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Re: [ISO8601] My revised page of numbers and ISO 8601 (links in the group need updates)

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  • Ed Davies
    ... Thanks for pointing that out. I hadn t noticed this paragraph before. What it says (at the end of section 5.5.2 in the draft 8601:2000 I have to hand): #
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 17, 2003
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      jus168jih@... wrote:

      > ...
      > ISO 8601 uses a solidus (/) for time-intervals, but it recognizes that
      > certain application areas use a double hyphen (--).

      Thanks for pointing that out. I hadn't noticed this paragraph before.
      What it says (at the end of section 5.5.2 in the draft 8601:2000 I have
      to hand):

      # NOTE In certain application areas a double hyphen is used as a
      # separator instead of a solidus.

      This is horrible. It is not made clear whether the application areas
      referred to are considered to be conforming to the standard or not.
      Perhaps this is another of those assertions which should be prefixed
      with "by mutual agreement".

      Also, it doesn't mix well with the truncated representations. E.g.,
      using the truncated representation for a specific day in an implied
      month (5.2.1.3 f) you might write the three days starting today as:

      2003-09-17/---19

      which would become:

      2003-09-17-----19

      which looks a bit silly to me.

      I think it would be better to avoid the double hyphen as a separator
      unless it is actually present in legacy data.

      jus168jih@... further wrote:

      > What I wonder is if it
      > will be better to use a right-ward arrow
      > ...

      Right arrow would make some sense in the case where a time-interval is
      specified by a start and an end. However, it would look a bit odd when
      a start and a duration or, particularly, a duration and an end are used:

      2003-09-17T18:00Z->P2H

      for the two hour period starting at six o'clock this evening or,

      P6M->2003-09

      for the six months ending this month.

      Overall, the only problem with using solidus for time intervals that I
      can see is that it clashes a bit with the date separator character
      used in many non-ISO 8601 date formats. Applications which are using
      ISO 8601 for the expression of time intervals are probably well
      enough controlled that no confusion would arise. Therefore, I really
      don't see any good reason to make this change.

      Ed.
    • Vincent Lefevre
      ... But it can (and must) be encoded as , so there would be no problems in practice. -- Vincent Lefèvre - Web:
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 17, 2003
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        On 2003-09-16 09:53:37 -0400, Jon Sears wrote:
        > Justin - a 'greater-than' sign (right-ward arrow) would likely cause
        > parser errors in XML applications. It is a reserved character for tags
        > in the markup.

        But it can (and must) be encoded as ">", so there would be no
        problems in practice.

        --
        Vincent Lefèvre <vincent@...> - Web: <http://www.vinc17.org/> - 100%
        validated (X)HTML - Acorn Risc PC, Yellow Pig 17, Championnat International
        des Jeux Mathématiques et Logiques, TETRHEX, etc.
        Work: CR INRIA - computer arithmetic / SPACES project at LORIA
      • Pete Forman
        ... Sorry to be picky but that should be may not must in this context. Only must be escaped is when it
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 17, 2003
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          At 2003-09-17 11:57 +0200, Vincent Lefevre wrote:
          >On 2003-09-16 09:53:37 -0400, Jon Sears wrote:
          > > Justin - a 'greater-than' sign (right-ward arrow) would likely cause
          > > parser errors in XML applications. It is a reserved character for tags
          > > in the markup.
          >
          >But it can (and must) be encoded as ">", so there would be no
          >problems in practice.

          Sorry to be picky but that should be "may" not "must" in this
          context. Only < and & must be escaped. The only time that > must be
          escaped is when it might be confused with the end of a CDATA section.

          http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml#syntax

          --
          Pete Forman -./\.- Disclaimer: This post is originated
          WesternGeco -./\.- by myself and does not represent
          pete.forman@... -./\.- opinion of Schlumberger, Baker
          http://petef.port5.com -./\.- Hughes or their divisions.
        • piebaldconsult
          ... cause ... for tags ... be ... section. ... And that would only apply when putting an ISO8601 date on a Web page, rather than a data file. And in such cases
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 17, 2003
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            --- In ISO8601@yahoogroups.com, Pete Forman <pete.forman@w...> wrote:
            > At 2003-09-17 11:57 +0200, Vincent Lefevre wrote:
            > >On 2003-09-16 09:53:37 -0400, Jon Sears wrote:
            > > > Justin - a 'greater-than' sign (right-ward arrow) would likely
            cause
            > > > parser errors in XML applications. It is a reserved character
            for tags
            > > > in the markup.
            > >
            > >But it can (and must) be encoded as ">", so there would be no
            > >problems in practice.
            >
            > Sorry to be picky but that should be "may" not "must" in this
            > context. Only < and & must be escaped. The only time that > must
            be
            > escaped is when it might be confused with the end of a CDATA
            section.
            >
            > http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml#syntax

            And that would only apply when putting an ISO8601 date on a Web page,
            rather than a data file. And in such cases I would suggest using a
            more human-friendly format rather than ISO8601 anyway.
            Such as something like: "The conference will begin at 10:00 on Friday
            2003-09-19 and run through 20:00 on Sunday 2003-09-21".

            ISO8601 is for information interchange (generally between computers),
            the Web is to relate information to humans.
            Also remember that some of the separators, like the hyphen (-) in the
            date is not required, and even frowned-upon (if memory serves).
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