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Re: Reading, Writing, and Speaking ISO 8601

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  • valximus
    ... interchange ... I apologize. As a newbie, I came away with the wrong impression of the ISO 8601 (I didn t realize it was set forth _strictly_ for
    Message 1 of 24 , Dec 31, 2004
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      --- In ISO8601@yahoogroups.com, Tex Texin <tex@x> wrote:
      > I think you came away with the wrong impression.
      >
      > A standard form of expression would be nice. However:
      >
      > 1) This is a forum for discussion of a date standard used for
      interchange
      > between computers.
      > You are proposing a different context that is out of scope.
      > It is not that it is unimportant, it is just off topic in this forum.
      > We pointed to other forums that want to talk about such matters.

      I apologize. As a newbie, I came away with the wrong impression of the
      ISO 8601 (I didn't realize it was set forth _strictly_ for computers).
      I'll take my random questions elsewhere. . . maybe start a petition
      for an ISO 8601-h for humans. :-)

      However, slightly on topic, while I realize various cultures express
      a.m./p.m. differently, are there any cultures that use ss:hh:mm or
      mm:ss:hh or ss:mm:hh as is the free-for-all with dates? That would be
      really funky. :-)
    • John Steele
      Actually, this group started an offshoot group, wwdates, specifically for such discussions, and Tex has been trying to get such discussions discussed there.
      Message 2 of 24 , Jan 1, 2005
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        Actually, this group started an offshoot group, wwdates, specifically for such discussions, and Tex has been trying to get such discussions discussed there. Unfortunately, the group has never really gotten off the ground. You might want to cut and paste some basic points to a message there and try to get the discussion going.
         
        I don't agree 8601 is STRICTLY for computers; if it were, it would have used a day count (Julian or otherwise) or "stardate" or something and not quirky Gregorian dates and human (mixed mode) time metrics. However, it is for clear computer data interchange and reliable parsing while maintaining (some level of) human readability.

        valximus <iso8601@...> wrote:



        I apologize. As a newbie, I came away with the wrong impression of the
        ISO 8601 (I didn't realize it was set forth _strictly_ for computers).
        I'll take my random questions elsewhere. . . maybe start a petition
        for an ISO 8601-h for humans. :-)

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