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Re: [ISO8601] Day Number in the Aristean Calendar

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  • NGUYEN Ivy
    The only thing I never liked about this was the time of day: Its main unit is a decimal multiple, but what kind of multiple is the question. Not a straight
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 14, 2005
      The only thing I never liked about this was the time of day: Its main
      unit is a decimal multiple, but what kind of multiple is the question.
      Not a straight 10/100/100 (well, really 9/99/99) system. Otherwise, it
      works very nicely. It would be possible to memorise and know in
      advance what weekday every date falls on every year. :-)

      On 14/10/05, Aristeo Canlas Fernando <calendaracf@...> wrote:
      > My Dear Fellowmen,
      >
      > The Aristean Calendar is a perpetual calendar. The day of the week
      > and the date are the same year after year. For example, presently,
      > if your birthday falls on Monday, next year, it would fall on
      > Tuesday, etc.
      >
      > In the Aristean calendar, your birthday will fall on the same day of
      > the week always. Hence, if your birthday is on October 15, every
      > year, your birthday will fall on Monday.
      >
      > What is the day number of October 15? It is the 288th day of the
      > year. The day before is Sunday, the 277th day, October 14. It is a
      > red-letter day because it is Sunday and the end of the week, week 41.
      >
      > The table of Day Number is found at
      > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/daynumber.htm. If the day
      > number is known and you would like to determine the day of the week,
      > the way of finding it is found at
      > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/dayofweek.htm.
      >
      > Your questions will be appreciated.
      >
      > Best regards,
      > Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
      > Motto: pro aris et focis
      > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/
    • Aristeo Canlas Fernando
      Dear Ivy and my Fellowmen, You are looking for a straight 10/100/100 decimal format for a day. The Aristean Decimal Time is 100/10/100. It is still in
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 14, 2005
        Dear Ivy and my Fellowmen,

        You are looking for a "straight 10/100/100" decimal format for a
        day. The Aristean Decimal Time is 100/10/100. It is still in
        decimal though. And dividing the day into 100 units may be better
        than just 10. Each of the 100 units may just be about equal to the
        present 15 minutes. And this is how we tell the time -- quarter
        past the hour, half hour, quarter to the hour. An hour seems to be
        a long time compared to a quarter of it.

        It is hard to make the calendar of 365 days in a year decimal. So
        the two issues are separated. The Aristean calendar is similar to
        the present calendar but made perpetual and the Aristean Decimal
        Time is made as decimal for simpler expression and calculation.

        Best regards,
        Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
        Motto: pro aris et focis
        http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/

        --- In ISO8601@yahoogroups.com, NGUYEN Ivy <nguyenivy@g...> wrote:
        >
        > The only thing I never liked about this was the time of day: Its
        main
        > unit is a decimal multiple, but what kind of multiple is the
        question.
        > Not a straight 10/100/100 (well, really 9/99/99) system.
        Otherwise, it
        > works very nicely. It would be possible to memorise and know in
        > advance what weekday every date falls on every year. :-)
        >
        > On 14/10/05, Aristeo Canlas Fernando <calendaracf@y...> wrote:
        > > My Dear Fellowmen,
        > >
        > > The Aristean Calendar is a perpetual calendar. The day of the
        week
        > > and the date are the same year after year. For example,
        presently,
        > > if your birthday falls on Monday, next year, it would fall on
        > > Tuesday, etc.
        > >
        > > In the Aristean calendar, your birthday will fall on the same
        day of
        > > the week always. Hence, if your birthday is on October 15, every
        > > year, your birthday will fall on Monday.
        > >
        > > What is the day number of October 15? It is the 288th day of the
        > > year. The day before is Sunday, the 277th day, October 14. It
        is a
        > > red-letter day because it is Sunday and the end of the week,
        week 41.
        > >
        > > The table of Day Number is found at
        > > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/daynumber.htm. If the
        day
        > > number is known and you would like to determine the day of the
        week,
        > > the way of finding it is found at
        > > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/dayofweek.htm.
        > >
        > > Your questions will be appreciated.
        > >
        > > Best regards,
        > > Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
        > > Motto: pro aris et focis
        > > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/
        >
      • NGUYEN Ivy
        Good point! :-)
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 15, 2005
          Good point! :-)

          On 14/10/05, Aristeo Canlas Fernando <calendaracf@...> wrote:
          > Dear Ivy and my Fellowmen,
          >
          > You are looking for a "straight 10/100/100" decimal format for a
          > day. The Aristean Decimal Time is 100/10/100. It is still in
          > decimal though. And dividing the day into 100 units may be better
          > than just 10. Each of the 100 units may just be about equal to the
          > present 15 minutes. And this is how we tell the time -- quarter
          > past the hour, half hour, quarter to the hour. An hour seems to be
          > a long time compared to a quarter of it.
          >
          > It is hard to make the calendar of 365 days in a year decimal. So
          > the two issues are separated. The Aristean calendar is similar to
          > the present calendar but made perpetual and the Aristean Decimal
          > Time is made as decimal for simpler expression and calculation.
          >
          > Best regards,
          > Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
          > Motto: pro aris et focis
          > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/
        • John Hynes
          This group is about ISO 8601, which uses the Gregorian calendar. I would recommend posting this to the Calendar-Reform group at
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 15, 2005
            This group is about ISO 8601, which uses the Gregorian calendar. I
            would recommend posting this to the Calendar-Reform group at
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Calendar-Reform/.

            Regarding time format, I proposed adding fractional day representation
            in my post dated April 1, which you can read at
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/message/1287 . Although this is
            not part of the ISO standard, fractional days are used with dates by
            astronomers, in forms such as 2005 Oct. 16.110.

            Note that currently ISO 8601 accepts the representation of time of the
            day using fractional hours, minutes or seconds, such as:

            2005-10-16T02.6875 (fractional hour)
            2005-10-16T02:41.25 (fractional minute)
            2005-10-16T02:41:15.001 (fractional second)

            John Hynes

            --- In ISO8601@yahoogroups.com, "Aristeo Canlas Fernando"
            <calendaracf@y...> wrote:
            >
            > My Dear Fellowmen,
            >
            > The Aristean Calendar is a perpetual calendar. The day of the week
            > and the date are the same year after year. For example, presently,
            > if your birthday falls on Monday, next year, it would fall on
            > Tuesday, etc.
            >
            > In the Aristean calendar, your birthday will fall on the same day of
            > the week always. Hence, if your birthday is on October 15, every
            > year, your birthday will fall on Monday.
            >
            > What is the day number of October 15? It is the 288th day of the
            > year. The day before is Sunday, the 277th day, October 14. It is a
            > red-letter day because it is Sunday and the end of the week, week 41.
            >
            > The table of Day Number is found at
            > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/daynumber.htm. If the day
            > number is known and you would like to determine the day of the week,
            > the way of finding it is found at
            > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/dayofweek.htm.
            >
            > Your questions will be appreciated.
            >
            > Best regards,
            > Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
            > Motto: pro aris et focis
            > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/
            >
          • Aristeo Canlas Fernando
            Dear John and my Fellowmen, Thank you, John, for pointing out that the present ISO 8601 is for the Gregorian calendar. I posted here the Aristean calendar
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 16, 2005
              Dear John and my Fellowmen,

              Thank you, John, for pointing out that the present ISO 8601 is for
              the Gregorian calendar. I posted here the Aristean calendar because
              it is similar to the Gregorian calendar. Both are solar calendars
              with 365 days in common years and 366 days in leap years. So the
              provisions of ISO 8601 may be applied also when the Aristean
              calendar is implemented.

              Of course, some rules have to be modified. For example, week 1 is
              simply and always will be January 1 to 7 in the Aristean calendar.
              No ifs anymore. There are day numbers in the Aristean calendar
              which will always be Sunday, red-letter day. In the Gregorian
              calendar, a day number may be Monday (day 1) or Tuesday (day 2), and
              so forth. I just wanted to illustrate that the Aristean calendar is
              much simpler than the Gregorian calendar. So there is a need to
              reform the Gregorian calendar and apply the relevant ISO 8601 rules
              to it and modify some of them.

              Fractional part of the day should be added to ISO 8601 since this is
              used by astronomers using the Julian Number (or Julian Day Number?).

              Best regards,
              Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
              Motto: pro aris et focis
              http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/

              --- In ISO8601@yahoogroups.com, "John Hynes" <john@h...> wrote:
              >
              > This group is about ISO 8601, which uses the Gregorian calendar. I
              > would recommend posting this to the Calendar-Reform group at
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Calendar-Reform/.
              >
              > Regarding time format, I proposed adding fractional day
              representation
              > in my post dated April 1, which you can read at
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/message/1287 . Although
              this is
              > not part of the ISO standard, fractional days are used with dates
              by
              > astronomers, in forms such as 2005 Oct. 16.110.
              >
              > Note that currently ISO 8601 accepts the representation of time of
              the
              > day using fractional hours, minutes or seconds, such as:
              >
              > 2005-10-16T02.6875 (fractional hour)
              > 2005-10-16T02:41.25 (fractional minute)
              > 2005-10-16T02:41:15.001 (fractional second)
              >
              > John Hynes
            • Aristeo Canlas Fernando
              Dear Ivy and my ISO8601 Enthusiasts, Thank you, Ivy, for you comment. I hope you will support the Aristean calendar and the Aristean Decimal Time. We just
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 16, 2005
                Dear Ivy and my ISO8601 Enthusiasts,

                Thank you, Ivy, for you comment.

                I hope you will support the Aristean calendar and the Aristean
                Decimal Time. We just need to reform our calendar and time
                systems. They can be improved and we can do it sooner rather than
                later.

                As one wise man said:
                If we don't speak up, who will speak up?
                If we don't move, who will move?
                If not now, when will it ever be?

                Best regards,
                Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
                Motto: pro aris et focis
                http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/

                --- In ISO8601@yahoogroups.com, NGUYEN Ivy <nguyenivy@g...> wrote:
                >
                > Good point! :-)
                >
                > On 14/10/05, Aristeo Canlas Fernando <calendaracf@y...> wrote:
                > > Dear Ivy and my Fellowmen,
                > >
                > > You are looking for a "straight 10/100/100" decimal format for a
                > > day. The Aristean Decimal Time is 100/10/100. It is still in
                > > decimal though. And dividing the day into 100 units may be
                better
                > > than just 10. Each of the 100 units may just be about equal to
                the
                > > present 15 minutes. And this is how we tell the time -- quarter
                > > past the hour, half hour, quarter to the hour. An hour seems to
                be
                > > a long time compared to a quarter of it.
                > >
                > > It is hard to make the calendar of 365 days in a year decimal.
                So
                > > the two issues are separated. The Aristean calendar is similar
                to
                > > the present calendar but made perpetual and the Aristean Decimal
                > > Time is made as decimal for simpler expression and calculation.
                > >
                > > Best regards,
                > > Aristeo Canlas Fernando, Peace Crusader
                > > Motto: pro aris et focis
                > > http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/
                >
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