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ESPN: Challenge to Redskins name begins

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  • ghwelker
    ESPN: Challenge to Redskins name begins Washington Redskins general manager Bruce Allen attended his first trademark hearing Thursday. He heard lawyers and
    Message 1 of 69 , Apr 3, 2013

      ESPN: Challenge to Redskins name begins

      Washington Redskins general manager Bruce Allen attended his first trademark hearing Thursday. He heard lawyers and judges fuss over dictionaries, surveys and the actions of offended 18-year-olds while using terms such as "hearsay exception" and "Chevron deference," all in a debate over the team's nickname. As the 90-minute hearing before three judges on the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board showed, the case against the team is not as simple as declaring that the word "redskins" is a slur and therefore shouldn't have federal trademark protection. The group of five Native American petitioners has to show that the name "Washington Redskins" was disparaging to a significant population of American Indians back when the team was granted the trademarks from 1967 to 1990.

      AP: Legislature could alter Native American mascot ban

      Three bills introduced in Salem attempt to weaken the state Board of Education's 2012 decision to prohibit Native American mascots. Schools with Native American mascots, nicknames and logos have just over four years to comply with the ban or risk losing their state funding. Senate Bill 215 and House Bill 3397 would let schools keep their mascots if they get the blessing of a local tribe. Senate Bill 501, meanwhile, would prohibit the state Board of Education from withholding money.

      CNN: Taking Native American fashion beyond buckskin and headdresses

      Growing up in rural North Dakota, about 13 miles from the Canadian border and a 90-minute drive from the nearest McDonald's, Jessica Metcalfe relied on magazines for her pop culture fix. The young Turtle Mountain Chippewa never saw anyone in the pages of Seventeen who looked like her. But as an adult, she's working to change that, promoting the work of Native American fashion designers and artists. She began with the 2009 launch of Beyond Buckskin, a blog that highlights Native designers and discusses their place in media and pop culture. Even Metcalfe was surprised by its initial success -- by the size of its audience, the positive feedback, the readers asking, "Where can I buy that?"

       

    • ghwelker
      http://vimeo.com/63898681 This exhibition has been co-organized by the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center. Drawing from
      Message 69 of 69 , Apr 17, 2013

        http://vimeo.com/63898681


        This exhibition has been co-organized by the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center.


        Drawing from more than 17,000 objects in the collections of the National Museum of the American Indian, Cerámica de los Ancestros is a celebration of Central America’s diverse and dynamic ancestral heritage. For thousands of years, Central America has been home to vibrant civilizations, each with unique, sophisticated ways of life, value systems, and arts. The ceramics these peoples left behind, combined with recent archaeological discoveries, help tell the stories of these dynamic cultures and their achievements.


        The early histories of Central American cultures follow similar paths. By 1500 BC, people had settled in large villages, where they cultivated, hunted, and gathered wild foods. Maize agriculture supported growing populations, and distinct forms of status, leadership, belief systems, and arts emerged regionally. Social and trade networks connected Central American communities to peoples in South America, Mesoamerica, and the Caribbean, sharing knowledge, technology, artworks, and systems of status and political organization.


        Europeans’ arrival brought further changes. Native peoples have often struggled to maintain distinct identities and lifeways, or have merged with dominant cultures. Despite these changes, the legacy of Central America’s civilizations continues to resonate in their descendants’ lives and those of other Central Americans.


        Cerámica de los Ancestros looks at seven regions representing distinct Central American cultural areas. These regions are today part of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama.


        Accompanied by an interactive website, a landmark publication, and a full schedule of educational and public programs, Cerámica de los Ancestros represents a pioneering effort by the Smithsonian to promote a better understanding of the creative pre-Contact cultures of Central America while engaging a new Latino audience.


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