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Re: Day Number in the Aristean Calendar

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  • Aristeo Canlas Fernando
    Dear John and my Fellowmen, Thank you, John, for pointing out that the present ISO 8601 is for the Gregorian calendar. I posted here the Aristean calendar
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 16, 2005
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      Dear John and my Fellowmen,

      Thank you, John, for pointing out that the present ISO 8601 is for
      the Gregorian calendar. I posted here the Aristean calendar because
      it is similar to the Gregorian calendar. Both are solar calendars
      with 365 days in common years and 366 days in leap years. So the
      provisions of ISO 8601 may be applied also when the Aristean
      calendar is implemented.

      Of course, some rules have to be modified. For example, week 1 is
      simply and always will be January 1 to 7 in the Aristean calendar.
      No ifs anymore. There are day numbers in the Aristean calendar
      which will always be Sunday, red-letter day. In the Gregorian
      calendar, a day number may be Monday (day 1) or Tuesday (day 2), and
      so forth. I just wanted to illustrate that the Aristean calendar is
      much simpler than the Gregorian calendar. So there is a need to
      reform the Gregorian calendar and apply the relevant ISO 8601 rules
      to it and modify some of them.

      Fractional part of the day should be added to ISO 8601 since this is
      used by astronomers using the Julian Number (or Julian Day Number?).

      Best regards,
      Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
      Motto: pro aris et focis
      http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/

      --- In ISO8601@yahoogroups.com, "John Hynes" <john@h...> wrote:
      >
      > This group is about ISO 8601, which uses the Gregorian calendar. I
      > would recommend posting this to the Calendar-Reform group at
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Calendar-Reform/.
      >
      > Regarding time format, I proposed adding fractional day
      representation
      > in my post dated April 1, which you can read at
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/message/1287 . Although
      this is
      > not part of the ISO standard, fractional days are used with dates
      by
      > astronomers, in forms such as 2005 Oct. 16.110.
      >
      > Note that currently ISO 8601 accepts the representation of time of
      the
      > day using fractional hours, minutes or seconds, such as:
      >
      > 2005-10-16T02.6875 (fractional hour)
      > 2005-10-16T02:41.25 (fractional minute)
      > 2005-10-16T02:41:15.001 (fractional second)
      >
      > John Hynes
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