queen and the grocer's wife I (revised post)

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  • janet fauble
    Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed it! You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan ladyofhealingtouch
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 17, 2007
      Wow!  This is just beautiful!  I am so impressed.  You nailed it!  You really reached me.  Just love this post.  Thanks so much...Jan

      ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@...> wrote:
      In re-reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
      Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
      I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such long
      hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is feeling
      discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their escape.
      She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one who
      did all the planning and he could have been there to assist Louis in
      the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced, well-
      trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even though
      Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed, she
      supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his wife
      must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.

      She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They brought
      far too much baggage, too many people and they should never have
      ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much attention
      where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
      discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for the
      others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when there
      was still the possibility of escape.

      As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
      questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the length of
      the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
      out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is completely
      unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she realized,
      she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to sound
      more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is, Sauce is
      now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
      disguise...for surely no governess would have such an aristocratic
      voice with such a commanding tone!

      Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it is
      now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up for
      the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be falling
      apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop and
      they are put to bed.
      As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil down
      and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The plans..Axel' s
      wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far away
      now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all falling
      apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A lone
      tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
      lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would have
      preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is grateful
      for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all dusty
      and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way one
      looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the thought of
      a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.

      At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and the
      insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness is
      taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I can
      take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
      longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones towards
      her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but she
      can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that begs
      command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The words
      are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!! What
      have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage that
      was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed suspicion.
      She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
      admitted who we are!!

      Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows Louis.
      As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends over
      and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
      Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not only
      recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!

      These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been going
      on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
      discouraging journey, that should have been a successful escape,
      but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
      blessings to all,
      LadyofHealingTouch
      (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "Axel"
      <Rand103242@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
      >
      > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large ostentatious
      > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an empty
      > stable.
      >
      > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not here,
      where
      > are the horses ?"
      > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
      > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
      >
      > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without changing
      > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty louis !
      > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only agree
      to
      > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
      center),
      > where relay horses may be found.
      >
      > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
      >
      > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace. Under
      > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and queen
      to
      > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new laws
      have
      > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their royal
      > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette,
      > their children and governess, the king's sister and two servants
      > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
      >
      > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste delights
      the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind denouncing
      all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
      confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading the
      escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
      affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has doen to
      make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the family took
      several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But now
      the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last turned
      to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris. By now
      and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to be met
      by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
      >
      > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim) is
      > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their expected
      escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems to
      take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with bagage
      and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
      >
      > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree to the
      > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a change of
      > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
      >
      > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
      near.
      >
      > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village center "Stop,
      > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms Brunier,
      the
      > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the small
      coach
      > that accompanies the berline)
      > - « Passports? »
      > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second coach. »
      >
      > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is Sauce,
      > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with his
      > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
      > - « Where are you going to? »
      > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
      >
      > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the wrong
      > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
      >
      > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
      > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
      >
      > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen is
      in
      > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and demeanor
      remain commanding and aristocratic.
      > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de Korff
      (in
      > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is silent.
      >
      > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
      speaks
      > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does she
      wears
      > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
      > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something more, he
      detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
      >
      > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
      >
      > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
      strength
      > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that they
      > are in order.
      >
      > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He is
      > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed. Sauce
      > wants no trouble.
      >
      > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
      stopped
      > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
      > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him all is
      in
      > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
      >
      > But Drouet is not put off.
      >
      > "Who gave you those papers?"
      > "Was it the woman servant?"
      > "What was she like?"
      >
      > Sauce shuffles and nods.
      > "Yes, the governess.
      > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
      >
      > Drouet smiles.
      > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
      > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
      > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
      > us all to hurry it up."
      > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
      > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was enough"
      > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see pictures of
      > her."
      > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once saw
      Marie
      > Antoinette."
      > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty blonde I
      saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
      > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me a
      gold
      > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
      > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
      coach,
      > and it's THE KING!"
      >
      > Sauce protests –
      > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two children,
      with
      > governess and servant.
      >
      > Drouet insists -
      > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the Queen
      > and their children."
      > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would be
      > guilty of crime. »
      > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
      >
      > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to wait
      > until tomorrow.
      >
      > It's half past Eleven PM,
      >
      > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the berline
      > protest. They try to force their way out of the village. National
      > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
      >
      > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend the
      night)
      > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
      >
      > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted to
      > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers (spectators,
      > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious onlookers)
      may
      > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
      >
      > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the Sauce
      > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise (the wears
      > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death (dog
      tired)
      > are put up in a bed.
      >
      > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like to
      open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
      >
      > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must she be
      thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
      > her?
      >
      > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a palace.
      Will
      > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room house –

      > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
      peasant
      > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it? How
      revolting!
      >
      > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
      welcome.
      > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
      disguised
      > King.
      >
      > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They are
      > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
      dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic and he
      finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
      >
      > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational. He
      > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
      insistance,
      > with such an arrogance.
      >
      > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but how
      > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before her,
      and
      > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
      > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
      unbearable.
      >
      > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help but be
      > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
      > interfering. She tells them all:
      >
      > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
      >
      > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of what the
      > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
      briefly
      > into the candle light both men again study her.
      >
      > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-featured
      woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady quite well
      born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men obey
      her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect the
      scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the pungent
      odors of the grocer's shop.
      >
      > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two servants
      arouse are still not enough.
      >
      > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce interjects. He
      has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
      Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the King a
      lot of times.
      >
      > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the cramped
      hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant, Destez
      not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over. He bows
      > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
      >
      > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
      >
      >
      >
      ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ********* ********* ***
      > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the chapter «
      > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere Marie-
      > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some editing
      > of Pimprenelle' s translation from the French and some further «
      > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
      installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I and
      II and then post part III together to give the whole short story of
      the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours which must
      have seemed a lifetime to them.
      >
      > In this revised version, I added some background for those less
      familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
      Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
      mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past read
      accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he had
      seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not enitrely
      alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the prefumer
      of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her famous
      fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume, and that
      she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These articles
      speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a links to
      an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
      Queen" -
      http://www.theglobe andmail.com/ servlet/ArticleN ews/TPStory/ LAC/2005052
      1/PERFUME21/ TPTravel/
      >
      > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are welcome.
      >



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    • Axel
      Her husband the king wanted to be a locksmith. Beautiful Marie Antoinette loved acting, playing commoners, but flopped the role of her life. In the flight to
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 1, 2007
        Her husband the king wanted to be a locksmith. Beautiful Marie
        Antoinette loved acting, playing commoners, but flopped the role of
        her life.

        In the flight to Varennes or as some call it the flight to Montmedy
        but stopped at Varennes, King Louis and Queen Marie Antoinette donned
        disguises and were to play assigned roles. Yet they were discovered
        and I would suggest this was in part the result of the Queen's
        failure as an actress.

        In the 1st of 8 segments of the narrative of Varennes - "The Queen
        and the grocer's wife" (3 segments) and "The Queen's White Hair" (5
        segments), Lady of Healinh Touch (Patricia) comments on this first
        segment on the long ride, the mistakes made, bitter dissapointment
        and the discovery of King and Queen at Varennes.

        I really like Patricia's discussion - almost putting herself in the
        Queen's royal shoes. As I read Patricia's fine post I could feel the
        intense summer heat, feel myself dirty with dust. I can imagine
        Queen Marie Antoinette as she sweats and perspires in her royal
        clothes - unable to change, cramped in the coach with the fussing
        tired children, without the governess at hand, and the day - the
        never ending day - it was June 20 the summer solstace - the sun did
        not set til past 9pm!

        I hope others will put themselves in the role as Patricia did and
        comment more if you can.
        Here is a link to the original the Patricia commented on
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060
        and her comments are below.

        I hope Patricia will do it again with the next installment - "The
        Queen and the grocer's wife - II"
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5065

        My comment on what Patricia said is how Marie Antoinette failed to
        play her part. She of all of them had at least some experience in
        play acting - Rosina in the Barber of Seville and other roles at the
        Trianon theatre.

        Yet, here is the role of her life - to save the life of herself and
        her family, she needs to play a servant - not the sprightly barmaid
        who catches men's attention, the love interest of the Beaumarchais
        play as she is used to ...but a different role a real servant,
        humble, subservient and unobtrusive - non-glamourous!!

        For the Queen, this proved a real acting challenge and it seems too
        much out of character. Patricia points out how she spoke up ...how
        she did so in aristocratic tones... but even more than that, true she
        did not open her necessaire but was she wearing sillage perfume?
        She had ordered special clothes for the journey - did that include
        her governess costume? No hand-me downs for the queen and perhaps a
        governess costume with a bit of pinache and fashion taste to flatter
        her figure? hmmmm ... I wonder...

        I suggest that failure of the Queen to play her assigned role (and to
        help Louis better play his role) as the roles should have been played
        were important contibutions to their capture at Varennes in June 1791.

        Hope others too will comment on Patricia's fine piece or on the
        original
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060

        Axel

        --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet fauble
        <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
        >
        > Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed it!
        You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan
        >
        > ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@...> wrote: In re-
        reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
        > Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
        > I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such long
        > hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is
        feeling
        > discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their escape.
        > She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one who
        > did all the planning and he could have been there to assist Louis
        in
        > the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced, well-
        > trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even though
        > Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed, she
        > supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his wife
        > must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.
        >
        > She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They brought
        > far too much baggage, too many people and they should never have
        > ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much
        attention
        > where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
        > discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for the
        > others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when there
        > was still the possibility of escape.
        >
        > As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
        > questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the length of
        > the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
        > out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is completely
        > unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she realized,
        > she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to sound
        > more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is, Sauce
        is
        > now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
        > disguise...for surely no governess would have such an aristocratic
        > voice with such a commanding tone!
        >
        > Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it is
        > now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up for
        > the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be falling
        > apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop and
        > they are put to bed.
        > As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil down
        > and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The plans..Axel's
        > wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far away
        > now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all falling
        > apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A
        lone
        > tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
        > lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would have
        > preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is
        grateful
        > for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all
        dusty
        > and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way one
        > looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the thought
        of
        > a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.
        >
        > At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and the
        > insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness is
        > taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I can
        > take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
        > longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones towards
        > her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but she
        > can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that begs
        > command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The
        words
        > are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!!
        What
        > have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage that
        > was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed suspicion.
        > She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
        > admitted who we are!!
        >
        > Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows
        Louis.
        > As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends over
        > and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
        > Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not only
        > recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!
        >
        > These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been going
        > on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
        > discouraging journey, that should have been a successful escape,
        > but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
        > blessings to all,
        > LadyofHealingTouch
        > (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Axel"
        > <Rand103242@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
        > >
        > > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large
        ostentatious
        > > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an empty
        > > stable.
        > >
        > > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not here,
        > where
        > > are the horses ?"
        > > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
        > > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
        > >
        > > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without changing
        > > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty louis !
        > > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only
        agree
        > to
        > > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
        > center),
        > > where relay horses may be found.
        > >
        > > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
        > >
        > > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace.
        Under
        > > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and queen
        > to
        > > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new laws
        > have
        > > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their royal
        > > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette,
        > > their children and governess, the king's sister and two servants
        > > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
        > >
        > > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste
        delights
        > the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind denouncing
        > all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
        > confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading the
        > escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
        > affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has doen
        to
        > make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the family
        took
        > several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But now
        > the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last turned
        > to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris. By
        now
        > and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to be
        met
        > by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
        > >
        > > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim) is
        > > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their expected
        > escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems to
        > take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with bagage
        > and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
        > >
        > > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree to
        the
        > > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a change of
        > > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
        > >
        > > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
        > near.
        > >
        > > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village center "Stop,
        > > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms Brunier,
        > the
        > > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the small
        > coach
        > > that accompanies the berline)
        > > - « Passports? »
        > > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second coach. »
        > >
        > > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is
        Sauce,
        > > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with his
        > > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
        > > - « Where are you going to? »
        > > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
        > >
        > > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the
        wrong
        > > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
        > >
        > > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
        > > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
        > >
        > > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen is
        > in
        > > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and
        demeanor
        > remain commanding and aristocratic.
        > > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de Korff
        > (in
        > > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is silent.
        > >
        > > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
        > speaks
        > > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does she
        > wears
        > > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
        > > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something more,
        he
        > detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
        > >
        > > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
        > >
        > > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
        > strength
        > > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that
        they
        > > are in order.
        > >
        > > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He is
        > > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed. Sauce
        > > wants no trouble.
        > >
        > > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
        > stopped
        > > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
        > > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him all is
        > in
        > > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
        > >
        > > But Drouet is not put off.
        > >
        > > "Who gave you those papers?"
        > > "Was it the woman servant?"
        > > "What was she like?"
        > >
        > > Sauce shuffles and nods.
        > > "Yes, the governess.
        > > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
        > >
        > > Drouet smiles.
        > > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
        > > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
        > > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
        > > us all to hurry it up."
        > > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
        > > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was enough"
        > > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see pictures
        of
        > > her."
        > > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once saw
        > Marie
        > > Antoinette."
        > > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty blonde
        I
        > saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
        > > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me a
        > gold
        > > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
        > > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
        > coach,
        > > and it's THE KING!"
        > >
        > > Sauce protests –
        > > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two children,
        > with
        > > governess and servant.
        > >
        > > Drouet insists -
        > > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the
        Queen
        > > and their children."
        > > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would be
        > > guilty of crime. »
        > > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
        > >
        > > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to wait
        > > until tomorrow.
        > >
        > > It's half past Eleven PM,
        > >
        > > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the
        berline
        > > protest. They try to force their way out of the village. National
        > > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
        > >
        > > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend the
        > night)
        > > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
        > >
        > > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted to
        > > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers (spectators,
        > > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious onlookers)
        > may
        > > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
        > >
        > > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the Sauce
        > > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise (the
        wears
        > > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death (dog
        > tired)
        > > are put up in a bed.
        > >
        > > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like to
        > open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
        > >
        > > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must she
        be
        > thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
        > > her?
        > >
        > > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a palace.
        > Will
        > > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room
        house –
        >
        > > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
        > peasant
        > > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it? How
        > revolting!
        > >
        > > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
        > welcome.
        > > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
        > disguised
        > > King.
        > >
        > > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They are
        > > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
        > dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic and
        he
        > finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
        > >
        > > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational. He
        > > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
        > insistance,
        > > with such an arrogance.
        > >
        > > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but how
        > > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before her,
        > and
        > > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
        > > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
        > unbearable.
        > >
        > > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help but
        be
        > > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
        > > interfering. She tells them all:
        > >
        > > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
        > >
        > > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of what
        the
        > > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
        > briefly
        > > into the candle light both men again study her.
        > >
        > > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-featured
        > woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady quite
        well
        > born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men obey
        > her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect the
        > scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the pungent
        > odors of the grocer's shop.
        > >
        > > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two
        servants
        > arouse are still not enough.
        > >
        > > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce interjects. He
        > has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
        > Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the King
        a
        > lot of times.
        > >
        > > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the
        cramped
        > hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant,
        Destez
        > not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over. He
        bows
        > > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
        > >
        > > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        *********************************************************************
        > > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the
        chapter «
        > > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere Marie-
        > > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some
        editing
        > > of Pimprenelle's translation from the French and some further «
        > > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
        > installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I and
        > II and then post part III together to give the whole short story of
        > the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours which
        must
        > have seemed a lifetime to them.
        > >
        > > In this revised version, I added some background for those less
        > familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
        > Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
        > mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past read
        > accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he had
        > seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not
        enitrely
        > alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the prefumer
        > of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her famous
        > fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume, and
        that
        > she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These articles
        > speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a links to
        > an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
        > Queen" -
        >
        http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/2005052
        > 1/PERFUME21/TPTravel/
        > >
        > > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are welcome.
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel
        today!
        >
      • ladyofhealingtouch
        Thanks again,Jan. Glad that you enjoyed reading my humble writings on this. I am no writer...but love to read and have a big interest in reading of Marie
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 1, 2007
          Thanks again,Jan. Glad that you enjoyed reading my humble
          writings on this. I am no writer...but love to read and have
          a big interest in reading of Marie Antoinette and getting glimpses of
          what her personality was like and what kind of a person she was.
          So far, she is just as I thought she was...a sensitive, good hearted
          lady, wonderful mother who loved her children and thoughtful of those
          in need.
          blessings, Jan and all!
          Patricia--- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet
          fauble <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
          >
          > Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed it!
          You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan
          >
          > ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@...> wrote: In re-
          reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
          > Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
          > I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such long
          > hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is
          feeling
          > discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their escape.
          > She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one who
          > did all the planning and he could have been there to assist Louis
          in
          > the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced, well-
          > trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even though
          > Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed, she
          > supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his wife
          > must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.
          >
          > She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They brought
          > far too much baggage, too many people and they should never have
          > ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much
          attention
          > where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
          > discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for the
          > others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when there
          > was still the possibility of escape.
          >
          > As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
          > questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the length of
          > the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
          > out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is completely
          > unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she realized,
          > she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to sound
          > more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is, Sauce
          is
          > now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
          > disguise...for surely no governess would have such an aristocratic
          > voice with such a commanding tone!
          >
          > Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it is
          > now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up for
          > the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be falling
          > apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop and
          > they are put to bed.
          > As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil down
          > and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The plans..Axel's
          > wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far away
          > now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all falling
          > apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A
          lone
          > tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
          > lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would have
          > preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is
          grateful
          > for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all
          dusty
          > and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way one
          > looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the thought
          of
          > a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.
          >
          > At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and the
          > insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness is
          > taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I can
          > take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
          > longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones towards
          > her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but she
          > can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that begs
          > command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The
          words
          > are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!!
          What
          > have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage that
          > was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed suspicion.
          > She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
          > admitted who we are!!
          >
          > Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows
          Louis.
          > As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends over
          > and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
          > Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not only
          > recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!
          >
          > These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been going
          > on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
          > discouraging journey, that should have been a successful escape,
          > but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
          > blessings to all,
          > LadyofHealingTouch
          > (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Axel"
          > <Rand103242@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
          > >
          > > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large
          ostentatious
          > > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an empty
          > > stable.
          > >
          > > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not here,
          > where
          > > are the horses ?"
          > > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
          > > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
          > >
          > > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without changing
          > > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty louis !
          > > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only
          agree
          > to
          > > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
          > center),
          > > where relay horses may be found.
          > >
          > > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
          > >
          > > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace.
          Under
          > > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and queen
          > to
          > > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new laws
          > have
          > > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their royal
          > > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette,
          > > their children and governess, the king's sister and two servants
          > > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
          > >
          > > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste
          delights
          > the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind denouncing
          > all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
          > confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading the
          > escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
          > affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has doen
          to
          > make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the family
          took
          > several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But now
          > the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last turned
          > to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris. By
          now
          > and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to be
          met
          > by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
          > >
          > > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim) is
          > > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their expected
          > escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems to
          > take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with bagage
          > and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
          > >
          > > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree to
          the
          > > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a change of
          > > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
          > >
          > > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
          > near.
          > >
          > > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village center "Stop,
          > > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms Brunier,
          > the
          > > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the small
          > coach
          > > that accompanies the berline)
          > > - « Passports? »
          > > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second coach. »
          > >
          > > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is
          Sauce,
          > > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with his
          > > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
          > > - « Where are you going to? »
          > > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
          > >
          > > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the
          wrong
          > > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
          > >
          > > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
          > > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
          > >
          > > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen is
          > in
          > > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and
          demeanor
          > remain commanding and aristocratic.
          > > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de Korff
          > (in
          > > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is silent.
          > >
          > > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
          > speaks
          > > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does she
          > wears
          > > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
          > > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something more,
          he
          > detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
          > >
          > > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
          > >
          > > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
          > strength
          > > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that
          they
          > > are in order.
          > >
          > > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He is
          > > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed. Sauce
          > > wants no trouble.
          > >
          > > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
          > stopped
          > > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
          > > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him all is
          > in
          > > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
          > >
          > > But Drouet is not put off.
          > >
          > > "Who gave you those papers?"
          > > "Was it the woman servant?"
          > > "What was she like?"
          > >
          > > Sauce shuffles and nods.
          > > "Yes, the governess.
          > > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
          > >
          > > Drouet smiles.
          > > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
          > > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
          > > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
          > > us all to hurry it up."
          > > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
          > > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was enough"
          > > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see pictures
          of
          > > her."
          > > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once saw
          > Marie
          > > Antoinette."
          > > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty blonde
          I
          > saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
          > > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me a
          > gold
          > > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
          > > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
          > coach,
          > > and it's THE KING!"
          > >
          > > Sauce protests –
          > > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two children,
          > with
          > > governess and servant.
          > >
          > > Drouet insists -
          > > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the
          Queen
          > > and their children."
          > > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would be
          > > guilty of crime. »
          > > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
          > >
          > > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to wait
          > > until tomorrow.
          > >
          > > It's half past Eleven PM,
          > >
          > > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the
          berline
          > > protest. They try to force their way out of the village. National
          > > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
          > >
          > > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend the
          > night)
          > > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
          > >
          > > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted to
          > > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers (spectators,
          > > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious onlookers)
          > may
          > > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
          > >
          > > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the Sauce
          > > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise (the
          wears
          > > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death (dog
          > tired)
          > > are put up in a bed.
          > >
          > > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like to
          > open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
          > >
          > > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must she
          be
          > thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
          > > her?
          > >
          > > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a palace.
          > Will
          > > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room
          house –
          >
          > > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
          > peasant
          > > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it? How
          > revolting!
          > >
          > > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
          > welcome.
          > > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
          > disguised
          > > King.
          > >
          > > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They are
          > > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
          > dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic and
          he
          > finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
          > >
          > > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational. He
          > > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
          > insistance,
          > > with such an arrogance.
          > >
          > > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but how
          > > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before her,
          > and
          > > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
          > > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
          > unbearable.
          > >
          > > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help but
          be
          > > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
          > > interfering. She tells them all:
          > >
          > > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
          > >
          > > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of what
          the
          > > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
          > briefly
          > > into the candle light both men again study her.
          > >
          > > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-featured
          > woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady quite
          well
          > born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men obey
          > her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect the
          > scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the pungent
          > odors of the grocer's shop.
          > >
          > > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two
          servants
          > arouse are still not enough.
          > >
          > > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce interjects. He
          > has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
          > Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the King
          a
          > lot of times.
          > >
          > > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the
          cramped
          > hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant,
          Destez
          > not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over. He
          bows
          > > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
          > >
          > > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          *********************************************************************
          > > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the
          chapter «
          > > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere Marie-
          > > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some
          editing
          > > of Pimprenelle's translation from the French and some further «
          > > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
          > installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I and
          > II and then post part III together to give the whole short story of
          > the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours which
          must
          > have seemed a lifetime to them.
          > >
          > > In this revised version, I added some background for those less
          > familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
          > Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
          > mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past read
          > accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he had
          > seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not
          enitrely
          > alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the prefumer
          > of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her famous
          > fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume, and
          that
          > she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These articles
          > speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a links to
          > an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
          > Queen" -
          >
          http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/2005052
          > 1/PERFUME21/TPTravel/
          > >
          > > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are welcome.
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel
          today!
          >
        • ladyofhealingtouch
          Thank you, Axel..I appreciate your kind comments. I believe all of us enjoy being the main character in a good book and this is what I was trying to do with
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 1, 2007
            Thank you, Axel..I appreciate your kind comments. I believe all of us
            enjoy being the "main character" in a good book and this is what I
            was trying to do with Marie Antoinette, but more than that...I was
            trying to "feel" what it must have felt like for her on this
            wearisome but important journey. I really do feel like it was a big
            mistake for King Louis to dismiss Count Axel. A good leader doesn't
            dismiss the key planner of a secret mission. What is the
            saying, "cutting off one's nose to spite their face". It just makes
            no sense to me and I cannot imagine why that was done.

            I do believe Marie Antoinette probably did look back on that day and
            could see (hindsight) all the mistakes that were made, including her
            own. This is one of the reasons that I could see her wanting to put
            her head in her hands and weep. As weary as they were from that long,
            tiring journey, it is no wonder that she lost her temper...too bad
            she couldn't have held her tongue. It was a sad ending to that tiring
            journey.
            blessings to all,
            Patricia--- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Axel"
            <Rand103242@...> wrote:
            >
            > Her husband the king wanted to be a locksmith. Beautiful Marie
            > Antoinette loved acting, playing commoners, but flopped the role of
            > her life.
            >
            > In the flight to Varennes or as some call it the flight to Montmedy
            > but stopped at Varennes, King Louis and Queen Marie Antoinette
            donned
            > disguises and were to play assigned roles. Yet they were
            discovered
            > and I would suggest this was in part the result of the Queen's
            > failure as an actress.
            >
            > In the 1st of 8 segments of the narrative of Varennes - "The Queen
            > and the grocer's wife" (3 segments) and "The Queen's White Hair" (5
            > segments), Lady of Healinh Touch (Patricia) comments on this first
            > segment on the long ride, the mistakes made, bitter dissapointment
            > and the discovery of King and Queen at Varennes.
            >
            > I really like Patricia's discussion - almost putting herself in the
            > Queen's royal shoes. As I read Patricia's fine post I could feel
            the
            > intense summer heat, feel myself dirty with dust. I can imagine
            > Queen Marie Antoinette as she sweats and perspires in her royal
            > clothes - unable to change, cramped in the coach with the fussing
            > tired children, without the governess at hand, and the day - the
            > never ending day - it was June 20 the summer solstace - the sun did
            > not set til past 9pm!
            >
            > I hope others will put themselves in the role as Patricia did and
            > comment more if you can.
            > Here is a link to the original the Patricia commented on
            >
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060
            > and her comments are below.
            >
            > I hope Patricia will do it again with the next installment - "The
            > Queen and the grocer's wife - II"
            >
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5065
            >
            > My comment on what Patricia said is how Marie Antoinette failed to
            > play her part. She of all of them had at least some experience in
            > play acting - Rosina in the Barber of Seville and other roles at
            the
            > Trianon theatre.
            >
            > Yet, here is the role of her life - to save the life of herself and
            > her family, she needs to play a servant - not the sprightly barmaid
            > who catches men's attention, the love interest of the Beaumarchais
            > play as she is used to ...but a different role a real servant,
            > humble, subservient and unobtrusive - non-glamourous!!
            >
            > For the Queen, this proved a real acting challenge and it seems too
            > much out of character. Patricia points out how she spoke up ...how
            > she did so in aristocratic tones... but even more than that, true
            she
            > did not open her necessaire but was she wearing sillage perfume?
            > She had ordered special clothes for the journey - did that include
            > her governess costume? No hand-me downs for the queen and perhaps
            a
            > governess costume with a bit of pinache and fashion taste to
            flatter
            > her figure? hmmmm ... I wonder...
            >
            > I suggest that failure of the Queen to play her assigned role (and
            to
            > help Louis better play his role) as the roles should have been
            played
            > were important contibutions to their capture at Varennes in June
            1791.
            >
            > Hope others too will comment on Patricia's fine piece or on the
            > original
            >
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060
            >
            > Axel
            >
            > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet fauble
            > <janetcfauble@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed
            it!
            > You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan
            > >
            > > ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@> wrote: In re-
            > reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
            > > Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
            > > I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such long
            > > hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is
            > feeling
            > > discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their escape.
            > > She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one
            who
            > > did all the planning and he could have been there to assist Louis
            > in
            > > the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced,
            well-
            > > trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even though
            > > Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed, she
            > > supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his
            wife
            > > must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.
            > >
            > > She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They brought
            > > far too much baggage, too many people and they should never have
            > > ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much
            > attention
            > > where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
            > > discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for the
            > > others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when
            there
            > > was still the possibility of escape.
            > >
            > > As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
            > > questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the length
            of
            > > the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
            > > out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is completely
            > > unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she
            realized,
            > > she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to
            sound
            > > more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is, Sauce
            > is
            > > now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
            > > disguise...for surely no governess would have such an
            aristocratic
            > > voice with such a commanding tone!
            > >
            > > Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it
            is
            > > now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up
            for
            > > the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be falling
            > > apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop and
            > > they are put to bed.
            > > As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil
            down
            > > and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The
            plans..Axel's
            > > wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far
            away
            > > now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all
            falling
            > > apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A
            > lone
            > > tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
            > > lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would have
            > > preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is
            > grateful
            > > for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all
            > dusty
            > > and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way
            one
            > > looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the
            thought
            > of
            > > a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.
            > >
            > > At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and the
            > > insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness is
            > > taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I
            can
            > > take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
            > > longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones
            towards
            > > her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but
            she
            > > can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that begs
            > > command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The
            > words
            > > are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!!
            > What
            > > have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage
            that
            > > was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed
            suspicion.
            > > She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
            > > admitted who we are!!
            > >
            > > Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows
            > Louis.
            > > As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends
            over
            > > and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
            > > Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not only
            > > recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!
            > >
            > > These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been
            going
            > > on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
            > > discouraging journey, that should have been a successful escape,
            > > but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
            > > blessings to all,
            > > LadyofHealingTouch
            > > (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Axel"
            > > <Rand103242@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
            > > >
            > > > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large
            > ostentatious
            > > > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an
            empty
            > > > stable.
            > > >
            > > > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not here,
            > > where
            > > > are the horses ?"
            > > > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
            > > > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
            > > >
            > > > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without changing
            > > > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty louis !
            > > > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only
            > agree
            > > to
            > > > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
            > > center),
            > > > where relay horses may be found.
            > > >
            > > > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
            > > >
            > > > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace.
            > Under
            > > > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and
            queen
            > > to
            > > > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new laws
            > > have
            > > > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their royal
            > > > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie
            Antoinette,
            > > > their children and governess, the king's sister and two
            servants
            > > > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
            > > >
            > > > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste
            > delights
            > > the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind
            denouncing
            > > all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
            > > confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading
            the
            > > escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
            > > affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has doen
            > to
            > > make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the family
            > took
            > > several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But
            now
            > > the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last
            turned
            > > to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris. By
            > now
            > > and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to be
            > met
            > > by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
            > > >
            > > > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim)
            is
            > > > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their expected
            > > escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems to
            > > take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with
            bagage
            > > and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
            > > >
            > > > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree to
            > the
            > > > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a change
            of
            > > > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
            > > >
            > > > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
            > > near.
            > > >
            > > > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village center "Stop,
            > > > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms
            Brunier,
            > > the
            > > > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the small
            > > coach
            > > > that accompanies the berline)
            > > > - « Passports? »
            > > > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second coach. »
            > > >
            > > > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is
            > Sauce,
            > > > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with
            his
            > > > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
            > > > - « Where are you going to? »
            > > > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
            > > >
            > > > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the
            > wrong
            > > > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
            > > >
            > > > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
            > > > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
            > > >
            > > > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen
            is
            > > in
            > > > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and
            > demeanor
            > > remain commanding and aristocratic.
            > > > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de
            Korff
            > > (in
            > > > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is
            silent.
            > > >
            > > > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
            > > speaks
            > > > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does she
            > > wears
            > > > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
            > > > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something
            more,
            > he
            > > detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
            > > >
            > > > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
            > > >
            > > > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
            > > strength
            > > > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that
            > they
            > > > are in order.
            > > >
            > > > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He
            is
            > > > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed.
            Sauce
            > > > wants no trouble.
            > > >
            > > > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
            > > stopped
            > > > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
            > > > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him all
            is
            > > in
            > > > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
            > > >
            > > > But Drouet is not put off.
            > > >
            > > > "Who gave you those papers?"
            > > > "Was it the woman servant?"
            > > > "What was she like?"
            > > >
            > > > Sauce shuffles and nods.
            > > > "Yes, the governess.
            > > > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
            > > >
            > > > Drouet smiles.
            > > > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
            > > > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
            > > > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
            > > > us all to hurry it up."
            > > > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
            > > > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was enough"
            > > > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see pictures
            > of
            > > > her."
            > > > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once saw
            > > Marie
            > > > Antoinette."
            > > > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty
            blonde
            > I
            > > saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
            > > > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me a
            > > gold
            > > > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
            > > > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
            > > coach,
            > > > and it's THE KING!"
            > > >
            > > > Sauce protests –
            > > > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two children,
            > > with
            > > > governess and servant.
            > > >
            > > > Drouet insists -
            > > > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the
            > Queen
            > > > and their children."
            > > > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would be
            > > > guilty of crime. »
            > > > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
            > > >
            > > > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to wait
            > > > until tomorrow.
            > > >
            > > > It's half past Eleven PM,
            > > >
            > > > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the
            > berline
            > > > protest. They try to force their way out of the village.
            National
            > > > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
            > > >
            > > > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend the
            > > night)
            > > > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
            > > >
            > > > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted to
            > > > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers (spectators,
            > > > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious
            onlookers)
            > > may
            > > > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
            > > >
            > > > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the
            Sauce
            > > > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise (the
            > wears
            > > > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death (dog
            > > tired)
            > > > are put up in a bed.
            > > >
            > > > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like
            to
            > > open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
            > > >
            > > > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must
            she
            > be
            > > thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
            > > > her?
            > > >
            > > > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a palace.
            > > Will
            > > > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room
            > house –
            > >
            > > > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
            > > peasant
            > > > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it? How
            > > revolting!
            > > >
            > > > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
            > > welcome.
            > > > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
            > > disguised
            > > > King.
            > > >
            > > > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They are
            > > > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
            > > dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic
            and
            > he
            > > finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
            > > >
            > > > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational. He
            > > > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
            > > insistance,
            > > > with such an arrogance.
            > > >
            > > > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but
            how
            > > > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before her,
            > > and
            > > > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
            > > > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
            > > unbearable.
            > > >
            > > > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help
            but
            > be
            > > > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
            > > > interfering. She tells them all:
            > > >
            > > > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
            > > >
            > > > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of what
            > the
            > > > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
            > > briefly
            > > > into the candle light both men again study her.
            > > >
            > > > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-featured
            > > woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady quite
            > well
            > > born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men obey
            > > her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect
            the
            > > scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the
            pungent
            > > odors of the grocer's shop.
            > > >
            > > > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two
            > servants
            > > arouse are still not enough.
            > > >
            > > > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce interjects.
            He
            > > has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
            > > Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the
            King
            > a
            > > lot of times.
            > > >
            > > > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the
            > cramped
            > > hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant,
            > Destez
            > > not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over. He
            > bows
            > > > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
            > > >
            > > > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            *********************************************************************
            > > > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the
            > chapter «
            > > > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere
            Marie-
            > > > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some
            > editing
            > > > of Pimprenelle's translation from the French and some further «
            > > > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
            > > installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I
            and
            > > II and then post part III together to give the whole short story
            of
            > > the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours which
            > must
            > > have seemed a lifetime to them.
            > > >
            > > > In this revised version, I added some background for those less
            > > familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
            > > Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
            > > mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past read
            > > accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he
            had
            > > seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not
            > enitrely
            > > alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the
            prefumer
            > > of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her famous
            > > fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume, and
            > that
            > > she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These
            articles
            > > speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a links
            to
            > > an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
            > > Queen" -
            > >
            >
            http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/2005052
            > > 1/PERFUME21/TPTravel/
            > > >
            > > > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are
            welcome.
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ---------------------------------
            > > Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel
            > today!
            > >
            >
          • janet fauble
            Yes, Axel, I really liked Patricia s writing style too, and thank you for letting her put it on the board. I admire her courage for feeling so free and
            Message 5 of 19 , Aug 4, 2007
              Yes, Axel, I really liked Patricia's writing style too, and thank you for letting her put it on the board. I admire her courage for feeling so free and confident to write like that. Jan

              Axel <Rand103242@...> wrote:
              Her husband the king wanted to be a locksmith. Beautiful Marie
              Antoinette loved acting, playing commoners, but flopped the role of
              her life.

              In the flight to Varennes or as some call it the flight to Montmedy
              but stopped at Varennes, King Louis and Queen Marie Antoinette donned
              disguises and were to play assigned roles. Yet they were discovered
              and I would suggest this was in part the result of the Queen's
              failure as an actress.

              In the 1st of 8 segments of the narrative of Varennes - "The Queen
              and the grocer's wife" (3 segments) and "The Queen's White Hair" (5
              segments), Lady of Healinh Touch (Patricia) comments on this first
              segment on the long ride, the mistakes made, bitter dissapointment
              and the discovery of King and Queen at Varennes.

              I really like Patricia's discussion - almost putting herself in the
              Queen's royal shoes. As I read Patricia's fine post I could feel the
              intense summer heat, feel myself dirty with dust. I can imagine
              Queen Marie Antoinette as she sweats and perspires in her royal
              clothes - unable to change, cramped in the coach with the fussing
              tired children, without the governess at hand, and the day - the
              never ending day - it was June 20 the summer solstace - the sun did
              not set til past 9pm!

              I hope others will put themselves in the role as Patricia did and
              comment more if you can.
              Here is a link to the original the Patricia commented on
              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ message/5060
              and her comments are below.

              I hope Patricia will do it again with the next installment - "The
              Queen and the grocer's wife - II"
              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ message/5065

              My comment on what Patricia said is how Marie Antoinette failed to
              play her part. She of all of them had at least some experience in
              play acting - Rosina in the Barber of Seville and other roles at the
              Trianon theatre.

              Yet, here is the role of her life - to save the life of herself and
              her family, she needs to play a servant - not the sprightly barmaid
              who catches men's attention, the love interest of the Beaumarchais
              play as she is used to ...but a different role a real servant,
              humble, subservient and unobtrusive - non-glamourous! !

              For the Queen, this proved a real acting challenge and it seems too
              much out of character. Patricia points out how she spoke up ...how
              she did so in aristocratic tones... but even more than that, true she
              did not open her necessaire but was she wearing sillage perfume?
              She had ordered special clothes for the journey - did that include
              her governess costume? No hand-me downs for the queen and perhaps a
              governess costume with a bit of pinache and fashion taste to flatter
              her figure? hmmmm ... I wonder...

              I suggest that failure of the Queen to play her assigned role (and to
              help Louis better play his role) as the roles should have been played
              were important contibutions to their capture at Varennes in June 1791.

              Hope others too will comment on Patricia's fine piece or on the
              original
              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ message/5060

              Axel

              --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, janet fauble
              <janetcfauble@ ...> wrote:
              >
              > Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed it!
              You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan
              >
              > ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@ ...> wrote: In re-
              reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
              > Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
              > I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such long
              > hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is
              feeling
              > discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their escape.
              > She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one who
              > did all the planning and he could have been there to assist Louis
              in
              > the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced, well-
              > trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even though
              > Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed, she
              > supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his wife
              > must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.
              >
              > She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They brought
              > far too much baggage, too many people and they should never have
              > ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much
              attention
              > where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
              > discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for the
              > others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when there
              > was still the possibility of escape.
              >
              > As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
              > questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the length of
              > the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
              > out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is completely
              > unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she realized,
              > she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to sound
              > more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is, Sauce
              is
              > now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
              > disguise...for surely no governess would have such an aristocratic
              > voice with such a commanding tone!
              >
              > Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it is
              > now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up for
              > the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be falling
              > apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop and
              > they are put to bed.
              > As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil down
              > and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The plans..Axel' s
              > wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far away
              > now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all falling
              > apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A
              lone
              > tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
              > lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would have
              > preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is
              grateful
              > for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all
              dusty
              > and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way one
              > looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the thought
              of
              > a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.
              >
              > At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and the
              > insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness is
              > taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I can
              > take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
              > longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones towards
              > her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but she
              > can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that begs
              > command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The
              words
              > are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!!
              What
              > have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage that
              > was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed suspicion.
              > She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
              > admitted who we are!!
              >
              > Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows
              Louis.
              > As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends over
              > and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
              > Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not only
              > recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!
              >
              > These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been going
              > on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
              > discouraging journey, that should have been a successful escape,
              > but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
              > blessings to all,
              > LadyofHealingTouch
              > (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "Axel"
              > <Rand103242@ > wrote:
              > >
              > > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
              > >
              > > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large
              ostentatious
              > > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an empty
              > > stable.
              > >
              > > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not here,
              > where
              > > are the horses ?"
              > > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
              > > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
              > >
              > > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without changing
              > > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty louis !
              > > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only
              agree
              > to
              > > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
              > center),
              > > where relay horses may be found.
              > >
              > > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
              > >
              > > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace.
              Under
              > > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and queen
              > to
              > > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new laws
              > have
              > > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their royal
              > > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette,
              > > their children and governess, the king's sister and two servants
              > > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
              > >
              > > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste
              delights
              > the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind denouncing
              > all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
              > confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading the
              > escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
              > affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has doen
              to
              > make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the family
              took
              > several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But now
              > the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last turned
              > to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris. By
              now
              > and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to be
              met
              > by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
              > >
              > > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim) is
              > > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their expected
              > escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems to
              > take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with bagage
              > and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
              > >
              > > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree to
              the
              > > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a change of
              > > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
              > >
              > > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
              > near.
              > >
              > > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village center "Stop,
              > > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms Brunier,
              > the
              > > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the small
              > coach
              > > that accompanies the berline)
              > > - « Passports? »
              > > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second coach. »
              > >
              > > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is
              Sauce,
              > > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with his
              > > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
              > > - « Where are you going to? »
              > > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
              > >
              > > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the
              wrong
              > > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
              > >
              > > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
              > > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
              > >
              > > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen is
              > in
              > > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and
              demeanor
              > remain commanding and aristocratic.
              > > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de Korff
              > (in
              > > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is silent.
              > >
              > > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
              > speaks
              > > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does she
              > wears
              > > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
              > > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something more,
              he
              > detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
              > >
              > > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
              > >
              > > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
              > strength
              > > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that
              they
              > > are in order.
              > >
              > > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He is
              > > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed. Sauce
              > > wants no trouble.
              > >
              > > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
              > stopped
              > > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
              > > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him all is
              > in
              > > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
              > >
              > > But Drouet is not put off.
              > >
              > > "Who gave you those papers?"
              > > "Was it the woman servant?"
              > > "What was she like?"
              > >
              > > Sauce shuffles and nods.
              > > "Yes, the governess.
              > > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
              > >
              > > Drouet smiles.
              > > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
              > > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
              > > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
              > > us all to hurry it up."
              > > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
              > > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was enough"
              > > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see pictures
              of
              > > her."
              > > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once saw
              > Marie
              > > Antoinette."
              > > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty blonde
              I
              > saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
              > > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me a
              > gold
              > > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
              > > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
              > coach,
              > > and it's THE KING!"
              > >
              > > Sauce protests –
              > > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two children,
              > with
              > > governess and servant.
              > >
              > > Drouet insists -
              > > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the
              Queen
              > > and their children."
              > > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would be
              > > guilty of crime. »
              > > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
              > >
              > > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to wait
              > > until tomorrow.
              > >
              > > It's half past Eleven PM,
              > >
              > > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the
              berline
              > > protest. They try to force their way out of the village. National
              > > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
              > >
              > > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend the
              > night)
              > > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
              > >
              > > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted to
              > > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers (spectators,
              > > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious onlookers)
              > may
              > > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
              > >
              > > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the Sauce
              > > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise (the
              wears
              > > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death (dog
              > tired)
              > > are put up in a bed.
              > >
              > > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like to
              > open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
              > >
              > > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must she
              be
              > thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
              > > her?
              > >
              > > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a palace.
              > Will
              > > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room
              house –
              >
              > > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
              > peasant
              > > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it? How
              > revolting!
              > >
              > > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
              > welcome.
              > > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
              > disguised
              > > King.
              > >
              > > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They are
              > > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
              > dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic and
              he
              > finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
              > >
              > > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational. He
              > > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
              > insistance,
              > > with such an arrogance.
              > >
              > > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but how
              > > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before her,
              > and
              > > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
              > > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
              > unbearable.
              > >
              > > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help but
              be
              > > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
              > > interfering. She tells them all:
              > >
              > > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
              > >
              > > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of what
              the
              > > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
              > briefly
              > > into the candle light both men again study her.
              > >
              > > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-featured
              > woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady quite
              well
              > born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men obey
              > her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect the
              > scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the pungent
              > odors of the grocer's shop.
              > >
              > > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two
              servants
              > arouse are still not enough.
              > >
              > > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce interjects. He
              > has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
              > Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the King
              a
              > lot of times.
              > >
              > > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the
              cramped
              > hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant,
              Destez
              > not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over. He
              bows
              > > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
              > >
              > > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ********* ********* ***
              > > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the
              chapter «
              > > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere Marie-
              > > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some
              editing
              > > of Pimprenelle' s translation from the French and some further «
              > > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
              > installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I and
              > II and then post part III together to give the whole short story of
              > the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours which
              must
              > have seemed a lifetime to them.
              > >
              > > In this revised version, I added some background for those less
              > familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
              > Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
              > mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past read
              > accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he had
              > seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not
              enitrely
              > alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the prefumer
              > of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her famous
              > fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume, and
              that
              > she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These articles
              > speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a links to
              > an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
              > Queen" -
              >
              http://www.theglobe andmail.com/ servlet/ArticleN ews/TPStory/ LAC/2005052
              > 1/PERFUME21/ TPTravel/
              > >
              > > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are welcome.
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------ --------- --------- ---
              > Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research Panel
              today!
              >



              Park yourself in front of a world of choices in alternative vehicles.
              Visit the Yahoo! Auto Green Center.

            • Axel
              Patricia, Your comments are so moving. You really do get into character and we all can feel the complex character of Marie Antoinette through you. Please do
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 6, 2007
                Patricia,

                Your comments are so moving. You really do get into character and we
                all can feel the complex character of Marie Antoinette through you.
                Please do continue this tale hope, peril and high drama - please
                share with us you thoughts and feelings as the Queen of France now
                spends a night in the humble house of Sauce... the Queen and the
                Grocer's wife, part II...

                Axel

                --- In
                Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "ladyofhealingtouch"
                <MadameAntoine@...> wrote:

                >
                > Thank you, Axel..I appreciate your kind comments.

                I believe all of us
                > enjoy being the "main character" in a good book and this is what I
                > was trying to do with Marie Antoinette, but more than that...I was
                > trying to "feel" what it must have felt like for her on this
                > wearisome but important journey.
                >
                > blessings to all,
                > Patricia

                --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Axel"
                > <Rand103242@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Her husband the king wanted to be a locksmith. Beautiful Marie
                > > Antoinette loved acting, playing commoners, but flopped the role
                of
                > > her life.
                > >
                > > In the flight to Varennes or as some call it the flight to
                Montmedy
                > > but stopped at Varennes, King Louis and Queen Marie Antoinette
                > donned
                > > disguises and were to play assigned roles. Yet they were
                > discovered
                > > and I would suggest this was in part the result of the Queen's
                > > failure as an actress.
                > >
                > > In the 1st of 8 segments of the narrative of Varennes - "The
                Queen
                > > and the grocer's wife" (3 segments) and "The Queen's White Hair"
                (5
                > > segments), Lady of Healinh Touch (Patricia) comments on this
                first
                > > segment on the long ride, the mistakes made, bitter
                dissapointment
                > > and the discovery of King and Queen at Varennes.
                > >
                > > I really like Patricia's discussion - almost putting herself in
                the
                > > Queen's royal shoes. As I read Patricia's fine post I could feel
                > the
                > > intense summer heat, feel myself dirty with dust. I can imagine
                > > Queen Marie Antoinette as she sweats and perspires in her royal
                > > clothes - unable to change, cramped in the coach with the
                fussing
                > > tired children, without the governess at hand, and the day - the
                > > never ending day - it was June 20 the summer solstace - the sun
                did
                > > not set til past 9pm!
                > >
                > > I hope others will put themselves in the role as Patricia did
                and
                > > comment more if you can.
                > > Here is a link to the original the Patricia commented on
                > >
                >
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060
                > > and her comments are below.
                > >
                > > I hope Patricia will do it again with the next installment - "The
                > > Queen and the grocer's wife - II"
                > >
                >
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5065
                > >
                > > My comment on what Patricia said is how Marie Antoinette failed
                to
                > > play her part. She of all of them had at least some experience
                in
                > > play acting - Rosina in the Barber of Seville and other roles at
                > the
                > > Trianon theatre.
                > >
                > > Yet, here is the role of her life - to save the life of herself
                and
                > > her family, she needs to play a servant - not the sprightly
                barmaid
                > > who catches men's attention, the love interest of the
                Beaumarchais
                > > play as she is used to ...but a different role a real servant,
                > > humble, subservient and unobtrusive - non-glamourous!!
                > >
                > > For the Queen, this proved a real acting challenge and it seems
                too
                > > much out of character. Patricia points out how she spoke
                up ...how
                > > she did so in aristocratic tones... but even more than that, true
                > she
                > > did not open her necessaire but was she wearing sillage perfume?
                > > She had ordered special clothes for the journey - did that
                include
                > > her governess costume? No hand-me downs for the queen and
                perhaps
                > a
                > > governess costume with a bit of pinache and fashion taste to
                > flatter
                > > her figure? hmmmm ... I wonder...
                > >
                > > I suggest that failure of the Queen to play her assigned role
                (and
                > to
                > > help Louis better play his role) as the roles should have been
                > played
                > > were important contibutions to their capture at Varennes in June
                > 1791.
                > >
                > > Hope others too will comment on Patricia's fine piece or on the
                > > original
                > >
                >
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060
                > >
                > > Axel
                > >
                > > --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet fauble
                > > <janetcfauble@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed
                > it!
                > > You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan
                > > >
                > > > ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@> wrote: In re-
                > > reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
                > > > Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
                > > > I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such
                long
                > > > hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is
                > > feeling
                > > > discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their
                escape.
                > > > She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one
                > who
                > > > did all the planning and he could have been there to assist
                Louis
                > > in
                > > > the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced,
                > well-
                > > > trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even
                though
                > > > Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed,
                she
                > > > supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his
                > wife
                > > > must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.
                > > >
                > > > She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They
                brought
                > > > far too much baggage, too many people and they should never
                have
                > > > ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much
                > > attention
                > > > where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
                > > > discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for
                the
                > > > others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when
                > there
                > > > was still the possibility of escape.
                > > >
                > > > As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
                > > > questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the
                length
                > of
                > > > the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
                > > > out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is
                completely
                > > > unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she
                > realized,
                > > > she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to
                > sound
                > > > more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is,
                Sauce
                > > is
                > > > now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
                > > > disguise...for surely no governess would have such an
                > aristocratic
                > > > voice with such a commanding tone!
                > > >
                > > > Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it
                > is
                > > > now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up
                > for
                > > > the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be
                falling
                > > > apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop
                and
                > > > they are put to bed.
                > > > As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil
                > down
                > > > and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The
                > plans..Axel's
                > > > wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far
                > away
                > > > now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all
                > falling
                > > > apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A
                > > lone
                > > > tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
                > > > lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would
                have
                > > > preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is
                > > grateful
                > > > for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all
                > > dusty
                > > > and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way
                > one
                > > > looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the
                > thought
                > > of
                > > > a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.
                > > >
                > > > At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and
                the
                > > > insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness
                is
                > > > taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I
                > can
                > > > take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
                > > > longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones
                > towards
                > > > her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but
                > she
                > > > can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that
                begs
                > > > command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The
                > > words
                > > > are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!!
                > > What
                > > > have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage
                > that
                > > > was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed
                > suspicion.
                > > > She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
                > > > admitted who we are!!
                > > >
                > > > Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows
                > > Louis.
                > > > As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends
                > over
                > > > and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
                > > > Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not
                only
                > > > recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!
                > > >
                > > > These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been
                > going
                > > > on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
                > > > discouraging journey, that should have been a successful
                escape,
                > > > but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
                > > > blessings to all,
                > > > LadyofHealingTouch
                > > > (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "Axel"
                > > > <Rand103242@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
                > > > >
                > > > > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large
                > > ostentatious
                > > > > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an
                > empty
                > > > > stable.
                > > > >
                > > > > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not
                here,
                > > > where
                > > > > are the horses ?"
                > > > > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
                > > > > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
                > > > >
                > > > > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without
                changing
                > > > > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty
                louis !
                > > > > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only
                > > agree
                > > > to
                > > > > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
                > > > center),
                > > > > where relay horses may be found.
                > > > >
                > > > > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
                > > > >
                > > > > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace.
                > > Under
                > > > > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and
                > queen
                > > > to
                > > > > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new
                laws
                > > > have
                > > > > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their
                royal
                > > > > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie
                > Antoinette,
                > > > > their children and governess, the king's sister and two
                > servants
                > > > > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
                > > > >
                > > > > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste
                > > delights
                > > > the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind
                > denouncing
                > > > all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
                > > > confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading
                > the
                > > > escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
                > > > affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has
                doen
                > > to
                > > > make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the
                family
                > > took
                > > > several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But
                > now
                > > > the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last
                > turned
                > > > to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris.
                By
                > > now
                > > > and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to
                be
                > > met
                > > > by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
                > > > >
                > > > > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim)
                > is
                > > > > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their
                expected
                > > > escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems
                to
                > > > take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with
                > bagage
                > > > and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
                > > > >
                > > > > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree
                to
                > > the
                > > > > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a
                change
                > of
                > > > > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
                > > > >
                > > > > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
                > > > near.
                > > > >
                > > > > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village
                center "Stop,
                > > > > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms
                > Brunier,
                > > > the
                > > > > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the
                small
                > > > coach
                > > > > that accompanies the berline)
                > > > > - « Passports? »
                > > > > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second
                coach. »
                > > > >
                > > > > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is
                > > Sauce,
                > > > > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with
                > his
                > > > > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
                > > > > - « Where are you going to? »
                > > > > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the
                > > wrong
                > > > > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
                > > > >
                > > > > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
                > > > > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
                > > > >
                > > > > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen
                > is
                > > > in
                > > > > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and
                > > demeanor
                > > > remain commanding and aristocratic.
                > > > > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de
                > Korff
                > > > (in
                > > > > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is
                > silent.
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
                > > > speaks
                > > > > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does
                she
                > > > wears
                > > > > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
                > > > > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something
                > more,
                > > he
                > > > detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
                > > > strength
                > > > > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that
                > > they
                > > > > are in order.
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He
                > is
                > > > > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed.
                > Sauce
                > > > > wants no trouble.
                > > > >
                > > > > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
                > > > stopped
                > > > > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
                > > > > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him
                all
                > is
                > > > in
                > > > > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
                > > > >
                > > > > But Drouet is not put off.
                > > > >
                > > > > "Who gave you those papers?"
                > > > > "Was it the woman servant?"
                > > > > "What was she like?"
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce shuffles and nods.
                > > > > "Yes, the governess.
                > > > > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
                > > > >
                > > > > Drouet smiles.
                > > > > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
                > > > > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
                > > > > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
                > > > > us all to hurry it up."
                > > > > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
                > > > > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was
                enough"
                > > > > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see
                pictures
                > > of
                > > > > her."
                > > > > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once
                saw
                > > > Marie
                > > > > Antoinette."
                > > > > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty
                > blonde
                > > I
                > > > saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
                > > > > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me
                a
                > > > gold
                > > > > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
                > > > > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
                > > > coach,
                > > > > and it's THE KING!"
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce protests –
                > > > > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two
                children,
                > > > with
                > > > > governess and servant.
                > > > >
                > > > > Drouet insists -
                > > > > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the
                > > Queen
                > > > > and their children."
                > > > > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would
                be
                > > > > guilty of crime. »
                > > > > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
                > > > >
                > > > > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to
                wait
                > > > > until tomorrow.
                > > > >
                > > > > It's half past Eleven PM,
                > > > >
                > > > > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the
                > > berline
                > > > > protest. They try to force their way out of the village.
                > National
                > > > > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
                > > > >
                > > > > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend
                the
                > > > night)
                > > > > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
                > > > >
                > > > > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted
                to
                > > > > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers
                (spectators,
                > > > > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious
                > onlookers)
                > > > may
                > > > > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
                > > > >
                > > > > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the
                > Sauce
                > > > > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise
                (the
                > > wears
                > > > > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death
                (dog
                > > > tired)
                > > > > are put up in a bed.
                > > > >
                > > > > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like
                > to
                > > > open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
                > > > >
                > > > > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must
                > she
                > > be
                > > > thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
                > > > > her?
                > > > >
                > > > > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a
                palace.
                > > > Will
                > > > > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room
                > > house –
                > > >
                > > > > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
                > > > peasant
                > > > > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it?
                How
                > > > revolting!
                > > > >
                > > > > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
                > > > welcome.
                > > > > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
                > > > disguised
                > > > > King.
                > > > >
                > > > > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They
                are
                > > > > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
                > > > dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic
                > and
                > > he
                > > > finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
                > > > >
                > > > > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational.
                He
                > > > > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
                > > > insistance,
                > > > > with such an arrogance.
                > > > >
                > > > > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but
                > how
                > > > > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before
                her,
                > > > and
                > > > > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
                > > > > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
                > > > unbearable.
                > > > >
                > > > > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help
                > but
                > > be
                > > > > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
                > > > > interfering. She tells them all:
                > > > >
                > > > > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
                > > > >
                > > > > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of
                what
                > > the
                > > > > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
                > > > briefly
                > > > > into the candle light both men again study her.
                > > > >
                > > > > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-
                featured
                > > > woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady
                quite
                > > well
                > > > born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men
                obey
                > > > her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect
                > the
                > > > scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the
                > pungent
                > > > odors of the grocer's shop.
                > > > >
                > > > > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two
                > > servants
                > > > arouse are still not enough.
                > > > >
                > > > > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce
                interjects.
                > He
                > > > has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
                > > > Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the
                > King
                > > a
                > > > lot of times.
                > > > >
                > > > > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the
                > > cramped
                > > > hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant,
                > > Destez
                > > > not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over.
                He
                > > bows
                > > > > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
                > > > >
                > > > > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
                *********************************************************************
                > > > > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the
                > > chapter «
                > > > > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere
                > Marie-
                > > > > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some
                > > editing
                > > > > of Pimprenelle's translation from the French and some
                further «
                > > > > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
                > > > installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I
                > and
                > > > II and then post part III together to give the whole short
                story
                > of
                > > > the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours
                which
                > > must
                > > > have seemed a lifetime to them.
                > > > >
                > > > > In this revised version, I added some background for those
                less
                > > > familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
                > > > Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
                > > > mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past
                read
                > > > accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he
                > had
                > > > seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not
                > > enitrely
                > > > alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the
                > prefumer
                > > > of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her
                famous
                > > > fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume,
                and
                > > that
                > > > she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These
                > articles
                > > > speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a
                links
                > to
                > > > an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
                > > > Queen" -
                > > >
                > >
                >
                http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/2005052
                > > > 1/PERFUME21/TPTravel/
                > > > >
                > > > > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are
                > welcome.
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > ---------------------------------
                > > > Shape Yahoo! in your own image. Join our Network Research
                Panel
                > > today!
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • Barbara
                While Marie might not have been a good actress, another reason and perhaps the main reason Marie and Louis carriage was stopped was because it was a large and
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 9, 2007
                  While Marie might not have been a good actress, another reason and perhaps the main reason Marie and Louis' carriage was stopped was because it was a large and fancy carriage loaded with suitcases, etc. on top.  These were the days when you wanted to disguise the fact that you were rich, not flaunt it as did Marie and Louis - as such, they drew suspicion upon themselves before Marie ever had a chance to try out her acting skills.

                  janet fauble <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
                  Yes, Axel, I really liked Patricia's writing style too, and thank you for letting her put it on the board. I admire her courage for feeling so free and confident to write like that. Jan

                  Axel <Rand103242@cs. com> wrote:
                  Her husband the king wanted to be a locksmith. Beautiful Marie
                  Antoinette loved acting, playing commoners, but flopped the role of
                  her life.

                  In the flight to Varennes or as some call it the flight to Montmedy
                  but stopped at Varennes, King Louis and Queen Marie Antoinette donned
                  disguises and were to play assigned roles. Yet they were discovered
                  and I would suggest this was in part the result of the Queen's
                  failure as an actress.

                  In the 1st of 8 segments of the narrative of Varennes - "The Queen
                  and the grocer's wife" (3 segments) and "The Queen's White Hair" (5
                  segments), Lady of Healinh Touch (Patricia) comments on this first
                  segment on the long ride, the mistakes made, bitter dissapointment
                  and the discovery of King and Queen at Varennes.

                  I really like Patricia's discussion - almost putting herself in the
                  Queen's royal shoes. As I read Patricia's fine post I could feel the
                  intense summer heat, feel myself dirty with dust. I can imagine
                  Queen Marie Antoinette as she sweats and perspires in her royal
                  clothes - unable to change, cramped in the coach with the fussing
                  tired children, without the governess at hand, and the day - the
                  never ending day - it was June 20 the summer solstace - the sun did
                  not set til past 9pm!

                  I hope others will put themselves in the role as Patricia did and
                  comment more if you can.
                  Here is a link to the original the Patricia commented on
                  http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ message/5060
                  and her comments are below.

                  I hope Patricia will do it again with the next installment - "The
                  Queen and the grocer's wife - II"
                  http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ message/5065

                  My comment on what Patricia said is how Marie Antoinette failed to
                  play her part. She of all of them had at least some experience in
                  play acting - Rosina in the Barber of Seville and other roles at the
                  Trianon theatre.

                  Yet, here is the role of her life - to save the life of herself and
                  her family, she needs to play a servant - not the sprightly barmaid
                  who catches men's attention, the love interest of the Beaumarchais
                  play as she is used to ...but a different role a real servant,
                  humble, subservient and unobtrusive - non-glamourous! !

                  For the Queen, this proved a real acting challenge and it seems too
                  much out of character. Patricia points out how she spoke up ...how
                  she did so in aristocratic tones... but even more than that, true she
                  did not open her necessaire but was she wearing sillage perfume?
                  She had ordered special clothes for the journey - did that include
                  her governess costume? No hand-me downs for the queen and perhaps a
                  governess costume with a bit of pinache and fashion taste to flatter
                  her figure? hmmmm ... I wonder...

                  I suggest that failure of the Queen to play her assigned role (and to
                  help Louis better play his role) as the roles should have been played
                  were important contibutions to their capture at Varennes in June 1791.

                  Hope others too will comment on Patricia's fine piece or on the
                  original
                  http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Images_ of_Marie_ Antoinette/ message/5060

                  Axel

                  --- In Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, janet fauble
                  <janetcfauble@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed it!
                  You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan
                  >
                  > ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@ ...> wrote: In re-
                  reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
                  > Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
                  > I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such long
                  > hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is
                  feeling
                  > discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their escape.
                  > She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one who
                  > did all the planning and he could have been there to assist Louis
                  in
                  > the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced, well-
                  > trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even though
                  > Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed, she
                  > supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his wife
                  > must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.
                  >
                  > She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They brought
                  > far too much baggage, too many people and they should never have
                  > ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much
                  attention
                  > where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
                  > discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for the
                  > others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when there
                  > was still the possibility of escape.
                  >
                  > As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
                  > questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the length of
                  > the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
                  > out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is completely
                  > unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she realized,
                  > she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to sound
                  > more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is, Sauce
                  is
                  > now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
                  > disguise...for surely no governess would have such an aristocratic
                  > voice with such a commanding tone!
                  >
                  > Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it is
                  > now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up for
                  > the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be falling
                  > apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop and
                  > they are put to bed.
                  > As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil down
                  > and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The plans..Axel' s
                  > wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far away
                  > now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all falling
                  > apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A
                  lone
                  > tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
                  > lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would have
                  > preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is
                  grateful
                  > for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all
                  dusty
                  > and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way one
                  > looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the thought
                  of
                  > a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.
                  >
                  > At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and the
                  > insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness is
                  > taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I can
                  > take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
                  > longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones towards
                  > her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but she
                  > can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that begs
                  > command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The
                  words
                  > are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!!
                  What
                  > have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage that
                  > was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed suspicion.
                  > She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
                  > admitted who we are!!
                  >
                  > Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows
                  Louis.
                  > As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends over
                  > and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
                  > Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not only
                  > recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!
                  >
                  > These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been going
                  > on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
                  > discouraging journey, that should have been a successful escape,
                  > but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
                  > blessings to all,
                  > LadyofHealingTouch
                  > (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_ Antoinette@ yahoogroups. com, "Axel"
                  > <Rand103242@ > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
                  > >
                  > > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large
                  ostentatious
                  > > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an empty
                  > > stable.
                  > >
                  > > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not here,
                  > where
                  > > are the horses ?"
                  > > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
                  > > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
                  > >
                  > > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without changing
                  > > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty louis !
                  > > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only
                  agree
                  > to
                  > > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
                  > center),
                  > > where relay horses may be found.
                  > >
                  > > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
                  > >
                  > > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace.
                  Under
                  > > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and queen
                  > to
                  > > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new laws
                  > have
                  > > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their royal
                  > > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette,
                  > > their children and governess, the king's sister and two servants
                  > > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
                  > >
                  > > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste
                  delights
                  > the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind denouncing
                  > all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
                  > confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading the
                  > escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
                  > affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has doen
                  to
                  > make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the family
                  took
                  > several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But now
                  > the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last turned
                  > to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris. By
                  now
                  > and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to be
                  met
                  > by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
                  > >
                  > > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim) is
                  > > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their expected
                  > escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems to
                  > take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with bagage
                  > and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
                  > >
                  > > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree to
                  the
                  > > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a change of
                  > > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
                  > >
                  > > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
                  > near.
                  > >
                  > > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village center "Stop,
                  > > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms Brunier,
                  > the
                  > > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the small
                  > coach
                  > > that accompanies the berline)
                  > > - « Passports? »
                  > > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second coach. »
                  > >
                  > > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is
                  Sauce,
                  > > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with his
                  > > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
                  > > - « Where are you going to? »
                  > > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
                  > >
                  > > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the
                  wrong
                  > > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
                  > >
                  > > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
                  > > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
                  > >
                  > > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen is
                  > in
                  > > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and
                  demeanor
                  > remain commanding and aristocratic.
                  > > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de Korff
                  > (in
                  > > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is silent.
                  > >
                  > > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
                  > speaks
                  > > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does she
                  > wears
                  > > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
                  > > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something more,
                  he
                  > detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
                  > >
                  > > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
                  > >
                  > > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
                  > strength
                  > > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that
                  they
                  > > are in order.
                  > >
                  > > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He is
                  > > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed. Sauce
                  > > wants no trouble.
                  > >
                  > > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
                  > stopped
                  > > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
                  > > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him all is
                  > in
                  > > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
                  > >
                  > > But Drouet is not put off.
                  > >
                  > > "Who gave you those papers?"
                  > > "Was it the woman servant?"
                  > > "What was she like?"
                  > >
                  > > Sauce shuffles and nods.
                  > > "Yes, the governess.
                  > > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
                  > >
                  > > Drouet smiles.
                  > > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
                  > > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
                  > > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
                  > > us all to hurry it up."
                  > > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
                  > > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was enough"
                  > > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see pictures
                  of
                  > > her."
                  > > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once saw
                  > Marie
                  > > Antoinette."
                  > > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty blonde
                  I
                  > saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
                  > > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me a
                  > gold
                  > > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
                  > > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
                  > coach,
                  > > and it's THE KING!"
                  > >
                  > > Sauce protests –
                  > > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two children,
                  > with
                  > > governess and servant.
                  > >
                  > > Drouet insists -
                  > > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the
                  Queen
                  > > and their children."
                  > > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would be
                  > > guilty of crime. »
                  > > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
                  > >
                  > > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to wait
                  > > until tomorrow.
                  > >
                  > > It's half past Eleven PM,
                  > >
                  > > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the
                  berline
                  > > protest. They try to force their way out of the village. National
                  > > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
                  > >
                  > > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend the
                  > night)
                  > > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
                  > >
                  > > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted to
                  > > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers (spectators,
                  > > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious onlookers)
                  > may
                  > > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
                  > >
                  > > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the Sauce
                  > > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise (the
                  wears
                  > > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death (dog
                  > tired)
                  > > are put up in a bed.
                  > >
                  > > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like to
                  > open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
                  > >
                  > > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must she
                  be
                  > thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
                  > > her?
                  > >
                  > > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a palace.
                  > Will
                  > > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room
                  house –
                  >
                  > > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
                  > peasant
                  > > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it? How
                  > revolting!
                  > >
                  > > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
                  > welcome.
                  > > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
                  > disguised
                  > > King.
                  > >
                  > > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They are
                  > > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
                  > dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic and
                  he
                  > finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
                  > >
                  > > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational. He
                  > > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
                  > insistance,
                  > > with such an arrogance.
                  > >
                  > > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but how
                  > > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before her,
                  > and
                  > > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
                  > > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
                  > unbearable.
                  > >
                  > > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help but
                  be
                  > > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
                  > > interfering. She tells them all:
                  > >
                  > > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
                  > >
                  > > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of what
                  the
                  > > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
                  > briefly
                  > > into the candle light both men again study her.
                  > >
                  > > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-featured
                  > woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady quite
                  well
                  > born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men obey
                  > her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect the
                  > scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the pungent
                  > odors of the grocer's shop.
                  > >
                  > > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two
                  servants
                  > arouse are still not enough.
                  > >
                  > > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce interjects. He
                  > has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
                  > Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the King
                  a
                  > lot of times.
                  > >
                  > > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the
                  cramped
                  > hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant,
                  Destez
                  > not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over. He
                  bows
                  > > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
                  > >
                  > > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  ************ ********* ********* ********* ********* ********* ********* ***
                  > > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the
                  chapter «
                  > > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere Marie-
                  > > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some
                  editing
                  > > of Pimprenelle' s translation from the French and some further «
                  > > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
                  > installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I and
                  > II and then post part III together to give the whole short story of
                  > the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours which
                  must
                  > have seemed a lifetime to them.
                  > >
                  > > In this revised version, I added some background for those less
                  > familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
                  > Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
                  > mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past read
                  > accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he had
                  > seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not
                  enitrely
                  > alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the prefumer
                  > of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her famous
                  > fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume, and
                  that
                  > she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These articles
                  > speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a links to
                  > an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
                  > Queen" -
                  >
                  http://www.theglobe andmail.com/ servlet/ArticleN ews/TPStory/ LAC/2005052
                  > 1/PERFUME21/ TPTravel/
                  > >
                  > > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are welcome.
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------ --------- --------- ---
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                • jegerjanne
                  I can t believe they were so stupid as to travel with such a big and glorious berline. Why on earth would they do such a thing? What were they thinking? They
                  Message 8 of 19 , Aug 14, 2007
                    I can't believe they were so stupid as to travel with such a big and
                    glorious berline. Why on earth would they do such a thing? What were
                    they thinking?
                    They should have been dressed in normal clothes, going without
                    servants, and droven a small, open carriage. Nothing fancy at all, but
                    they would at least have been alive.

                    At the very least, they should have kept Fersen, or hidden in the
                    woods for some weeks.

                    Janne.
                  • jimmy
                    When you have been raised as an Imperial Hapsburg, and then become Queen of the most advanced civilization in Europe if not the world, France, the very idea
                    Message 9 of 19 , Aug 15, 2007
                      When you have been raised as an Imperial Hapsburg, and then become Queen of the most "advanced" civilization in Europe if not the world, France, the very idea of you slinking across the frontier disguised as ordinary mortals would be unthinkable to their class. Outside the royal enclosure at Versailles and then the Tuileries, the dangerous and violent mindset prepared to destroy the royal couple, was, I think, not fully understood by MA, Louis, or perhaps, even Fersen.

                      The "let them eat cake" statement, though as we now know not uttered by MA, is apocryphal about them and their perceived mindset. It's only since the Russian Revolution and twentieth century horrors that we have come to truly understand the dissimulation that was required to survive.

                      Jimmy O.

                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: jegerjanne <jegerjanne@...>
                      To: Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, August 14, 2007 10:43:54 AM
                      Subject: Coach, Fancy dress, Fersen - So many Varennes mistakes!

                      I can't believe they were so stupid as to travel with such a big and
                      glorious berline. Why on earth would they do such a thing? What were
                      they thinking?
                      They should have been dressed in normal clothes, going without
                      servants, and droven a small, open carriage. Nothing fancy at all, but
                      they would at least have been alive.

                      At the very least, they should have kept Fersen, or hidden in the
                      woods for some weeks.

                      Janne.


                    • Astroboy xxx
                      I always thought that two simple/shabby carriages- the first with the children, Queen and the Madame Elizabeth, and the second containing the king should have
                      Message 10 of 19 , Aug 16, 2007

                        I always thought that two simple/shabby carriages- the first with the children, Queen and the Madame Elizabeth, and the second containing the king should have been their mode of transportation. 

                         

                        The "fantastic" Berlin should have been sent on ahead meeting them at the last town before crossing the frontier.  This way the king and queen could have made their grand entrance into Hapsburg domains as befited their status.

                         

                        The two carriages could have taken different routes. 

                         

                        Two carriages would have had a better chance of escaping than just one. 

                         

                        Unfortunately, MA didn't want her family to be separated from the onset.  Even though we can admire the heart of a wife and mother it was very short sighted of her.  I can only imagine the mental torment her 20/20 hindsight must have given her.  If only we had done this... If only we had done that...  

                         

                        Also, the army shouldn't have waited for them to arrive they should have went on to meet them (in the reverse of the route the Berlin was taking) so that if they needed protection (as they did) they would have had them at their disposal.  As it was, when the Berlin met the army it was too late- they were separated by the mob...

                         

                         
                        On 8/14/07, jegerjanne <jegerjanne@...> wrote:

                        I can't believe they were so stupid as to travel with such a big and
                        glorious berline. Why on earth would they do such a thing? What were
                        they thinking?
                        They should have been dressed in normal clothes, going without
                        servants, and droven a small, open carriage. Nothing fancy at all, but
                        they would at least have been alive.

                        At the very least, they should have kept Fersen, or hidden in the
                        woods for some weeks.

                        Janne.


                      • Astroboy xxx
                        The fact of the matter is that they were recognized regardless of what they traveled in or not. It had nothing to do with the Queens acting ability. Albeit
                        Message 11 of 19 , Aug 16, 2007
                          The fact of the matter is that they were "recognized" regardless of what they traveled in or not.  It had nothing to do with the Queens acting ability.  Albeit the Berlin was extravagant- the Berlin could have contained anybody.

                           
                          On 8/9/07, Barbara <eastcountygrl@...> wrote:

                          While Marie might not have been a good actress, another reason and perhaps the main reason Marie and Louis' carriage was stopped was because it was a large and fancy carriage loaded with suitcases, etc. on top.  These were the days when you wanted to disguise the fact that you were rich, not flaunt it as did Marie and Louis - as such, they drew suspicion upon themselves before Marie ever had a chance to try out her acting skills.

                          janet fauble <janetcfauble@yahoo.com> wrote:

                          Yes, Axel, I really liked Patricia's writing style too, and thank you for letting her put it on the board. I admire her courage for feeling so free and confident to write like that. Jan

                          Axel < Rand103242@...> wrote:
                          Her husband the king wanted to be a locksmith. Beautiful Marie
                          Antoinette loved acting, playing commoners, but flopped the role of
                          her life.

                          In the flight to Varennes or as some call it the flight to Montmedy
                          but stopped at Varennes, King Louis and Queen Marie Antoinette donned
                          disguises and were to play assigned roles. Yet they were discovered
                          and I would suggest this was in part the result of the Queen's
                          failure as an actress.

                          In the 1st of 8 segments of the narrative of Varennes - "The Queen
                          and the grocer's wife" (3 segments) and "The Queen's White Hair" (5
                          segments), Lady of Healinh Touch (Patricia) comments on this first
                          segment on the long ride, the mistakes made, bitter dissapointment
                          and the discovery of King and Queen at Varennes.

                          I really like Patricia's discussion - almost putting herself in the
                          Queen's royal shoes. As I read Patricia's fine post I could feel the
                          intense summer heat, feel myself dirty with dust. I can imagine
                          Queen Marie Antoinette as she sweats and perspires in her royal
                          clothes - unable to change, cramped in the coach with the fussing
                          tired children, without the governess at hand, and the day - the
                          never ending day - it was June 20 the summer solstace - the sun did
                          not set til past 9pm!

                          I hope others will put themselves in the role as Patricia did and
                          comment more if you can.
                          Here is a link to the original the Patricia commented on
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060
                          and her comments are below.

                          I hope Patricia will do it again with the next installment - "The
                          Queen and the grocer's wife - II"
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5065

                          My comment on what Patricia said is how Marie Antoinette failed to
                          play her part. She of all of them had at least some experience in
                          play acting - Rosina in the Barber of Seville and other roles at the
                          Trianon theatre.

                          Yet, here is the role of her life - to save the life of herself and
                          her family, she needs to play a servant - not the sprightly barmaid
                          who catches men's attention, the love interest of the Beaumarchais
                          play as she is used to ...but a different role a real servant,
                          humble, subservient and unobtrusive - non-glamourous!!

                          For the Queen, this proved a real acting challenge and it seems too
                          much out of character. Patricia points out how she spoke up ...how
                          she did so in aristocratic tones... but even more than that, true she
                          did not open her necessaire but was she wearing sillage perfume?
                          She had ordered special clothes for the journey - did that include
                          her governess costume? No hand-me downs for the queen and perhaps a
                          governess costume with a bit of pinache and fashion taste to flatter
                          her figure? hmmmm ... I wonder...

                          I suggest that failure of the Queen to play her assigned role (and to
                          help Louis better play his role) as the roles should have been played
                          were important contibutions to their capture at Varennes in June 1791.

                          Hope others too will comment on Patricia's fine piece or on the
                          original
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Images_of_Marie_Antoinette/message/5060

                          Axel

                          --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, janet fauble
                          <janetcfauble@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Wow! This is just beautiful! I am so impressed. You nailed it!
                          You really reached me. Just love this post. Thanks so much...Jan
                          >
                          > ladyofhealingtouch <MadameAntoine@...> wrote: In re-
                          reading this post, I could not help but put myself in Marie
                          > Antoinette's place and imagine what she must have been feeling.
                          > I can imagine how exhausted they all were, after riding such long
                          > hours in the berline, all dusty and sweaty and Antoinette is
                          feeling
                          > discouraged. Everything had started out so well with their escape.
                          > She regrets that Louis dismissed Count Axel, as he was the one who
                          > did all the planning and he could have been there to assist Louis
                          in
                          > the decision making. Count Axel Ferson, being an experienced, well-
                          > trained soldier was skilled in such things. However, even though
                          > Antoinette believes Fersen should never have been dismissed, she
                          > supports Louis in his decision, for he is King and she, as his wife
                          > must support his decisions, even if she differs with them.
                          >
                          > She thinks back on the mistakes that have been made. They brought
                          > far too much baggage, too many people and they should never have
                          > ridden in this large berline...as it attracted far too much
                          attention
                          > where ever they had traveled. In spite of her feelings of
                          > discouragement and apprehension, she put on a brave face for the
                          > others. It would not do for her to appear weak now...not when there
                          > was still the possibility of escape.
                          >
                          > As they sit in the berline in front of Sauce and be begins
                          > questioning them, she feels her irritation growing at the length of
                          > the delay. Oh WHY won't he let them go on!! And she blurts
                          > out, "Hurry up!! We are in a hurry to arrive!! She is completely
                          > unaware of the dignity and command in her voice. Had she realized,
                          > she would surely have toned her voice down a bit and tried to sound
                          > more humble and subservient as a governess would. As it is, Sauce
                          is
                          > now eyeing her sharply, as if he can see right through her
                          > disguise...for surely no governess would have such an aristocratic
                          > voice with such a commanding tone!
                          >
                          > Antoinette grows even more discouraged as they are told that it is
                          > now too late to countersign passports and they are to be put up for
                          > the night in the Sauce household. Everything seems to be falling
                          > apart. The children are completely worn out and ready to drop and
                          > they are put to bed.
                          > As she sits in the dark corner of the room, she lets her veil down
                          > and the full impact of what is going on hits her. The plans..Axel's
                          > wonderful plans to help them escape!! They could have been far away
                          > now and safe, if not for the ridiculous delays. It was all falling
                          > apart. She wanted to put her head down in her hands and weep! A
                          lone
                          > tear trickled from her beautiful, but weary blue-grey eyes. She
                          > lightly dabbed at it so as to not draw attention. She would have
                          > preferred to be far away from here, across the border but is
                          grateful
                          > for a place to rest. She knows that she must look a fright, all
                          dusty
                          > and sweaty..but she doesn't care!! What difference does the way one
                          > looks matter when in a situation such as this!! Still, the thought
                          of
                          > a warm bath lingers in her mind for a while.
                          >
                          > At this minute, she can hear the men interrogating Louis and the
                          > insolence in their voices is grating on her nerves. Weariness is
                          > taking it's toll and suddenly she loses her temper. My God!! I can
                          > take no more!! She has reached the "end of her rope" and can no
                          > longer remain silent as she listens to their arrogant tones towards
                          > her husband, the King! She knows she should remain silent..but she
                          > can hold it back no longer as she tells them in a tone that begs
                          > command, "If you recognize him as your King, respect him!!" The
                          words
                          > are out of her mouth before she can call them back. Oh my God!!
                          What
                          > have I done! She regrets them instantly and can see the damage that
                          > was done, as the men are now looking at her with renewed suspicion.
                          > She thinks, "I have surely ruined everything!! I've as good as
                          > admitted who we are!!
                          >
                          > Sauce calls Destez, the judge who has been to Paris and knows
                          Louis.
                          > As he comes in, Destez immediately recognizes Louis and bends over
                          > and bows, "Bonjour, Sire."
                          > Antoinette's heart sinks. Why oh why did Destez have to not only
                          > recognize but bow to Louis!! All is lost. All is lost!!
                          >
                          > These are just some of my thoughts as to what might have been going
                          > on in Antoinette's mind as she experienced this tiring and
                          > discouraging journey, that should have been a successful escape,
                          > but instead it all fell apart in front of her very eyes.
                          > blessings to all,
                          > LadyofHealingTouch
                          > (Patricia) "Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com , "Axel"
                          > <Rand103242@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Varennes, June 21th, 1791. Ten forty five PM.
                          > >
                          > > The King and Queen get out of the berline (their large
                          ostentatious
                          > > coach). They find only night, silence, and a house with an empty
                          > > stable.
                          > >
                          > > Louis-Auguste knocks on the door. He asks "If they're not here,
                          > where
                          > > are the horses ?"
                          > > The answer from the man awakened inside is rude and not
                          > > encouraging, "Hit the road, Jack!".
                          > >
                          > > Postilions (the coach riders) refuse, to go on without changing
                          > > horses. They refuse even when offered bonuses of fifty louis !
                          > > (equivalent to $1,000 in today's US currency) They will only
                          agree
                          > to
                          > > get the berline to the Grand Monarque hotel (at the village
                          > center),
                          > > where relay horses may be found.
                          > >
                          > > The travellers are weary. It has been an amazing 24 hours !
                          > >
                          > > Just last night they were in Paris, at the Tuileries palace.
                          Under
                          > > the control of the same Revolution that forced the king and queen
                          > to
                          > > leave their palace at Versailles two years before. As new laws
                          > have
                          > > changed society, they have chafed at the curbing of their royal
                          > > powers. Then last night, King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette,
                          > > their children and governess, the king's sister and two servants
                          > > escaped from Tuileries into Count Fersen's waiting coaches.
                          > >
                          > > The royal family at last feels itself FREE. Louis-Auguste
                          delights
                          > the travelers as he reads from the letter he left behind denouncing
                          > all that had been forced upon him. There is a new sense of
                          > confidence. Concerned with appearances, of a foreginer leading the
                          > escape, the King has discharged Fersen and all bid him an
                          > affectionate fairwell, with deep appreciation for all he has doen
                          to
                          > make the escape a success. In the long afternoon, the the family
                          took
                          > several breaks to stetch their legs, and chat with locals. But now
                          > the longest day of the year, the summer solstice has at last turned
                          > to night. The royal family has traveled 200 miles from Paris. By
                          now
                          > and frankly for the last several hours, they have expected to be
                          met
                          > by the escort of General Bouille's loyal soldiers.
                          > >
                          > > The frontier and safety in the Austrian Netherlands (Belguim) is
                          > > near, but all are growing nervous at not having their expected
                          > escort. Each time a change of horses is needed it always seems to
                          > take so long. The large berline coach is heavily laden with bagage
                          > and requires 6 horses. And now, yet another change of horses !
                          > >
                          > > The King and Queen want the postilions to continue but agree to
                          the
                          > > detour to the town or village center. Hopefully, with a change of
                          > > horses there, the escort will soon be found.
                          > >
                          > > For a short time there are again hopes. Surely, the escort is
                          > near.
                          > >
                          > > But soon shouts resound as they enter the village center "Stop,
                          > > stop !" The shouts are adressed to Ms de Neuville and Ms Brunier,
                          > the
                          > > two servants of the Queen couched in their cabriolet (the small
                          > coach
                          > > that accompanies the berline)
                          > > - « Passports? »
                          > > The frightened ladies reply. - « They're in the second coach. »
                          > >
                          > > The man who asked, and who now comes over to the berline is
                          Sauce,
                          > > the procurator-grocer (esentially the village mayor and with his
                          > > small grocery, one of the village's few merchants)..
                          > > - « Where are you going to? »
                          > > - « To Frankfurt. » comes the reply in a woman's voice.
                          > >
                          > > Sauce notices the travellers are on a wrong route (going the
                          wrong
                          > > way). He looks into the coach and asks for their passports.
                          > >
                          > > - « Hurry up! We are in a hurry to arrive! »
                          > > It is the voice of Marie-Antoinette.
                          > >
                          > > She gathers then gives over the documents to Sauce. The Queen is
                          > in
                          > > disguise, dressed as a lowly governess, yet her voice and
                          demeanor
                          > remain commanding and aristocratic.
                          > > All while the woman dressed as the aristocrat, Baroness de Korff
                          > (in
                          > > reality the children's real governess Madame de Touzel) is silent.
                          > >
                          > > Sauce is surprised that this governess who gave the documents
                          > speaks
                          > > down to him like as if she was an aristocrat. And why does she
                          > wears
                          > > a veil? She's a stout middle-aged woman, and despite the
                          > > veil, Sauce saw she was fair and attractive. and something more,
                          he
                          > detected the scent of perfume. Hmmm.
                          > >
                          > > Sauce is in no hurry. These travelers will have to wait.
                          > >
                          > > Sauce, surrounded by two armed national guards, knows he has
                          > strength
                          > > and right on his side. He examines the papers, and finds that
                          they
                          > > are in order.
                          > >
                          > > Sauce relays his observation – the passports are in order. He is
                          > > inclinded to let them proceed, so all can get back to bed. Sauce
                          > > wants no trouble.
                          > >
                          > > But Drouet has ridden hard through many miles since the coach
                          > stopped
                          > > at his station back in Sainte-Menehould. He is waiting to
                          > > intercept these special travelers, as Sauce reports to him all is
                          > in
                          > > order at the Bras d'Or (the Gold Arms tavern).
                          > >
                          > > But Drouet is not put off.
                          > >
                          > > "Who gave you those papers?"
                          > > "Was it the woman servant?"
                          > > "What was she like?"
                          > >
                          > > Sauce shuffles and nods.
                          > > "Yes, the governess.
                          > > "Well-built woman, and a bit surprising, I admit."
                          > >
                          > > Drouet smiles.
                          > > "Yes, well built and well-fed. Top heavy – blonde."
                          > > "Spoke like an aristo too – didn't she?"
                          > > "I heard her issuing orders, at my post-station, telling
                          > > us all to hurry it up."
                          > > "Like we had nothing to do but attend to her needs!"
                          > > "I only got a brief look at her in the coach, but it was enough"
                          > > "You know I've seen pictures of her. In Paris, you see pictures
                          of
                          > > her."
                          > > "And when I was in the army years ago at Versailles, I once saw
                          > Marie
                          > > Antoinette."
                          > > "You don't forget a women like that. I tell you that busty blonde
                          I
                          > saw in the coach is THE QUEEN!"
                          > > "As they left Sainte-Menehould, the fat man servant tipped me a
                          > gold
                          > > louis d'or (equivalent to $20 US) – who tips like that?
                          > > "When I compared the coin's face with the fat servant in the
                          > coach,
                          > > and it's THE KING!"
                          > >
                          > > Sauce protests –
                          > > "But the papers are in order. Madame de Kauff and two children,
                          > with
                          > > governess and servant.
                          > >
                          > > Drouet insists -
                          > > - « I'm sure this coach you've stopped contains the King, the
                          Queen
                          > > and their children."
                          > > - « Should you let them escape to foreign country, you would be
                          > > guilty of crime. »
                          > > - « You would be guilty of treason. »
                          > >
                          > > The procurator-grocer trembles. He decides to temporize, to wait
                          > > until tomorrow.
                          > >
                          > > It's half past Eleven PM,
                          > >
                          > > It's now too late for countersigning passports. Those in the
                          berline
                          > > protest. They try to force their way out of the village. National
                          > > guards brandish their weapons. They seem ready to shoot…
                          > >
                          > > The berline must be abandoned, a place of refuge (to spend the
                          > night)
                          > > has to be found. It can be found at Sauce's house, very close.
                          > >
                          > > Silence has given way to tocsin, to the cry of "Fire" shouted to
                          > > alert people, and to exclamations of coming gawkers (spectators,
                          > > curious onlookers). Those gawkers (spectators, curious onlookers)
                          > may
                          > > become, at any moment, raving madmen.
                          > >
                          > > Marie-Antoinette and her family retire on first floor of the Sauce
                          > > house, in a room with a bed, a few chairs and merchandise (the
                          wears
                          > > of the provincial produce store). Children tired to death (dog
                          > tired)
                          > > are put up in a bed.
                          > >
                          > > She lets her veil down. She arranges her hair. She would like to
                          > open her neccessaire, her cosmetics case but does not dare.
                          > >
                          > > The Queen sits alone in a dark corner of the room. What must she
                          be
                          > thinking alone in the dark? How could this be happening to
                          > > her?
                          > >
                          > > The Queen has never in her life slept anywhere but in a palace.
                          > Will
                          > > she really have to spend the night in this rough hewn 3 room
                          house –
                          >
                          > > the Queen, the children, all cramped amid merchandise in this
                          > peasant
                          > > hovel? So rustic, smelly, pedestrian. Who would believe it? How
                          > revolting!
                          > >
                          > > She is tired. She is depressed. Sleep even here would be
                          > welcome.
                          > > But the night is not over for the disguised Queen, nor for
                          > disguised
                          > > King.
                          > >
                          > > The Queen's husband is still facing Sauce and Drouet. They are
                          > > pressing him to acknowledge he is the King of France. He is
                          > dressed as a humble servant, but his voice too is aristocratic and
                          he
                          > finds keeping to his disguised role difficult.
                          > >
                          > > Drouet in particular will not let up. He is confrontational. He
                          > > speaks – even shouts at the tired traveler , with such an
                          > insistance,
                          > > with such an arrogance.
                          > >
                          > > She wants to go to sleep. She want to stay in her corner, but how
                          > > can she. The house is so small. The drama plays out before her,
                          > and
                          > > it is so hard for her to take. How can these peasants talk my
                          > > husdand that way? How dare they? Their insolence is just
                          > unbearable.
                          > >
                          > > Marie-Antoinette as she listens, as she watches, cannot help but
                          be
                          > > angry. She cannot keep silent. She cannot keep herself from
                          > > interfering. She tells them all:
                          > >
                          > > "If you recognize him as your King, respect him (as a king)".
                          > >
                          > > The Queen's words are -nearly- an avowal (an admission of what
                          the
                          > > King has tried so hard to deny). As she utters them, coming
                          > briefly
                          > > into the candle light both men again study her.
                          > >
                          > > There is renewed recognition that this well-fed heavy-featured
                          > woman, despite her costume, has an air about her of a lady quite
                          well
                          > born. She speaks in a manner used to command and having men obey
                          > her. Her skin is so clear and with her approach both men detect the
                          > scent of jasmin, iris or perhaps roses, in contrast to the pungent
                          > odors of the grocer's shop.
                          > >
                          > > The woman's almost confession and the suspicions these two
                          servants
                          > arouse are still not enough.
                          > >
                          > > Before Drouet can say another word in reply, Sauce interjects. He
                          > has an idea to settle this. Sauce remembers there's a judge in
                          > Varennes, Destez, who, during a journey to Paris, has seen the King
                          a
                          > lot of times.
                          > >
                          > > Sauce called for Destez. He is awakened and brought to the
                          cramped
                          > hous of Sauce. As he approaches the man dressed as a servant,
                          Destez
                          > not only recognizes hime to be the King, but also bends over. He
                          bows
                          > > to Louis-Auguste, and greets him:
                          > >
                          > > "Bonjour (good evening?) Sire".
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          *********************************************************************
                          > > This post is based on a translation by Pimprenelle of the
                          chapter «
                          > > The Queen and the grocer's wife » from the biography Chere Marie-
                          > > Antoinette (Dear Marie Antoinette) by Jean Chalon, with some
                          editing
                          > > of Pimprenelle's translation from the French and some further «
                          > > dramatic flourishs » by moderator Axel. This is a re-post of
                          > installment 1, with the intention of re-posting revised parts I and
                          > II and then post part III together to give the whole short story of
                          > the royal couple and their 10 hours at Varennes - 10 hours which
                          must
                          > have seemed a lifetime to them.
                          > >
                          > > In this revised version, I added some background for those less
                          > familiar. I have also added a bit more to the role of Marie
                          > Antoinette. Jean Chalon puts the words Hurry Up in the Queen's
                          > mouth - almost all the rest I have added. I have in the past read
                          > accounts that Drouet did indeed recognize MA first and that he had
                          > seen her and seen her picture - so in this rendtion I am not
                          enitrely
                          > alone. I have not read the recent book by De Feydeau - the prefumer
                          > of Marie Antoinette, but did read some articles about her famous
                          > fragrance "Le Sillage de Reine" and her interest in perfume, and
                          that
                          > she stocked up with Houbigant before her departure. These articles
                          > speculate on the role of perfume in her capture. Here is a links to
                          > an article on the Queen and her perfume "The Scent of a Doomed
                          > Queen" -
                          >
                          http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/2005052
                          > 1/PERFUME21/TPTravel/
                          > >
                          > > Once again. Comments on all three posts to this story are welcome.
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ---------------------------------
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