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Major Ancient Hawaiian Trail Site Destroyed, Sacred Sites Bulldozed !

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  • ghwelker
    Aloha, Major Ancient Hawaiian Trail Site Destroyed, Sacred Sites Bulldozed For HCDA PV Farm http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLJ89y5RbCU Another example of very
    Message 1 of 69 , Mar 25 3:33 AM
    Aloha,

    Major Ancient Hawaiian Trail Site Destroyed, Sacred Sites Bulldozed For HCDA PV Farm

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLJ89y5RbCU

    Another example of very poor HCDA documentation of important Kanehili sacred sites which the Federal HART EIS has identified as the "Leina a ka Uhane" - a spiritual leaping off point of souls back to the Tahitian homeland. This ancient Kanehili area is documented in the Hawaiian chants of Hi'iaka going back nearly 1000 years. Near this area is the very ancient Hawaiian spring of Hoakalei. The area of Kanehili contains large numbers of sinkholes, caves, heiaus and burial sites.

    Without archaeological surveys or supervision, huge wide roads were bulldozed through these Hawaiian sites causing massive, irreparable damage to the ancient Kualaka'i trail that is many hundreds if not one thousand years old.

    Also the massive number of well defined Hawaiian habitation sites, numbering in hundreds if not thousands, clearly shows how POOR the Navy BRAC surveys were in identifying Hawaiian cultural sites in ancient Kanehili-Kalaeloa now under the administration of HCDA. The original population living in this area was far greater than anything previously recorded or documented in past Navy BRAC surveys.

    HCDA is using the extremely thin and poorly done 20-25 year old BRAC archaeological surveys to allow rampant use of large bulldozers, such as in the case of Ordy Pond, completely overruling recommendations for Archaeological Inventory Surveys. In this case, the destruction was huge and without any supervision.

    Kapolei Hawn Civic Club files letter with DLNR:

    4/20/2012 Kapolei Hawn Civic Club ltr to HCDA re Site 5119 has been destroyed...

    http://state.hi.us/dlnr/hpd/reviews/det/docRec120422.pdf


  • ghwelker
    http://vimeo.com/63898681 This exhibition has been co-organized by the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center. Drawing from
    Message 69 of 69 , Apr 17, 2013
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      http://vimeo.com/63898681


      This exhibition has been co-organized by the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center.


      Drawing from more than 17,000 objects in the collections of the National Museum of the American Indian, Cerámica de los Ancestros is a celebration of Central America’s diverse and dynamic ancestral heritage. For thousands of years, Central America has been home to vibrant civilizations, each with unique, sophisticated ways of life, value systems, and arts. The ceramics these peoples left behind, combined with recent archaeological discoveries, help tell the stories of these dynamic cultures and their achievements.


      The early histories of Central American cultures follow similar paths. By 1500 BC, people had settled in large villages, where they cultivated, hunted, and gathered wild foods. Maize agriculture supported growing populations, and distinct forms of status, leadership, belief systems, and arts emerged regionally. Social and trade networks connected Central American communities to peoples in South America, Mesoamerica, and the Caribbean, sharing knowledge, technology, artworks, and systems of status and political organization.


      Europeans’ arrival brought further changes. Native peoples have often struggled to maintain distinct identities and lifeways, or have merged with dominant cultures. Despite these changes, the legacy of Central America’s civilizations continues to resonate in their descendants’ lives and those of other Central Americans.


      Cerámica de los Ancestros looks at seven regions representing distinct Central American cultural areas. These regions are today part of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama.


      Accompanied by an interactive website, a landmark publication, and a full schedule of educational and public programs, Cerámica de los Ancestros represents a pioneering effort by the Smithsonian to promote a better understanding of the creative pre-Contact cultures of Central America while engaging a new Latino audience.


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