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Re: Fraction of days, hours, minutes, seconds.

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  • piebaldconsult
    ... 12:59:59:59. I was about to say: But that s _not_ base-60! That s base-10 used to show a value in the range of 0 ... 59. However, I think I (finally) see
    Message 1 of 35 , Sep 30, 2006
      > theoretically be represented the same way using base-60, i.e.
      12:59:59:59.

      I was about to say:
      But that's _not_ base-60! That's base-10 used to show a value in the
      range of 0 ... 59.

      However, I think I (finally) see what you're getting at (that's "you"
      plural because I've been working on a reply to something else all day
      and making no headway). (Would "youse're" be OK in this context?)

      <aside>
      By the way, that reply began...

      >> I just don't agree with the use of the word "base" in this
      context
      >
      > Is radix OK

      Unfortunately, according to Merriam-Webster.com,

      "
      Radix
      1 : the base of a number system or of logarithms
      "

      So it seems they mean the same thing.
      </aside>

      If it's base-60, there must be sixty numerals, and a value in the
      range of 0 ... 59 requires only one digit. So, the question is, what
      sixty thingamabobs can be used to represent these sixty numerals, yet
      still fit ISO 8601?

      I think you're saying (or hinting, or I'm on my own) that we can use
      the numerals 00, 01, 02, ... 59, which to the untrained eye look an
      awful lot like two base-10 digits.
      (Borrowing from the common use of 0 ... F for base-16 numerals, where
      the A ... F look like alphabetic letters.)

      That's ingenious!

      All we have to do is cheat and say something like, "In the absence of
      glyphs for these numerals in the repertoire, we'll use two
      appropriate existing glyphs (0 ... 9) to stand in for the required
      glyphs". (But with more authority.)

      A similar tactic may be used for hours, days, months, weeks, whatever.
    • piebaldconsult
      ... Which might be required, after all the concept leap second is pretty much hour/minute/second-centric. But I doubt we could get the IERS to also define
      Message 35 of 35 , Oct 3, 2006
        > Probably another way to solve the Leap Second issue would be to adopt
        > a new leap second scheme for decimal days, if decimal days becomes a
        > common representation of parts of a day in the future.

        Which might be required, after all the concept "leap second" is pretty
        much hour/minute/second-centric. But I doubt we could get the IERS to
        also define leap-thousandths.

        This sort of thing may be why ISO 8601 hesitates to support fractional
        days. And why W3C shuns leap seconds.
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