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J R Stockon writes that ISO-8601(2004) allows a space btween date and time?

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  • hjwoudenberg@aol.com
    Does anyone have the enact statement? The ISO preferred formats are derived from :- * Calendar Date : yyyy-mm-ddThh-mm-ss I often use a space (allowed in
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
      Does anyone have the enact statement?

      The ISO preferred formats are derived from :-

      • Calendar Date : yyyy-mm-ddThh-mm-ss

      I often use a space (allowed in :2004) instead of the T, but the T does make the data into a single "word".

    • Vincent Lefevre
      ... It should be yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss (possibly with a fractional part and/or timezone information). ... When the date is to be read by a human, it is better to
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
        On 2005-09-27 13:43:25 -0400, hjwoudenberg@... wrote:
        > Does anyone have the enact statement?
        >
        > The ISO preferred formats are derived from :-
        > * Calendar Date : yyyy-mm-ddThh-mm-ss

        It should be yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss (possibly with a fractional part
        and/or timezone information).

        > I often use a space (allowed in :2004) instead of the T, but the T
        > does make the data into a single "word".

        When the date is to be read by a human, it is better to replace the
        T by a space (see the first line of my message). When it is intended
        for automatical processing, you should use a T.

        --
        Vincent Lefèvre <vincent@...> - Web: <http://www.vinc17.org/>
        100% accessible validated (X)HTML - Blog: <http://www.vinc17.org/blog/>
        Work: CR INRIA - computer arithmetic / SPACES project at LORIA
      • Peter Haas
        I think strictly speaking Dr. Stockton is wrong. Regarding the time designator there is not any difference between the first (1988), second (2000) and third
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
          I think strictly speaking Dr. Stockton is wrong.

          Regarding the time designator there is not any difference between the
          first (1988), second (2000) and third (2004) edition.

          ISO 8601 allow to omit the time designator T by mutual agreement and
          if there is no risk of confusing. IMCO omit do mean, there is no
          separator.

          On the other side the space character separate the value in two parts,
          both are conform to ISO 8601.

          Personally I think using a space character as time separator in
          documents is a solution in spirit of ISO 8601 and maybe better
          readable for humans (which wide use a space to separate the date and
          time part of a time stamp). But it should used only together with the
          complete calendar date extended format and a time extended format
          which specify at least hour and minute.

          Such a format is used e.g. for SQL already.

          on 2005-09-27T19:43:25+02:00 you wrote:
          > Does anyone have the enact statement?

          Take a look in the link list of this mailinglist, you can find some
          Draft documents of ISO 8601 (first and second edition):
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ISO8601/links/Links_to_PDF_Copies__001009378840/

          The relevant statement is a note in section 5.4.1 (4.3.2 in the third
          edition).

          wkr Peter.

          p.s. Please use plain text only mails, instead of html + plain text.
        • piebaldconsult
          section 5.4.1 (2000 version) The character [T] shall be used... blah blah blah section 4.4 (2000 version) The space character shall not be used in the
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
            section 5.4.1 (2000 version)

            "The character [T] shall be used... blah blah blah"

            section 4.4 (2000 version)

            "The space character shall not be used in the representations."


            But I also use a space in human interfaces.
          • Tex Texin
            I explain it as the T is silent.
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
              I explain it as "the T is silent."

              piebaldconsult wrote:
              >
              > section 5.4.1 (2000 version)
              >
              > "The character [T] shall be used... blah blah blah"
              >
              > section 4.4 (2000 version)
              >
              > "The space character shall not be used in the representations."
              >
              > But I also use a space in human interfaces.
            • Pete Forman
              ... How do you pronounce your name? :-) -- Pete Forman -./ .- Disclaimer: This post is originated WesternGeco -./ .- by
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 28, 2005
                At 2005-09-27 21:52 -0700, Tex Texin wrote:
                >I explain it as "the T is silent."

                How do you pronounce your name? :-)

                --
                Pete Forman -./\.- Disclaimer: This post is originated
                WesternGeco -./\.- by myself and does not represent
                pete.forman@... -./\.- opinion of Schlumberger, Baker
                http://petef.port5.com -./\.- Hughes or their divisions.
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