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[ISO8601] Re: ISO 8601 Hall of Fame.

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  • g1smd@amsat.org
    [2001-Jan-05] Another nomination for the ISO 8601 Hall of Fame. This time, an American site that is doing it right. In fact this site is set in a small corner
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 4, 2001
      [2001-Jan-05]



      Another nomination for the ISO 8601 Hall of Fame.

      This time, an American site that is doing it right. In fact this site is set
      in a small corner of NASA. Perhaps even more surprising.

      See: <http://umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/eit/eit_full_res.html> and most of the
      rest of the site centred around: <http://umbra.nascom.nasa.gov/>.

      Images are captioned with dates like '2000-12-31' (or '2000/12/31') or
      '2000-Dec-31', and the text contains dates written in the form '2000 Dec 31'
      or '2000 December 31'.

      The writer of most of that Web Site tells me that:

      > Our usage of the ASCII time format stems from the CCSDS
      > specification for ancillary data,
      >
      > http://www.ccsds.org/documents/text/CCSDS-301.0-B-2.txt

      which encourages the use of several date formats that are close to, or
      subsets of, those defined by the ISO 8601 standard. These standards have
      been in place within NASA for at least 10 years. Unhappily the CCSDS Web
      Site does not itself make use of these simple date formats, though I have
      presented a good argument yesterday why they should now consider doing so.
      The writer of the Umbra/EIT Site also said:

      > As for the "big-endian" (year/month/day) order, the uniformity is
      > probably an expression of personal preference (I've always thought it
      > illogical to lead with the least significant bit of information in a
      > date or address, and have always preferred the Russian way of listing
      > country, town, street, and name [in that order] in addresses).


      Maybe this small corner of NASA can be used as a good example in order to
      get some of the more well known NASA centres to start using these formats on
      their Web sites, and in their documents in the future.

      We can try!



      Cheers,

      Ian.


      <g1smd@...>


      <http://www.qsl.net/g1smd/>
      <http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/dstrange/y2k.htm>

      <ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/ham/misc/g1smd.zip>
      <ftp://ftp.qsl.net/pub/g1smd/>


      [2001-01-05]

      .end
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