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RE: [ISO8601] Re: ISO 8601 for .Net

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  • Charles Salvo
    I never suggested that ISO 8601 include time zone information. But ISO creates innumerable specs. The tz database group tracks DST changes from a network of
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 21, 2007
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      I never suggested that ISO 8601 include time zone information. But ISO creates innumerable specs.

       

      The tz database group tracks DST changes from a network of members around the world who read the local papers and follow legislation.

      ISO could provide a central repository of all DST changes.

       

      After I use ISO 8601 to exchange time information, I am free to convert to any local time as I see fit. For example, before telephoning Europe , I always convert to their local time ---- doesn’t make me a bad person.

       

       


      From: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com [mailto: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of piebaldconsult
      Sent: Sunday, January 21, 2007 8:36 PM
      To: ISO8601@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [ISO8601] Re: ISO 8601 for .Net

       

      > The alternative is the tz database project. They keep up to date, with

      > frequent updates, with all the various changes to Daylight Savings
      changes
      > around the world. Plus, it includes a historical record, so the date
      > transitions can be computed for any prior year.

      One should never attempt to convert to someone else's local time.
      Everyone is responsible only for converting to their own.

      > I'm surprised that ISO has not tried to bring some uniformity to this.

      It does, by supporting only a flat offset with no regard to what it
      means.

      Besides, ISO 8601 covers only the interchange of the information, not
      i

    • piebaldconsult
      ... Yes, they could. Or the U.N. Oh, wait, you said DST -- DST is evil. ... convert to ... True, but then ISO 8601 wouldn t be involved anyway. Were you to
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 21, 2007
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        > ISO could provide a central repository of all DST changes.

        Yes, they could. Or the U.N.

        Oh, wait, you said DST -- DST is evil.

        > After I use ISO 8601 to exchange time information, I am free to
        convert to
        > any local time as I see fit. For example, before telephoning Europe, I
        > always convert to their local time ---- doesn't make me a bad person.

        True, but then ISO 8601 wouldn't be involved anyway. Were you to
        _schedule_ the call, by interchanging the time in the future that you
        would like to make the call, you can make a rough estimate of what
        local time might be acceptable to the recipient, but you should still
        use UTC, in case you make a mistake, or the recipient isn't using the
        expected offset.
      • hjwoudenberg@aol.com
        In a message dated 1/21/2007 10:22:19 A.M. Central Standard Time, csalvo@bellsouth.net writes: I’m surprised that ISO has not tried to bring some uniformity
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 27, 2007
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          In a message dated 1/21/2007 10:22:19 A.M. Central Standard Time, csalvo@... writes:

          I’m surprised that ISO has not tried to bring some uniformity to this.

           
           
          Right, uniformity is critical.
           
          tz.database is a compiled database.  All compilers are not equal.
           
          The problems are daily.
           
          hjw
        • hjwoudenberg@aol.com
          In a message dated 1/21/2007 9:53:35 P.M. Central Standard Time, csalvo@bellsouth.net writes: ISO could provide a central repository of all DST changes. This
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 27, 2007
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            In a message dated 1/21/2007 9:53:35 P.M. Central Standard Time, csalvo@... writes:

            ISO could provide a central repository of all DST changes.

            This is a UNICODE W3C project

            Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) Project

            "Not long ago, computer systems were like separate worlds, isolated from one another. The internet and related events have changed all that. A single system can be built of many different components, hardware and software, all needing to work together. Many different technologies have been important in bridging the gaps; in the internationalization arena, Unicode has provided a lingua franca for communicating textual data. But there remain differences in the locale data used by different systems.

            Common, recommended practice for internationalization is to store and communicate language-neutral data, and format that data for the client. This formatting can take place on any of a number of the components in a system; a server might format data based on the user's locale, or it could be that a client machine does the formatting. The same goes for parsing data, and locale-sensitive analysis of data.

             

            http://xml.coverpages.org/ni2004-04-21-a.html

             

            hjw

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