Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: questions about time intervals

Expand Messages
  • piebaldconsult
    Remember, these format are essentially for computers to understand, not people, commom usage doesn t apply. The formats are humanly readable simply so they
    Message 1 of 35 , Aug 20, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Remember, these format are essentially for computers to understand,
      not people, "commom usage" doesn't apply. The formats are humanly
      readable simply so they can be checked for acccuracy, they should not
      be presented to the people you intend to have attend your conference.

      The example and explanation in 5.5.4.1 agrees with me. And 5.5.4
      clearly states that the start and end values are time points, not
      durations.

      On the other hand you can use "2004-01-10/2004-01-11:24" (yuck) to
      include the full end day.

      > I think that the standard is clear that a date in absence of a time
      refers to the 24 hour period that day consists of.

      No, it doesn't. Where do you think it does?
    • ivy19991231@softhome.net
      Whoa! Braille varies by country too?
      Message 35 of 35 , Sep 12, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Whoa! Braille varies by country too?

        At 2004-09-12 04:48 (UTC-0700), you wrote:


        >Yes, sign languages (and braille!) vary by country...
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.