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Re: [ICG-D] reading the book

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  • Elaine Mami
    I agree! Since I read huge amounts of stuff, and still run into references I have not yet read (or don t care to read), and since I go to very few movies (I
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 7, 2000
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      I agree! Since I read huge amounts of stuff, and still run into references
      I have not yet read (or don't care to read), and since I go to very few
      movies (I see the videos eventually) and don't watch lots of anime, etc., I
      find all of those suggestions are terrific. I also don't hesitate to ask
      the other judges if they know the reference and if it fits or not. That's
      why judges work in panels, not solo.

      Elaine

      > The only thing to do, is to assume that the judges are idiots (not
      >always
      >true), or have spent their lives, up until five minutes ago, in a
      >monestary,
      >without televison, or the internet, at the top of the hightest mountain, in
      >a cell, while locked in a closet without sight, sound, or any other imput.
      >So, you get the book; copy out the passages that you are re-creating; and
      >staple them to the form; one copy for the judges; one copy for the
      >workmanship judge; one copy for the M.C. so that he can tell the judges
      >"that was a re-creation of blah blah blah from that thing"; maybe then, you
      >have a chance of getting your point across.

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    • lisa58@juno.com
      Regarding Alixandra s comment: No matter how wonderfully or accurately I can re-create a costume from a visual or written image, it has to do something on
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 7, 2000
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        Regarding Alixandra's comment:

        No matter how wonderfully or accurately I can re-create a costume from a
        visual or written image, it has to do something on stage for people to
        relate to it somehow. Of course, audiences (and judges) seem to like it
        if it has some sort of glitz to it. That's not always possible, to stay
        true to the image. Costumes from the Star Wars movies are a case in
        point. BUT, if the costume does something that is within the character's
        range, or even a twisted something on stage, peopl will like it even if
        they are unfamiliar with the source.

        I tend to avoid long narrative intros read by the MC. I'll usually edit
        it at least three times if it's more than an average sentence. With
        "Mists of Avalon", (Merlin and Morgaine and the whole idea of the
        transfer of power from one to the other) I had to give some sort of
        intro, so I used an early passage from the book, in MZ Bradley's own
        written words, but I kept it short. With the "Isis" there was no intro,
        just a measure's length of drumbeats from the soundtrack I had chosen,
        since I Was starting on stage in blackout. With the Isis, the stage
        presentation was very simple--walking the stage, sideways and positioning
        the wings the way Isis is depicted in hieroglyphs--it's a very
        recognizable image, even in profile.

        With recreations, I still believe that, if your presentation doesn't
        have a specific story to tell, shorter is better--anything that will
        highlight a trait of the character wearing the costume. The
        presentations I"ve seen that the narration goes on and on and then the
        poor costumer comes out to "act out" what the narration has already
        presented, tend to be less interesting visually.

        Yours in costuming, Lisa A.
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      • Betsy Delaney
        Alixandra, this is an excellent rule of thumb, in general. In high school, my art teacher caught me subtitling one of my pieces. He told me that if people
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 7, 2000
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          Alixandra, this is an excellent rule of thumb, in general.

          In high school, my art teacher caught me subtitling one of my pieces. He
          told me that if people couldn't figure it out by looking at it, there
          was a problem with the piece. That rule has stuck with me for, well, at
          least 20 years now.

          Much of my stuff remains obscure, but I try to make sure that it carries
          the message without assuming that the judges have seen the source
          material.

          The one recreation I did try (at CC9) was so obscure that I had to
          provide the book cover - and I think I might have received something,
          too, if I had had some sort of presentation. (I have the tape - I wince
          every time I watch it!). I was recognized for the workmanship, which is
          really what's important to me, but there's just no way you can guarantee
          that the judges will know the source material.

          -betsy

          Alix Jordan wrote:
          >
          > Dear Lisa:
          >
          > >Sometimes I wish they would Read The Book!
          >
          > No matter how many people have read the book; seen the movie; bought the
          > print, you are best off assuming that the judges don't read; have never seen
          > a movie; and are blind. [snip]


          --
          Betsy R. Delaney
          Web Mistress at large
          WebInvent.com, Inc.

          ************************************************************************
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          mailto:Costume-Con@... or visit http://www.Costume-Con.org/
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        • Alix Jordan
          ... No matter how many people have read the book; seen the movie; bought the print, you are best off assuming that the judges don t read; have never seen a
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 7, 2000
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            Dear Lisa:


            >Sometimes I wish they would Read The Book!

            No matter how many people have read the book; seen the movie; bought the
            print, you are best off assuming that the judges don't read; have never seen
            a movie; and are blind. It doesn't matter if the costume is from the
            leading movie of the day! There will be judges who have never heard of it.
            I've done costumes from books; I've done costumes form Terry Pratchett's
            books, and he sells as many books as Stephan King! His books have garnered
            him an OBE! But will the judges recognize it. No. My friend, Linda, did a
            Deja Thoris, from the book. It was accurate, but since it didn't look like
            a Frank Frazeta cover, they didn't get it.
            The only thing to do, is to assume that the judges are idiots (not always
            true), or have spent their lives, up until five minutes ago, in a monestary,
            without televison, or the internet, at the top of the hightest mountain, in
            a cell, while locked in a closet without sight, sound, or any other imput.
            So, you get the book; copy out the passages that you are re-creating; and
            staple them to the form; one copy for the judges; one copy for the
            workmanship judge; one copy for the M.C. so that he can tell the judges
            "that was a re-creation of blah blah blah from that thing"; maybe then, you
            have a chance of getting your point across.

            Peace
            Alixandra
            eddana@...
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          • Jeff & Susan Stringer
            ... The only book character I ever did that received an award was Queen Iris of Xanth. It was a big purple southern belle type dress with hoop slip, sequins
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 9, 2000
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              > , in MZ Bradley's own
              > written words, but I kept it short. With the "Isis" there was no intro,

              The only book character I ever did that received an award was Queen Iris of
              Xanth. It was a big purple southern belle type dress with hoop slip, sequins
              and 6 huge Iris petals made of netting and sprinkled with glitter.
              Presentation was that Queen Iris was an Illusionist (I think) and that I was
              having a great deal of fun watching everyone dodge the imaginary cars this
              weekend. Neither the design nor the presentation had anything to do with the
              book. But the dress was big & glitzy and the audience laughed, because
              everyone was J-walking across a VERY busy street between the Convention
              center & the hotel, thus having many close encounters with the cars.

              I won "Most Beautiful" and met my best beloved Jeff, who won "Best Hunk". I
              pinched his Hunky butt after the masquerade and the rest is history ;-)

              Hugs,
              Susan
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