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Re: [ISO8601] Oral presentation Query (Was: And on a lighternote)

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  • Tex Texin
    It s a good topic for wwdates... Personally, since DOW is redundant information, (easily calculated from the date, but useful as a parity check), I would want
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 5, 2004
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      It's a good topic for wwdates...

      Personally, since DOW is redundant information, (easily calculated from the
      date, but useful as a parity check), I would want to keep it short. So 2 parens
      and text seems like overkill. Why not use the 8601 DOW number, maybe #, : or D
      for an indicator...
      2000 January 1 D6.

      You could extend that to week numbers as well...
      2000 January 1 W1

      It's less work for translators and non-english speakers too.

      How about moving the discussion to wwdates?
      tex

      ivy19991231@... wrote:
      >
      > NASA sometimes uses dates like '2000 January 1' on their site. It's
      > better to put the weekdays after the calander date, as it means less than the
      > calander date itself. How do do this in English has been debated. I do it
      > similar to the Japanese, abbreviations, inside ( ). Like 2000 January 1
      > (Saturday). As for speech, I wuld usually say a date like that as 'two
      > thousand, January one, Saturday'. I think a citation style I've seen before
      > does dates in the format of '2000, January 1'. Maybe this can be used in
      > writing as well?
      >
      > At 2004-09-03 14:47 (UTC+0700), you wrote:
      >
      > > This was a casual observation but it just became important.
      > >
      > > A call from my daughter's school enquires about precisely this,
      > > as their task is difficult enough without considering the oral
      > > perspective.
      > > Describing an international format date-time to children
      > > inescapably -requires- an oral format.
      > >
      > > I have not seen more than the written form,
      > > but I would surmise from what I have seen that the use of ordinals
      > > such as "twenty-third" or "seventeenth" would fall away as well,
      > > since to be truly international we would need to abandon all inflections
      > > in favor of truly numeric expressions.
      > >
      > > Anyone here lend some guidance?
      > > The people asking represent a multinational schooling organization,
      > > and the answer needs to be addressed soon.
      > > My search for educational standards implementing ISO-8601
      > > came up empty, so would this be the first such implementation?
      > >
      > > Regards
      >
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    • ivy19991231@softhome.net
      I guess we ll continue such discussion on wwdates...
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 5, 2004
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        I guess we'll continue such discussion on wwdates...

        At 2004-09-05 11:22 (UTC-0700), you wrote:


        >It's a good topic for wwdates...
        >
        >Personally, since DOW is redundant information, (easily calculated from the
        >date, but useful as a parity check), I would want to keep it short. So 2
        >parens
        >and text seems like overkill. Why not use the 8601 DOW number, maybe #, : or D
        >for an indicator...
        >2000 January 1 D6.
        >
        >You could extend that to week numbers as well...
        >2000 January 1 W1
        >
        >It's less work for translators and non-english speakers too.
        >
        >How about moving the discussion to wwdates?
        >tex
      • g1smd_amsat_org
        [2004-Sep-08] The 2004-09-05 and 2004-Sep-05 format is used a lot by astronomers, and has been for at least 200 years now. At astronomical meetings it is quite
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 7, 2004
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          [2004-Sep-08]


          The 2004-09-05 and 2004-Sep-05 format is used a lot by astronomers,
          and has been for at least 200 years now.

          At astronomical meetings it is quite common for someone to read a date
          like that out loud as ether "Two-Thousand-and-Four September Fifth" or
          as "Two-Thousand-and-Four September the Fifth" and so on.

          Reference to a time might be quoted as "sixteen hours" for "16:00" or
          as "Oh Eight Hours" for "08:00" etc, too.

          Whatever they do, they always read it out in the same order that the
          items are printed on the paper: Year-Month-Day Hours:Minutes:Seconds.


          Cheers,

          Ian.


          [2004-09-08]
        • Fred Bone
          ... Accepting, of course, the risk of putting the audience to sleep ... ;-
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 10, 2004
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            On 9 Sep 2004 at 0:44, ISO8601@yahoogroups.com wrote:

            > The 2004-09-05 and 2004-Sep-05 format is used a lot by astronomers,
            > and has been for at least 200 years now.
            >
            > At astronomical meetings it is quite common for someone to read a date
            > like that out loud as ether

            Accepting, of course, the risk of putting the audience to sleep ...

            ;->
          • ivy19991231@softhome.net
            How is this?
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 10, 2004
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              How is this?

              At 2004-09-10 09:09 (UTC+0100), you wrote:
              >Accepting, of course, the risk of putting the audience to sleep ...
              >
              >;->
            • g1smd_amsat_org
              [2004-Sep-10] ... Ahem. For ether read either . Darn typos. Cheers, Ian. [2004-09-10]
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 10, 2004
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                [2004-Sep-10]



                >> At astronomical meetings it is quite common for someone
                >> to read a date like that out loud as ether

                > Accepting, of course, the risk of putting the audience to sleep ...

                > ;->


                Ahem.

                For "ether" read "either".

                Darn typos.



                Cheers,

                Ian.



                [2004-09-10]
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