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Re: Leap Seconds

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  • piebaldconsult
    Oh, so you don t trust your business partners, I see. Well what would you do with a 23:59:60 that doesn t appear on your list? Send it back for confirmation?
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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      Oh, so you don't trust your business partners, I see.

      Well what would you do with a "23:59:60" that doesn't appear on your
      list? Send it back for confirmation? You can't just say "Well they
      must have meant..." . And will you hold up your own production while
      you wait for confirmation?

      My agreement with a partner would specify that a "23:59:60" isn't
      questioned, just processed. If it's later found to be invalid, well
      shame on them. And if there's a possiblilty of abuse, then a review
      process would need to be established.
    • Tex Texin
      It s not so much a case of trusting people, as trusting their code... And yes, if data isn t valid it can be a reason to bounce a request for service of some
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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        It's not so much a case of trusting people, as trusting their code...

        And yes, if data isn't valid it can be a reason to bounce a request for service
        of some kind. It doesn't necessarily hold up my production.

        Just curious, but what do you if other fields are invalid? 22:90:59...

        But it's just curiousity. With respect to dates and partner agreements, I hope
        we can just stipulate that applications take different approaches with invalid
        data, and how invalid leap seconds are processed might be covered by the
        agreement as well.
        tex

        piebaldconsult wrote:
        >
        > Oh, so you don't trust your business partners, I see.
        >
        > Well what would you do with a "23:59:60" that doesn't appear on your
        > list? Send it back for confirmation? You can't just say "Well they
        > must have meant..." . And will you hold up your own production while
        > you wait for confirmation?
        >
        > My agreement with a partner would specify that a "23:59:60" isn't
        > questioned, just processed. If it's later found to be invalid, well
        > shame on them. And if there's a possiblilty of abuse, then a review
        > process would need to be established.
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --
        -------------------------------------------------------------
        Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898 mailto:Tex@...
        Xen Master http://www.i18nGuy.com

        XenCraft http://www.XenCraft.com
        Making e-Business Work Around the World
        -------------------------------------------------------------
      • BUDAI Andrew
        A note from a language stickler: see the second paragraph below. Budai, Andrew ... From: Tex Texin To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com Sent: 2004 03 19, (Friday)
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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           A note from a language stickler: see the second paragraph below.  Budai, Andrew
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Tex Texin
          Sent: 2004 03 19, (Friday)  05:49
          Subject: Re: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds

          It's not so much a case of trusting people, as trusting their code...

          And yes, if data isn't valid 
          (should read "if data aren't valid" as the singular of data is datum)
          it can be a reason to bounce a request for service
          of some kind. It doesn't necessarily hold up my production.

          Just curious, but what do you if other fields are invalid? 22:90:59...

          But it's just curiousity. With respect to dates and partner agreements, I hope
          we can just stipulate that applications take different approaches with invalid
          data, and how invalid leap seconds are processed might be covered by the
          agreement as well.
          tex

          piebaldconsult wrote:
          >
          > Oh, so you don't trust your business partners, I see.
          >
          > Well what would you do with a "23:59:60" that doesn't appear on your
          > list? Send it back for confirmation? You can't just say "Well they
          > must have meant..." . And will you hold up your own production while
          > you wait for confirmation?
          >
          > My agreement with a partner would specify that a "23:59:60" isn't
          > questioned, just processed. If it's later found to be invalid, well
          > shame on them. And if there's a possiblilty of abuse, then a review
          > process would need to be established.
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >

          --
          -------------------------------------------------------------
          Tex Texin   cell: +1 781 789 1898   mailto:Tex@...
          Xen Master                          http://www.i18nGuy.com
                                  
          XenCraft             http://www.XenCraft.com
          Making e-Business Work Around the World
          -------------------------------------------------------------
        • NGUYEN Adam
          Good that you pointed that out, as I didn t know wether data is a singular or plural word.
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                     Good that you pointed that out, as I didn't know wether data is a singular or plural word.

            At 2004-03-19 06:58 (UTC+0800), you wrote:

             A note from a language stickler: see the second paragraph below.  Budai, Andrew

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Tex Texin
            To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: 2004 03 19, (Friday)  05:49
            Subject: Re: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds

            It's not so much a case of trusting people, as trusting their code...

            And yes, if data isn't valid 
            (should read "if data aren't valid" as the singular of data is datum)
            it can be a reason to bounce a request for service
            of some kind. It doesn't necessarily hold up my production.

            Just curious, but what do you if other fields are invalid? 22:90:59...

            But it's just curiousity. With respect to dates and partner agreements, I hope
            we can just stipulate that applications take different approaches with invalid
            data, and how invalid leap seconds are processed might be covered by the
            agreement as well.
            tex
          • Tex Texin
            Andrew, thanks. If applications validated my English, I would never get any requests served... ;-) -- ... Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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              Andrew, thanks. If applications validated my English, I would never get any
              requests served... ;-)



              --
              -------------------------------------------------------------
              Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898 mailto:Tex@...
              Xen Master http://www.i18nGuy.com

              XenCraft http://www.XenCraft.com
              Making e-Business Work Around the World
              -------------------------------------------------------------
            • Tex Texin
              Adam, you meant to use whether . A wether is a castrated ram. ;-) ... -- ... Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898 mailto:Tex@XenCraft.com Xen Master
              Message 6 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                Adam, you meant to use "whether". A "wether" is a castrated ram.

                ;-)



                NGUYEN Adam wrote:
                >
                > Good that you pointed that out, as I didn't know wether data is a
                > singular or plural word.
                >
                > At 2004-03-19 06:58 (UTC+0800), you wrote:
                >
                > > A note from a language stickler: see the second paragraph below. Budai,
                > > Andrew
                > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: Tex Texin
                > > To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                > > Sent: 2004 03 19, (Friday) 05:49
                > > Subject: Re: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds
                > >
                > > It's not so much a case of trusting people, as trusting their code...
                > >
                > > And yes, if data isn't valid
                > > (should read "if data aren't valid" as the singular of data is datum)
                > > it can be a reason to bounce a request for service
                > > of some kind. It doesn't necessarily hold up my production.
                > >
                > > Just curious, but what do you if other fields are invalid? 22:90:59...
                > >
                > > But it's just curiousity. With respect to dates and partner
                > > agreements, I hope
                > > we can just stipulate that applications take different approaches with
                > > invalid
                > > data, and how invalid leap seconds are processed might be covered by
                > > the
                > > agreement as well.
                > > tex
                > >
                >
                > ---------------------------------------------------------------
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/
                >
                > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > ISO8601-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

                --
                -------------------------------------------------------------
                Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898 mailto:Tex@...
                Xen Master http://www.i18nGuy.com

                XenCraft http://www.XenCraft.com
                Making e-Business Work Around the World
                -------------------------------------------------------------
              • John M. Steele
                But as a standards group, we should point out that there are standards for language. For American English, it is Webster s dictionary. On data, mine say
                Message 7 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                  But as a standards group, we should point out that there are standards for language. For American English, it is Webster's dictionary.
                  On data, mine say "plural, but singular or plural in construction." (Actually, it says it all in abbreviations.) But either "data is" or "data are" is correct per Webster. The standard reference for British or International English is the Oxford, and it may not agree.
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: BUDAI Andrew [mailto:bandi@...]
                  Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 05:58 PM
                  To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds

                   A note from a language stickler: see the second paragraph below.  Budai, Andrew
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Tex Texin
                  Sent: 2004 03 19, (Friday)  05:49
                  Subject: Re: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds

                  It's not so much a case of trusting people, as trusting their code...

                  And yes, if data isn't valid 
                  (should read "if data aren't valid" as the singular of data is datum)
                  it can be a reason to bounce a request for service
                  of some kind.
                • NGUYEN Adam
                  ... Well, me and BUDAI Andrew, as well as countless others use British (International) English; while American English is restricted to a particular country,
                  Message 8 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                    At 2004-03-18 19:57 (UTC-0500), you wrote:

                    But as a standards group, we should point out that there are standards for language. For American English, it is Webster's dictionary.
                    On data, mine say "plural, but singular or plural in construction." (Actually, it says it all in abbreviations.) But either "data is" or "data are" is correct per Webster. The standard reference for British or International English is the Oxford, and it may not agree.

                             Well, me and BUDAI Andrew, as well as countless others use British (International) English; while American English is restricted to a particular country, and/or industry. It's roots are British English, however. I thought the word data has always been used in a plural form (like "This is good data."). I don't agree in American English's way of quoting, where sentence puncutation that's not a part of the actual content being quoted is put inside the quotation marks ("My dog is big," he said in American English and "My dog is big", he said in British (International) English), rather than where they should be: on the outside.

                             I don't want to turn this to a flame war so, I'm just stating my personal opinion, which can differ, depending on someone else reading it.
                  • John M. Steele
                    We re a little off topic, and this should really go to the other group. The issue you raise is not unique to English. Differences exist between Brasilian and
                    Message 9 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                      We're a little off topic, and this should really go to the other group. The issue you raise is not unique to English. Differences exist between Brasilian and Continental Portuguese, Spanish as spoken in Spain vs. Latin America, and versions of French. There is some tendency for Latin America, Japan, and perhaps some other Asian countries to use American rather than British English.
                       
                      While we're being picky, even in British English, wouldn't that be "BUDAI Andrew and I?" On American vs.. British English, it seems necessary to regard both as correct, to be aware of the differences, and for each party to consistently use the version they learned. Although I am familiar with most of the differences, I feel it would be an affectation for me to try to use British English.
                       
                      "How about those leapseconds?"
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: NGUYEN Adam [mailto:adam917@...]
                      Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 08:59 PM
                      To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds

                      At 2004-03-18 19:57 (UTC-0500), you wrote:

                      But as a standards group, we should point out that there are standards for language. For American English, it is Webster's dictionary.
                      On data, mine say "plural, but singular or plural in construction." (Actually, it says it all in abbreviations.) But either "data is" or "data are" is correct per Webster. The standard reference for British or International English is the Oxford, and it may not agree.

                               Well, me and BUDAI Andrew, as well as countless others use British (International) English; while American English is restricted to a particular country, and/or industry. It's roots are British English, however. I thought the word data has always been used in a plural form (like "This is good data."). I don't agree in American English's way of quoting, where sentence puncutation that's not a part of the actual content being quoted is put inside the quotation marks ("My dog is big," he said in American English and "My dog is big", he said in British (International) English), rather than where they should be: on the outside.

                              
                    • Tex Texin
                      Sure. If a duration is a billion leap seconds, how long is it in the US and how long is it in the UK? (hint, they are not the same.) ;-) ... -- ... Tex Texin
                      Message 10 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                        Sure. If a duration is a billion leap seconds, how long is it in the US and how
                        long is it in the UK?

                        (hint, they are not the same.)
                        ;-)

                        > "John M. Steele" wrote:
                        >
                        > We're a little off topic, and this should really go to the other group. The
                        > issue you raise is not unique to English. Differences exist between Brasilian
                        > and Continental Portuguese, Spanish as spoken in Spain vs. Latin America, and
                        > versions of French. There is some tendency for Latin America, Japan, and
                        > perhaps some other Asian countries to use American rather than British
                        > English.
                        >
                        > While we're being picky, even in British English, wouldn't that be "BUDAI
                        > Andrew and I?" On American vs.. British English, it seems necessary to regard
                        > both as correct, to be aware of the differences, and for each party to
                        > consistently use the version they learned. Although I am familiar with most
                        > of the differences, I feel it would be an affectation for me to try to use
                        > British English.
                        >
                        > "How about those leapseconds?"
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: NGUYEN Adam [mailto:adam917@...]
                        > Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 08:59 PM
                        > To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: RE: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds
                        >
                        > At 2004-03-18 19:57 (UTC-0500), you wrote:
                        >
                        > > But as a standards group, we should point out that there are
                        > > standards for language. For American English, it is Webster's
                        > > dictionary.
                        > > On data, mine say "plural, but singular or plural in
                        > > construction." (Actually, it says it all in abbreviations.) But
                        > > either "data is" or "data are" is correct per Webster. The
                        > > standard reference for British or International English is the
                        > > Oxford, and it may not agree.
                        >
                        > Well, me and BUDAI Andrew, as well as countless others use
                        > British (International) English; while American English is
                        > restricted to a particular country, and/or industry. It's roots are
                        > British English, however. I thought the word data has always been
                        > used in a plural form (like "This is good data."). I don't agree in
                        > American English's way of quoting, where sentence puncutation
                        > that's not a part of the actual content being quoted is put inside
                        > the quotation marks ("My dog is big," he said in American English
                        > and "My dog is big", he said in British (International) English),
                        > rather than where they should be: on the outside.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                        > ADVERTISEMENT
                        > [click here]
                        >
                        >
                        > ---------------------------------------------------------------
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/
                        >
                        > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        > ISO8601-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

                        --
                        -------------------------------------------------------------
                        Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898 mailto:Tex@...
                        Xen Master http://www.i18nGuy.com

                        XenCraft http://www.XenCraft.com
                        Making e-Business Work Around the World
                        -------------------------------------------------------------
                      • John M. Steele
                        10^9 (US), 10^12 (UK). What does it mean to table the topic? ... From: Tex Texin [mailto:tex@xencraft.com] Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 09:25 PM To:
                        Message 11 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                          10^9 (US), 10^12 (UK). What does it mean to table the topic?
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Tex Texin [mailto:tex@...]
                          Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 09:25 PM
                          To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds

                          Sure. If a duration is a billion leap seconds, how long is it in the US and how
                          long is it in the UK?

                          (hint, they are not the same.)
                          ;-)

                          > "John M. Steele" wrote:
                          >
                          > We're a little off topic, and this should really go to the other group. The
                          > issue you raise is not unique to English. Differences exist between Brasilian
                          > and Continental Portuguese, Spanish as spoken in Spain vs. Latin America, and
                          > versions of French. There is some tendency for Latin America, Japan, and
                          > perhaps some other Asian countries to use American rather than British
                          > English.
                          >
                          > While we're being picky, even in British English, wouldn't that be "BUDAI
                          > Andrew and I?" On American vs.. British English, it seems necessary to regard
                          > both as correct, to be aware of the differences, and for each party to
                          > consistently use the version they learned. Although I am familiar with most
                          > of the differences, I feel it would be an affectation for me to try to use
                          > British English.
                          >
                          > "How about those leapseconds?"
                          >
                          >      -----Original Message-----
                          >      From: NGUYEN Adam [mailto:adam917@...]
                          >      Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 08:59 PM
                          >      To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                          >      Subject: RE: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds
                          >
                          >      At 2004-03-18 19:57 (UTC-0500), you wrote:
                          >
                          >     >  But as a standards group, we should point out that there are
                          >     >  standards for language. For American English, it is Webster's
                          >     >  dictionary.
                          >     >  On data, mine say "plural, but singular or plural in
                          >     >  construction." (Actually, it says it all in abbreviations.) But
                          >     >  either "data is" or "data are" is correct per Webster. The
                          >     >  standard reference for British or International English is the
                          >     >  Oxford, and it may not agree.
                          >
                          >              Well, me and BUDAI Andrew, as well as countless others use
                          >      British (International) English; while American English is
                          >      restricted to a particular country, and/or industry. It's roots are
                          >      British English, however. I thought the word data has always been
                          >      used in a plural form (like "This is good data."). I don't agree in
                          >      American English's way of quoting, where sentence puncutation
                          >      that's not a part of the actual content being quoted is put inside
                          >      the quotation marks ("My dog is big," he said in American English
                          >      and "My dog is big", he said in British (International) English),
                          >      rather than where they should be: on the outside.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >                    Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                          >                        ADVERTISEMENT
                          >                         [click here]
                          >
                          >
                          >        ---------------------------------------------------------------
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >    * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                          >      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/
                          >
                          >    * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                          >      ISO8601-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                          >
                          >    * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

                          --
                          -------------------------------------------------------------
                          Tex Texin   cell: +1 781 789 1898   mailto:Tex@...
                          Xen Master                          http://www.i18nGuy.com
                                                  
                          XenCraft                        http://www.XenCraft.com
                          Making e-Business Work Around the World
                          -------------------------------------------------------------

                        • Tex Texin
                          In the US table means postpone it for discussion some other time. in the UK discuss it now. But what does table have to do with leap seconds? ;-) Speaking of
                          Message 12 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                            In the US table means postpone it for discussion some other time. in the UK
                            discuss it now.

                            But what does table have to do with leap seconds? ;-)

                            Speaking of leaping:

                            I am wearing a jumper. What part(s) of me are covered?
                            (Not too graphic a description and please no images.)




                            > "John M. Steele" wrote:
                            >
                            > 10^9 (US), 10^12 (UK). What does it mean to table the topic?
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: Tex Texin [mailto:tex@...]
                            > Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 09:25 PM
                            > To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: Re: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds
                            >
                            > Sure. If a duration is a billion leap seconds, how long is it in
                            > the US and how
                            > long is it in the UK?
                            >
                            > (hint, they are not the same.)
                            > ;-)
                            >
                            > > "John M. Steele" wrote:
                            > >
                            > > We're a little off topic, and this should really go to the other
                            > group. The
                            > > issue you raise is not unique to English. Differences exist
                            > between Brasilian
                            > > and Continental Portuguese, Spanish as spoken in Spain vs. Latin
                            > America, and
                            > > versions of French. There is some tendency for Latin America,
                            > Japan, and
                            > > perhaps some other Asian countries to use American rather than
                            > British
                            > > English.
                            > >
                            > > While we're being picky, even in British English, wouldn't that
                            > be "BUDAI
                            > > Andrew and I?" On American vs.. British English, it seems
                            > necessary to regard
                            > > both as correct, to be aware of the differences, and for each
                            > party to
                            > > consistently use the version they learned. Although I am familiar
                            > with most
                            > > of the differences, I feel it would be an affectation for me to
                            > try to use
                            > > British English.
                            > >
                            > > "How about those leapseconds?"
                            > >
                            > > -----Original Message-----
                            > > From: NGUYEN Adam [mailto:adam917@...]
                            > > Sent: Thursday, March 18, 2004 08:59 PM
                            > > To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
                            > > Subject: RE: [ISO8601] Re: Leap Seconds
                            > >
                            > > At 2004-03-18 19:57 (UTC-0500), you wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > But as a standards group, we should point out that there
                            > are
                            > > > standards for language. For American English, it is
                            > Webster's
                            > > > dictionary.
                            > > > On data, mine say "plural, but singular or plural in
                            > > > construction." (Actually, it says it all in
                            > abbreviations.) But
                            > > > either "data is" or "data are" is correct per Webster. The
                            > > > standard reference for British or International English is
                            > the
                            > > > Oxford, and it may not agree.
                            > >
                            > > Well, me and BUDAI Andrew, as well as countless
                            > others use
                            > > British (International) English; while American English is
                            > > restricted to a particular country, and/or industry. It's
                            > roots are
                            > > British English, however. I thought the word data has always
                            > been
                            > > used in a plural form (like "This is good data."). I don't
                            > agree in
                            > > American English's way of quoting, where sentence
                            > puncutation
                            > > that's not a part of the actual content being quoted is put
                            > inside
                            > > the quotation marks ("My dog is big," he said in American
                            > English
                            > > and "My dog is big", he said in British (International)
                            > English),
                            > > rather than where they should be: on the outside.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                            > > ADVERTISEMENT
                            > > [click here]
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > ---------------------------------------------------------------
                            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > >
                            > > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                            > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/
                            > >
                            > > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                            > > ISO8601-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                            > >
                            > > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                            > Service.
                            >
                            > --
                            > -------------------------------------------------------------
                            > Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898 mailto:Tex@...
                            > Xen Master http://www.i18nGuy.com
                            >
                            > XenCraft http://www.XenCraft.com
                            > Making e-Business Work Around the World
                            > -------------------------------------------------------------
                            >
                            > ---------------------------------------------------------------
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
                            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/
                            >
                            > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                            > ISO8601-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                            >
                            > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                            > Service.

                            --
                            -------------------------------------------------------------
                            Tex Texin cell: +1 781 789 1898 mailto:Tex@...
                            Xen Master http://www.i18nGuy.com

                            XenCraft http://www.XenCraft.com
                            Making e-Business Work Around the World
                            -------------------------------------------------------------
                          • NGUYEN Adam
                            ... Ooooh... How about those? How about 86400 of them? What would a time be if it had that many leap seconds in that day?
                            Message 13 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
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                              At 2004-03-18 21:16 (UTC-0500), you wrote:
                              "How about those leapseconds?"

                              Ooooh... How about those? How about 86400 of them? What would a time be if it had that many leap seconds in that day?
                            • Tex Texin
                              not sure about the time, but its a pretty good guess the date is feb 29. ;-)
                              Message 14 of 18 , Mar 18, 2004
                              • 0 Attachment
                                not sure about the time, but its a pretty good guess the date is feb 29.
                                ;-)

                                NGUYEN Adam wrote:
                                > > "How about those leapseconds?"
                                >
                                > Ooooh... How about those? How about 86400 of them? What would a time be if it
                                > had that many leap seconds in that day?
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