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The last years and muder of Princesse de Lamballe

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  • axel
    In 1791, Marie Antoinette s close friend, the Pricness de Lamballe was allowed to go to Great Britain where she tried to gain support for the beleaguered Royal
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 2, 2013
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      In 1791, Marie Antoinette's close friend, the Pricness de Lamballe was allowed to go to Great Britain where she tried to gain support for the beleaguered Royal family.

      Like Madame Du Barry, she too no doubt was advised to remain put, but she was determined not to desert Marie Antoinette and so came back to France. Princess de Lamballe remained with Marie Antoinette until the events of 10 August 1792, when the Revolutionary mob attacked the Tuileries Palace and massacred the 900 Swiss Guards. The Royal Family, which escaped in the nick of time, was now carted off to imprisonment at the Temple Fortress in Paris.

      After being incarcerated with the Royal Family at the Temple, on 19 August 1792, the Princess de Lamballe and the Marquise de Tourzel, governess to the royal children, were separated from the Royal family and transferred to La Force prison in Paris.

      On 3 September 1792, she was brought before a hastily assembled tribunal, who demanded she swear an oath of perpetual hatred against the French monarchy. She was asked to embrace the Revolution and its principles and denounce the Monarchy. While she agreed to take an oath supporting the former, she firmly refused to turn against her beloved Queen. With this refusal, she signed her own death warrant. Confronted by an improvised court on trumped up charges which she denied, she was then asked to swear an oath of loyalty to Liberty and Equality and one of hatred to the King, Queen and Monarchy, she accepted the first but refused it later.

      A door was opened off the interrogation room, where the Princess saw men waiting with axes and pikes.

      Pushed into an alley she was hacked to death in minutes. Just because she was the Queen's friend, because of jealousy and blind rage.

      Her clothes were stripped from her body, some accounts attest to the crowd cutting off her breasts and mutilating her genitals. Her head was cut off, stuck on a pike and then carried away to a nearby café where it was laid down in front of the customers, who were asked to drink in celebration of her death. Her head was then replaced upon the pike and carried in triumph through Paris to be shown to the Queen.

      Pareded beneath Marie Antoinette's prison window at the Temple, those who were carrying the head of the Princess de Lamballe wished the Queen to kiss the lips of her favourite, as it was a frequent rumor that the two had been lovers. The head was not allowed to be brought into the building, but the Queen's guards did force her to look out of the window at the sight. The valet peered through the blinds to see the Princess's blonde curls bobbing in the air. According to her daughter, Marie Thérèse Charlotte (19 December 1778 – 19 October 1851) the Queen was "frozen with horror," and she then collapsed to the ground in a dead faint.

      Eyewitness accounts of this event were given by the Comte de Beaujolais and wax-modeler Marie Tussaud, who was forced to make the death-mask of the Princess. While her head was displayed on a pike, her body was brought to the authorities shortly after her death. It was claimed that her body was displayed on the street for a full day. Marie-Thérèse Louise de Savoie-Carignan, Princesse de Lamballe was murdered by the mob at the age of 42, on 3 September 1792, in Paris, France. Her father in law, the Duke of Penthièvre finally succeeded in retrieving her corpse. She was buried in the Penthrièvre family crypt, in the Cathedral at Dreux.

      According to the Memoirs of Madame Vigée Le Brun by Marie-Élisabeth-Louise Vigée-Le Brun,

      "…I also painted the Princess de Lamballe. Without being actually pretty, she appeared so at a little distance; she had small features, complexion of dazzling freshness, superb blond locks, and was generally elegant in person. The unhappy end of this unfortunate Princess is sufficently well known, and so is the devotion to which she fell a victim. For in 1793, when she was at Turin, entirely out of harm's way, she returned to France upon learning that the Queen was in danger."

      Her character was of the admirable few. What was in her honour was her strength to resist evil, her loyalty to her last breath.

      Sources: Madame de Lamballe by Georges Bertin, The Memoirs of Marie Antoinette by Madame Campan and the Memoirs of Madame Vigée Le Brun by Marie-Élisabeth-Louise Vigée-Le Brun

      * * *

      The above account is part of the life story of the Princess de Lamballe that appears at the website - http://theloveforhistory.com/people/madame-de-lamballe/

      It is posted today, September 2, one day before the anniversary of the death of the Princesse de Lamballe in the September Massacres on Spetember 3, 1792.
    • axel
      The murder of Princess de Lamballe points again to the widespread belief that Marie Antoinette enjoyed lesbian relationships. The brutal murder of the
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 2, 2013
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        The murder of Princess de Lamballe points again to the widespread belief that Marie Antoinette enjoyed lesbian relationships. The brutal murder of the Princess including cutting off her breasts and genetals and then parading her head before the Queen's windows asking the Queen to kiss again the lips of her lover was a demonstration of how such a perceived relationship aroused such hatred in the homophobic France of 1792.

        Axel

        --- In Images_of_Marie_Antoinette@yahoogroups.com, "axel" <Rand103242@...> wrote:
        >
        > In 1791, Marie Antoinette's close friend, the Pricness de Lamballe was allowed to go to Great Britain where she tried to gain support for the beleaguered Royal family.
        >
        > Like Madame Du Barry, she too no doubt was advised to remain put, but she was determined not to desert Marie Antoinette and so came back to France. Princess de Lamballe remained with Marie Antoinette until the events of 10 August 1792, when the Revolutionary mob attacked the Tuileries Palace and massacred the 900 Swiss Guards. The Royal Family, which escaped in the nick of time, was now carted off to imprisonment at the Temple Fortress in Paris.
        >
        > After being incarcerated with the Royal Family at the Temple, on 19 August 1792, the Princess de Lamballe and the Marquise de Tourzel, governess to the royal children, were separated from the Royal family and transferred to La Force prison in Paris.
        >
        > On 3 September 1792, she was brought before a hastily assembled tribunal, who demanded she swear an oath of perpetual hatred against the French monarchy. She was asked to embrace the Revolution and its principles and denounce the Monarchy. While she agreed to take an oath supporting the former, she firmly refused to turn against her beloved Queen. With this refusal, she signed her own death warrant. Confronted by an improvised court on trumped up charges which she denied, she was then asked to swear an oath of loyalty to Liberty and Equality and one of hatred to the King, Queen and Monarchy, she accepted the first but refused it later.
        >
        > A door was opened off the interrogation room, where the Princess saw men waiting with axes and pikes.
        >
        > Pushed into an alley she was hacked to death in minutes. Just because she was the Queen's friend, because of jealousy and blind rage.
        >
        > Her clothes were stripped from her body, some accounts attest to the crowd cutting off her breasts and mutilating her genitals. Her head was cut off, stuck on a pike and then carried away to a nearby café where it was laid down in front of the customers, who were asked to drink in celebration of her death. Her head was then replaced upon the pike and carried in triumph through Paris to be shown to the Queen.
        >
        > Pareded beneath Marie Antoinette's prison window at the Temple, those who were carrying the head of the Princess de Lamballe wished the Queen to kiss the lips of her favourite, as it was a frequent rumor that the two had been lovers. The head was not allowed to be brought into the building, but the Queen's guards did force her to look out of the window at the sight. The valet peered through the blinds to see the Princess's blonde curls bobbing in the air. According to her daughter, Marie Thérèse Charlotte (19 December 1778 – 19 October 1851) the Queen was "frozen with horror," and she then collapsed to the ground in a dead faint.
        >
        > Eyewitness accounts of this event were given by the Comte de Beaujolais and wax-modeler Marie Tussaud, who was forced to make the death-mask of the Princess. While her head was displayed on a pike, her body was brought to the authorities shortly after her death. It was claimed that her body was displayed on the street for a full day. Marie-Thérèse Louise de Savoie-Carignan, Princesse de Lamballe was murdered by the mob at the age of 42, on 3 September 1792, in Paris, France. Her father in law, the Duke of Penthièvre finally succeeded in retrieving her corpse. She was buried in the Penthrièvre family crypt, in the Cathedral at Dreux.
        >
        > According to the Memoirs of Madame Vigée Le Brun by Marie-Élisabeth-Louise Vigée-Le Brun,
        >
        > "…I also painted the Princess de Lamballe. Without being actually pretty, she appeared so at a little distance; she had small features, complexion of dazzling freshness, superb blond locks, and was generally elegant in person. The unhappy end of this unfortunate Princess is sufficently well known, and so is the devotion to which she fell a victim. For in 1793, when she was at Turin, entirely out of harm's way, she returned to France upon learning that the Queen was in danger."
        >
        > Her character was of the admirable few. What was in her honour was her strength to resist evil, her loyalty to her last breath.
        >
        > Sources: Madame de Lamballe by Georges Bertin, The Memoirs of Marie Antoinette by Madame Campan and the Memoirs of Madame Vigée Le Brun by Marie-Élisabeth-Louise Vigée-Le Brun
        >
        > * * *
        >
        > The above account is part of the life story of the Princess de Lamballe that appears at the website - http://theloveforhistory.com/people/madame-de-lamballe/
        >
        > It is posted today, September 2, one day before the anniversary of the death of the Princesse de Lamballe in the September Massacres on Spetember 3, 1792.
        >
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