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Building a DN

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  • Aaron
    I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am now gathering materials to begin construction. Do I need to build a strong back for the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 31, 2011
      I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am now gathering materials to begin construction.

      Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in the hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any plans or suggestions?

      Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?

      Thanks,
      Aaron
      future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
    • Ed Atkeson
      Hi Aaron, You ll probably get an avalanche of replies on this. I bought the Goodwin plans and built a boat. My advice is to get all the right stuff, marine
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 1, 2011
        Hi Aaron,
        You'll probably get an avalanche of replies on this. I bought the Goodwin
        plans and built a boat. My advice is to get all the right stuff, marine ply,
        sitka spruce. Yes, make a building table, level and true, roll out the
        plans, cover them with a sheet of clear poly and put the boat together. I
        built the one with the curved bottom and I like the look. But either way,
        take your time, and be ready to spend an arm and a leg on spars, sails,
        runners, hardware, etc.

        Alternately, buy a $1200. boat and go sailing this season. Cannibalize it
        for hardware when you're ready with your new boat.
        best,
        Ed



        On Sun, Jul 31, 2011 at 8:20 PM, Aaron <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am now
        > gathering materials to begin construction.
        >
        > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in the
        > hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any plans or
        > suggestions?
        >
        > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Aaron
        > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gregory Szok
        Excellent advice offered so far.   As a carpenter who s done a lot of curved work, I believe 1/4 sawn is best structurally, but glue joints (while sound)
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 1, 2011
          Excellent advice offered so far.
           
          As a carpenter who's done a lot of curved work, I believe 1/4 sawn is best structurally, but glue joints (while sound) become visible over time. A more obscure grain obscures the joints. An odd number of "plys" reduces stress on the glue. "Winding Sticks"  & "Spring Back" are good terms to know when bending wood.
           
          As an iceboater I simply allow an astounding 0.0625 wobble to one rear skate and eat the windward damage. I've read about forstner bits (for steel!) to allow epoxies to provide precise mechanical, as well as chemical, adhesion for the rear chocks, but that sounds like a NASA technique.
           
          9' of knife edge is never safe.               Wheeeeeeeeeeee!
           
           
                                         
          --- On Mon, 8/1/11, Ed Atkeson <edatkeson@...> wrote:


          From: Ed Atkeson <edatkeson@...>
          Subject: Re: [IceBoating] Building a DN
          To: IceBoating@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, August 1, 2011, 12:08 PM


           



          Hi Aaron,
          You'll probably get an avalanche of replies on this. I bought the Goodwin
          plans and built a boat. My advice is to get all the right stuff, marine ply,
          sitka spruce. Yes, make a building table, level and true, roll out the
          plans, cover them with a sheet of clear poly and put the boat together. I
          built the one with the curved bottom and I like the look. But either way,
          take your time, and be ready to spend an arm and a leg on spars, sails,
          runners, hardware, etc.

          Alternately, buy a $1200. boat and go sailing this season. Cannibalize it
          for hardware when you're ready with your new boat.
          best,
          Ed

          On Sun, Jul 31, 2011 at 8:20 PM, Aaron <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am now
          > gathering materials to begin construction.
          >
          > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in the
          > hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any plans or
          > suggestions?
          >
          > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Aaron
          > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ed Atkeson
          Aaron, about putting the curves in the side pieces, get somebody with a bandsaw to resaw the area that curves, get some veneer to fill the slot, build a jig to
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 2, 2011
            Aaron, about putting the curves in the side pieces, get somebody with a
            bandsaw to resaw the area that curves, get some veneer to fill the slot,
            build a jig to bend it around, put your gloves on and epoxy it up. The curve
            doesn't have to be exact, you can spring it a bit when you build the boat.
            good luck,

            On Sun, Jul 31, 2011 at 8:20 PM, Aaron <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am now
            > gathering materials to begin construction.
            >
            > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in the
            > hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any plans or
            > suggestions?
            >
            > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Aaron
            > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Aaron
            ... Thank you for your advice. I haven t started yet but I now have the vital wife approval . Budget and future compromise negotiations will begin. The US
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 2, 2011
              --- In IceBoating@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron" <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:
              >
              > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am now gathering materials to begin construction.
              >
              > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in the hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any plans or suggestions?
              >
              > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
              >
              > Thanks,
              > Aaron
              > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
              >

              Thank you for your advice. I haven't started yet but I now have the vital "wife approval". Budget and future compromise negotiations will begin. The US budget debates have nothing on this!

              Aaron
            • Chris Gordon
              Aron,   Someone else suggested what I am going to say but this is what I did. Find a complete beater boat for $1000,00 +/- and sail it. And fix it up. I too
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 3, 2011
                Aron,
                 
                Someone else suggested what I am going to say but this is what I did. Find a complete beater boat for $1000,00 +/- and sail it. And fix it up. I too bought the Sherry/Goowin plans. That design is state of the art. I probably would never have built it. I went to a local pond in a very windy day and there was this wreck of a boat being sailed by everyone who wanted to sail it. It was a state of the art '60's or 70's boat. Pre epoxy/Gudgeon. But it sailed. It had a green cotton storm sail and a regular sail that was Dacron of hanky weight. The boat was painted with black latex paint with carnation/pink stripes and wooden spars painted the carnation color. A large amount of the paint was peeling. Steve Lamb is reported to have bought it out of a front yard during a snow storm in Rhode Island while on his way home from a job. It is reported that it became the flagship of "The Micky Mouse Iceboat Club". There are pictures of the boat fully rigged in Steve
                Lamb's shop, fully rigged with a life sized stuffed Micky Mouse at the helm. A piece of paper with a price tag for the boat of $600.00 was stuck on the mast. I bought it as the price was being taped to the sail.
                 
                It was January and I took it home. My wife was convinced I was on another obsession and had lost my mind. I stripped it down, cleaned it up, put in a new floor and as I did so, I found that it was really a very well made boat. I learned how it went together. And I had a boat to sail. I have stories. I bondo'ed with epoxy and microballons, put 4 coats of epoxy resin, and went sailing. The resurrection of "The Tiger Boat" is still discussed today. I made it up to the Spring Frolic in 2005 or 2006.
                 
                Because I had a boat to sail, and I had repaired it, I had a better idea of how it was built and how I could build a new one.
                 
                I made a table out of a sheet of 1/2" AC plywood, cut into three 32"x48" pieces. Making a table 12' long and 32" wide. I banded the table with 2"x*" and urethaned it. It is the size of the Goodwin/Sherry plans if you bought the full size template. I copied the side plank from the template using carbon paper and production paper. I then had a paper template. I made the curved bottom. Jeff Brown gave me a CD of how he built his boat which mine is pretty much of a copy of his. A DN is a really easy boat to build. A friend asked to look at my boat. He and two other guys built three new DN's using the Goodwin templates on Nantucket last summer, 2010. They came out awesome. They are not boat builders nor are they carpenters.
                 
                Myself, I'm just an old plumber who has built a few houses and likes to play with wood.
                 
                Find an old boat and sail it. It will help you along to build a new boat. You can always ell the old boat for what you paid for it.
                 
                Chris Gordon
                Brewster, MA

                --- On Wed, 8/3/11, Aaron <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:


                From: Aaron <ds16vacuity@...>
                Subject: [IceBoating] Re: Building a DN
                To: IceBoating@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:19 AM


                 





                --- In IceBoating@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron" <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:
                >
                > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am now gathering materials to begin construction.
                >
                > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in the hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any plans or suggestions?
                >
                > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
                >
                > Thanks,
                > Aaron
                > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
                >

                Thank you for your advice. I haven't started yet but I now have the vital "wife approval". Budget and future compromise negotiations will begin. The US budget debates have nothing on this!

                Aaron








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Randall Rice
                very good advice. I like fixing things that are pretty much all there. does not matter usually how bad it is. tough to gather every morsel and build from
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 4, 2011
                  very good advice. I like fixing things that are pretty much all
                  there. does not matter usually how bad it is. tough to gather every
                  morsel and build from scratch. Starting anew is good if you know
                  where you are going if time is a factor.
                  On Aug 3, 2011, at 9:12 PM, Chris Gordon wrote:

                  > Aron,
                  >
                  > Someone else suggested what I am going to say but this is what I
                  > did. Find a complete beater boat for $1000,00 +/- and sail it. And
                  > fix it up. I too bought the Sherry/Goowin plans. That design is
                  > state of the art. I probably would never have built it. I went to a
                  > local pond in a very windy day and there was this wreck of a boat
                  > being sailed by everyone who wanted to sail it. It was a state of
                  > the art '60's or 70's boat. Pre epoxy/Gudgeon. But it sailed. It had
                  > a green cotton storm sail and a regular sail that was Dacron of
                  > hanky weight. The boat was painted with black latex paint with
                  > carnation/pink stripes and wooden spars painted the carnation color.
                  > A large amount of the paint was peeling. Steve Lamb is reported to
                  > have bought it out of a front yard during a snow storm in Rhode
                  > Island while on his way home from a job. It is reported that it
                  > became the flagship of "The Micky Mouse Iceboat Club". There are
                  > pictures of the boat fully rigged in Steve
                  > Lamb's shop, fully rigged with a life sized stuffed Micky Mouse at
                  > the helm. A piece of paper with a price tag for the boat of $600.00
                  > was stuck on the mast. I bought it as the price was being taped to
                  > the sail.
                  >
                  > It was January and I took it home. My wife was convinced I was on
                  > another obsession and had lost my mind. I stripped it down, cleaned
                  > it up, put in a new floor and as I did so, I found that it was
                  > really a very well made boat. I learned how it went together. And I
                  > had a boat to sail. I have stories. I bondo'ed with epoxy and
                  > microballons, put 4 coats of epoxy resin, and went sailing. The
                  > resurrection of "The Tiger Boat" is still discussed today. I made it
                  > up to the Spring Frolic in 2005 or 2006.
                  >
                  > Because I had a boat to sail, and I had repaired it, I had a better
                  > idea of how it was built and how I could build a new one.
                  >
                  > I made a table out of a sheet of 1/2" AC plywood, cut into three
                  > 32"x48" pieces. Making a table 12' long and 32" wide. I banded the
                  > table with 2"x*" and urethaned it. It is the size of the Goodwin/
                  > Sherry plans if you bought the full size template. I copied the side
                  > plank from the template using carbon paper and production paper. I
                  > then had a paper template. I made the curved bottom. Jeff Brown gave
                  > me a CD of how he built his boat which mine is pretty much of a copy
                  > of his. A DN is a really easy boat to build. A friend asked to look
                  > at my boat. He and two other guys built three new DN's using the
                  > Goodwin templates on Nantucket last summer, 2010. They came out
                  > awesome. They are not boat builders nor are they carpenters.
                  >
                  > Myself, I'm just an old plumber who has built a few houses and likes
                  > to play with wood.
                  >
                  > Find an old boat and sail it. It will help you along to build a new
                  > boat. You can always ell the old boat for what you paid for it.
                  >
                  > Chris Gordon
                  > Brewster, MA
                  >
                  > --- On Wed, 8/3/11, Aaron <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Aaron <ds16vacuity@...>
                  > Subject: [IceBoating] Re: Building a DN
                  > To: IceBoating@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:19 AM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In IceBoating@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron" <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am
                  > now gathering materials to begin construction.
                  > >
                  > > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in
                  > the hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any
                  > plans or suggestions?
                  > >
                  > > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
                  > >
                  > > Thanks,
                  > > Aaron
                  > > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
                  > >
                  >
                  > Thank you for your advice. I haven't started yet but I now have the
                  > vital "wife approval". Budget and future compromise negotiations
                  > will begin. The US budget debates have nothing on this!
                  >
                  > Aaron
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Tom Clarke
                  I was told by the members at my first fall NEIYA meeting to beware of painted boats as there might be some poltergeists lurking within. I ve never listened to
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 4, 2011
                    I was told by the members at my first fall NEIYA meeting to beware of
                    painted boats as there might be some poltergeists lurking within. I've
                    never listened to anyone to begin with so why should I have started
                    listening to total strangers at that time?

                    I paid the price...sort of!

                    I bought a well equiped DN for $1,500. It came with a mast/sail cover and
                    canvas covers for the mast and hull and runner plank, it wasn't missing
                    anything, ready to sail (I thought). I scored some nice runners and rigging
                    in the deal. The previous owner ran off from iceboating after one probably
                    fun filled day during which he sailed the boat without the bobstay. The
                    result was some pretty serious damage to to the hull which he covered up and
                    neglected to point out. There's a special place in the after life for guys
                    like him. I was going to shake him down for $500. but I was so friggin'
                    happy to have a DN that I was not going to let anything dampen my ecstacy.

                    Bob Baker came over and helped with the assesment of the damage, talked me
                    down from the ledge, adjusted the router and handed it to me and said "call
                    me when the bottom is stripped", what a hellacious mess!

                    Long story short, I routered the old bottom off and had my way with some
                    poplar for framing and plywood both from Boulter in Somerville, MA. I'm
                    sure there is a closer source to Calgary!

                    Once I recovered from the initial thrashing, I took on the project with joy.

                    I removed, re-cut and mounted new framing which now accomodates Steve
                    Duhamel's http://www.northwindiceboats.com/ cool deck hardware for quick
                    block location changes. I carefully drilled and pinned the cracked
                    fuselage with an array of top secret epoxy blends and other highly
                    mysterious materials and methods and came away with a pretty slick set up.
                    I'm under $2,000 for everything, helmet, safety equipment and work done by
                    Steve at his shop. Regarding your budget negotiations, that's the number I
                    have disclosed to my wife and I'm sticking with the story!

                    If you started all this fun from scratch, I think you would outpace my
                    $2,000 investment very early in the project. The other part is that once
                    you show up on the ice with your own rig you will meet some very fun and
                    interesting people. They come with all kinds of contraptions (ever see
                    someone trying to sail a "Plank"?) and you may see a more suitable boat
                    design for your area or your liking and selling a less expensive boat is a
                    lot easier.

                    Welcome to the hard water.


                    Tom Clarke
                    Plymouth, MA 02360

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Randall Rice" <sailfast1@...>
                    To: <IceBoating@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2011 8:13 AM
                    Subject: Re: [IceBoating] Re: Building a DN


                    > very good advice. I like fixing things that are pretty much all
                    > there. does not matter usually how bad it is. tough to gather every
                    > morsel and build from scratch. Starting anew is good if you know
                    > where you are going if time is a factor.
                    > On Aug 3, 2011, at 9:12 PM, Chris Gordon wrote:
                    >
                    >> Aron,
                    >>
                    >> Someone else suggested what I am going to say but this is what I
                    >> did. Find a complete beater boat for $1000,00 +/- and sail it. And
                    >> fix it up. I too bought the Sherry/Goowin plans. That design is
                    >> state of the art. I probably would never have built it. I went to a
                    >> local pond in a very windy day and there was this wreck of a boat
                    >> being sailed by everyone who wanted to sail it. It was a state of
                    >> the art '60's or 70's boat. Pre epoxy/Gudgeon. But it sailed. It had
                    >> a green cotton storm sail and a regular sail that was Dacron of
                    >> hanky weight. The boat was painted with black latex paint with
                    >> carnation/pink stripes and wooden spars painted the carnation color.
                    >> A large amount of the paint was peeling. Steve Lamb is reported to
                    >> have bought it out of a front yard during a snow storm in Rhode
                    >> Island while on his way home from a job. It is reported that it
                    >> became the flagship of "The Micky Mouse Iceboat Club". There are
                    >> pictures of the boat fully rigged in Steve
                    >> Lamb's shop, fully rigged with a life sized stuffed Micky Mouse at
                    >> the helm. A piece of paper with a price tag for the boat of $600.00
                    >> was stuck on the mast. I bought it as the price was being taped to
                    >> the sail.
                    >>
                    >> It was January and I took it home. My wife was convinced I was on
                    >> another obsession and had lost my mind. I stripped it down, cleaned
                    >> it up, put in a new floor and as I did so, I found that it was
                    >> really a very well made boat. I learned how it went together. And I
                    >> had a boat to sail. I have stories. I bondo'ed with epoxy and
                    >> microballons, put 4 coats of epoxy resin, and went sailing. The
                    >> resurrection of "The Tiger Boat" is still discussed today. I made it
                    >> up to the Spring Frolic in 2005 or 2006.
                    >>
                    >> Because I had a boat to sail, and I had repaired it, I had a better
                    >> idea of how it was built and how I could build a new one.
                    >>
                    >> I made a table out of a sheet of 1/2" AC plywood, cut into three
                    >> 32"x48" pieces. Making a table 12' long and 32" wide. I banded the
                    >> table with 2"x*" and urethaned it. It is the size of the Goodwin/
                    >> Sherry plans if you bought the full size template. I copied the side
                    >> plank from the template using carbon paper and production paper. I
                    >> then had a paper template. I made the curved bottom. Jeff Brown gave
                    >> me a CD of how he built his boat which mine is pretty much of a copy
                    >> of his. A DN is a really easy boat to build. A friend asked to look
                    >> at my boat. He and two other guys built three new DN's using the
                    >> Goodwin templates on Nantucket last summer, 2010. They came out
                    >> awesome. They are not boat builders nor are they carpenters.
                    >>
                    >> Myself, I'm just an old plumber who has built a few houses and likes
                    >> to play with wood.
                    >>
                    >> Find an old boat and sail it. It will help you along to build a new
                    >> boat. You can always ell the old boat for what you paid for it.
                    >>
                    >> Chris Gordon
                    >> Brewster, MA
                    >>
                    >> --- On Wed, 8/3/11, Aaron <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> From: Aaron <ds16vacuity@...>
                    >> Subject: [IceBoating] Re: Building a DN
                    >> To: IceBoating@yahoogroups.com
                    >> Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:19 AM
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> --- In IceBoating@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron" <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:
                    >> >
                    >> > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am
                    >> now gathering materials to begin construction.
                    >> >
                    >> > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in
                    >> the hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any
                    >> plans or suggestions?
                    >> >
                    >> > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
                    >> >
                    >> > Thanks,
                    >> > Aaron
                    >> > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
                    >> >
                    >>
                    >> Thank you for your advice. I haven't started yet but I now have the
                    >> vital "wife approval". Budget and future compromise negotiations
                    >> will begin. The US budget debates have nothing on this!
                    >>
                    >> Aaron
                    >>
                    >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Please, NEVER, NEVER SAIL ALONE - GO FAST - Stay SAFE
                    > Unsubscribe: IceBoating-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > List owner: IceBoating-owner@yahoogroups.com
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • scott
                    Pure myth. Any boat can have history -- varnish or paint.
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 21, 2011
                      Pure myth.

                      Any boat can have history -- varnish or paint.



                      --- In IceBoating@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Clarke" <herringpondtc@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I was told by the members at my first fall NEIYA meeting to beware of
                      > painted boats as there might be some poltergeists lurking within. I've
                      > never listened to anyone to begin with so why should I have started
                      > listening to total strangers at that time?
                      >
                      > I paid the price...sort of!
                      >
                      > I bought a well equiped DN for $1,500. It came with a mast/sail cover and
                      > canvas covers for the mast and hull and runner plank, it wasn't missing
                      > anything, ready to sail (I thought). I scored some nice runners and rigging
                      > in the deal. The previous owner ran off from iceboating after one probably
                      > fun filled day during which he sailed the boat without the bobstay. The
                      > result was some pretty serious damage to to the hull which he covered up and
                      > neglected to point out. There's a special place in the after life for guys
                      > like him. I was going to shake him down for $500. but I was so friggin'
                      > happy to have a DN that I was not going to let anything dampen my ecstacy.
                      >
                      > Bob Baker came over and helped with the assesment of the damage, talked me
                      > down from the ledge, adjusted the router and handed it to me and said "call
                      > me when the bottom is stripped", what a hellacious mess!
                      >
                      > Long story short, I routered the old bottom off and had my way with some
                      > poplar for framing and plywood both from Boulter in Somerville, MA. I'm
                      > sure there is a closer source to Calgary!
                      >
                      > Once I recovered from the initial thrashing, I took on the project with joy.
                      >
                      > I removed, re-cut and mounted new framing which now accomodates Steve
                      > Duhamel's http://www.northwindiceboats.com/ cool deck hardware for quick
                      > block location changes. I carefully drilled and pinned the cracked
                      > fuselage with an array of top secret epoxy blends and other highly
                      > mysterious materials and methods and came away with a pretty slick set up.
                      > I'm under $2,000 for everything, helmet, safety equipment and work done by
                      > Steve at his shop. Regarding your budget negotiations, that's the number I
                      > have disclosed to my wife and I'm sticking with the story!
                      >
                      > If you started all this fun from scratch, I think you would outpace my
                      > $2,000 investment very early in the project. The other part is that once
                      > you show up on the ice with your own rig you will meet some very fun and
                      > interesting people. They come with all kinds of contraptions (ever see
                      > someone trying to sail a "Plank"?) and you may see a more suitable boat
                      > design for your area or your liking and selling a less expensive boat is a
                      > lot easier.
                      >
                      > Welcome to the hard water.
                      >
                      >
                      > Tom Clarke
                      > Plymouth, MA 02360
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: "Randall Rice" <sailfast1@...>
                      > To: <IceBoating@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2011 8:13 AM
                      > Subject: Re: [IceBoating] Re: Building a DN
                      >
                      >
                      > > very good advice. I like fixing things that are pretty much all
                      > > there. does not matter usually how bad it is. tough to gather every
                      > > morsel and build from scratch. Starting anew is good if you know
                      > > where you are going if time is a factor.
                      > > On Aug 3, 2011, at 9:12 PM, Chris Gordon wrote:
                      > >
                      > >> Aron,
                      > >>
                      > >> Someone else suggested what I am going to say but this is what I
                      > >> did. Find a complete beater boat for $1000,00 +/- and sail it. And
                      > >> fix it up. I too bought the Sherry/Goowin plans. That design is
                      > >> state of the art. I probably would never have built it. I went to a
                      > >> local pond in a very windy day and there was this wreck of a boat
                      > >> being sailed by everyone who wanted to sail it. It was a state of
                      > >> the art '60's or 70's boat. Pre epoxy/Gudgeon. But it sailed. It had
                      > >> a green cotton storm sail and a regular sail that was Dacron of
                      > >> hanky weight. The boat was painted with black latex paint with
                      > >> carnation/pink stripes and wooden spars painted the carnation color.
                      > >> A large amount of the paint was peeling. Steve Lamb is reported to
                      > >> have bought it out of a front yard during a snow storm in Rhode
                      > >> Island while on his way home from a job. It is reported that it
                      > >> became the flagship of "The Micky Mouse Iceboat Club". There are
                      > >> pictures of the boat fully rigged in Steve
                      > >> Lamb's shop, fully rigged with a life sized stuffed Micky Mouse at
                      > >> the helm. A piece of paper with a price tag for the boat of $600.00
                      > >> was stuck on the mast. I bought it as the price was being taped to
                      > >> the sail.
                      > >>
                      > >> It was January and I took it home. My wife was convinced I was on
                      > >> another obsession and had lost my mind. I stripped it down, cleaned
                      > >> it up, put in a new floor and as I did so, I found that it was
                      > >> really a very well made boat. I learned how it went together. And I
                      > >> had a boat to sail. I have stories. I bondo'ed with epoxy and
                      > >> microballons, put 4 coats of epoxy resin, and went sailing. The
                      > >> resurrection of "The Tiger Boat" is still discussed today. I made it
                      > >> up to the Spring Frolic in 2005 or 2006.
                      > >>
                      > >> Because I had a boat to sail, and I had repaired it, I had a better
                      > >> idea of how it was built and how I could build a new one.
                      > >>
                      > >> I made a table out of a sheet of 1/2" AC plywood, cut into three
                      > >> 32"x48" pieces. Making a table 12' long and 32" wide. I banded the
                      > >> table with 2"x*" and urethaned it. It is the size of the Goodwin/
                      > >> Sherry plans if you bought the full size template. I copied the side
                      > >> plank from the template using carbon paper and production paper. I
                      > >> then had a paper template. I made the curved bottom. Jeff Brown gave
                      > >> me a CD of how he built his boat which mine is pretty much of a copy
                      > >> of his. A DN is a really easy boat to build. A friend asked to look
                      > >> at my boat. He and two other guys built three new DN's using the
                      > >> Goodwin templates on Nantucket last summer, 2010. They came out
                      > >> awesome. They are not boat builders nor are they carpenters.
                      > >>
                      > >> Myself, I'm just an old plumber who has built a few houses and likes
                      > >> to play with wood.
                      > >>
                      > >> Find an old boat and sail it. It will help you along to build a new
                      > >> boat. You can always ell the old boat for what you paid for it.
                      > >>
                      > >> Chris Gordon
                      > >> Brewster, MA
                      > >>
                      > >> --- On Wed, 8/3/11, Aaron <ds16vacuity@...> wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >> From: Aaron <ds16vacuity@...>
                      > >> Subject: [IceBoating] Re: Building a DN
                      > >> To: IceBoating@yahoogroups.com
                      > >> Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011, 12:19 AM
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >> --- In IceBoating@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron" <ds16vacuity@> wrote:
                      > >> >
                      > >> > I recently purchased plans for a Paul Goodwin DN ice boat and am
                      > >> now gathering materials to begin construction.
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Do I need to build a strong back for the fuselage and the bend in
                      > >> the hullsides? If that is the case has anyone built on before? Any
                      > >> plans or suggestions?
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Does anyone have any comments or feedback on the Goodwin plans?
                      > >> >
                      > >> > Thanks,
                      > >> > Aaron
                      > >> > future iceboater in Calgary, Alberta
                      > >> >
                      > >>
                      > >> Thank you for your advice. I haven't started yet but I now have the
                      > >> vital "wife approval". Budget and future compromise negotiations
                      > >> will begin. The US budget debates have nothing on this!
                      > >>
                      > >> Aaron
                      > >>
                      > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ------------------------------------
                      > >
                      > > Please, NEVER, NEVER SAIL ALONE - GO FAST - Stay SAFE
                      > > Unsubscribe: IceBoating-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      > > List owner: IceBoating-owner@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
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