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Re: [ICG-D] Re: Re-creations

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  • Katherine Jepson
    Michael Whelan paintings are a dream to work from, compared with some artists -- he paints his human characters in proportion with real human beings! Also, he
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 6, 2000
      Michael Whelan paintings are a dream to work from, compared with some
      artists -- he paints his human characters in proportion with real human
      beings! Also, he knows that clothes have to have seams.

      When I did the recreation of "Judith" by James Christensen (CC13), I
      quickly discovered that the painted figure had impossibly long arms, and
      what appeared to be two elbows on one of them! There are 9
      "elements" or layers of different technique on one sleeve, and 11 on the
      other, and she has them pushed up her forearms; I'd either have to
      crush them horribly, or wear them to my wrists (which is what I
      did).

      When Eileen Capes and I did the Whelan Queens (ConAdian), Eileen did the
      masks (although I did make some of the impossible flowers :)) and I was
      left with the fun part of inventing everything below the shoulders.

      I agree that recreation is a more exacting form of our art; my problem
      doing "originals" is figuring out when to stop fiddling and say, "Done!"

      Pierre & Sandy Pettinger wrote:
      > Also, what
      > do the parts you can't see look like? There have been at least 4 Whelan's
      > "Summer Queen" versions I've seen at major cons (including mine) and all
      > had a different take on the dress. If you don't know the painting, all
      > that's visible is head and shoulders, and a small part of one sleeve. The
      > shoulders are covered by a cape. No clues as to what the dress looks
      > like. Granted, the headdress is the challenge (flowers don't EXIST in
      > those shapes!!), but....
      >
      > Also, most of the time the articles aren't in proportion - if you measure
      > one part and scale it up, then another part doesn't fit when made to the
      > same scale.
    • lisa58@juno.com
      Assuming that we can all work on getting the documentation to the judges, I always write up notes explaining why I used a certain fabric, texture, etc. The
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 6, 2000
        Assuming that we can all work on getting the documentation to the judges,
        I always write up notes explaining why I used a certain fabric, texture,
        etc.

        The point about costuming from a book cover is right on. When I did
        "Hawkmistress" from the Darkover series, the cover is a close upof her
        from the waist up. It was an interesting coincidence that I happened to
        know the artist (from before she did the cover), and she made some
        colored-pencil sketches for me of details (the exact plaid of the cape,
        the trim on the tunic), and what the trousers and boots would look like,
        etc. I put those sketches in my documentation (having followed them
        pretty closely). I even included the artist's "signature" design on the
        cape where it showed in the picture. If you get a knowledgaeable
        workmanship judge, they do enjoy things like that.

        Obviously with a recreation, if you can't see the bottom, or the back, or
        the hairstyle under a hood, for example, that's where your judgment and
        knowledge of the character in the book comes in. As with a historical,
        as long as you can justify your creative decisions, it should all work
        harmoniously.

        Recreations are blasted difficult to get right, most of the time.

        Yours in costuming, Lisa A.




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      • randwhit@aol.com
        In a message dated 12/6/00 7:56:08 AM US Mountain Standard Time, ... Assuming he s painting humans that is. I received an e-mail last year asking me to
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 6, 2000
          In a message dated 12/6/00 7:56:08 AM US Mountain Standard Time,
          kathnbiz@... writes:

          > Michael Whelan paintings are a dream to work from, compared with some
          > artists -- he paints his human characters in proportion with real human
          > beings! Also, he knows that clothes have to have seams.


          Assuming he's painting humans that is.

          I received an e-mail last year asking me to reproduce an elven magician from
          one of his paintings. Since the character is obviously in the middle of
          casting a powerful spell, his clothes are lofted every which-way and of
          course the figure is impossibly thin.

          That's one of the incidents that convinced me to stop doing custom work.
          Unrealistic expectations on the part of clients had gotten out of hand. I
          turned down the commission, but stopped short of pointing out that the
          requestor had violated copyright by e-mailing me a scan of the painting.

          Randall
        • Byron Connell
          Guilty, at least once. Byron ... you can count on having a judge that hasn t ever seen any particular movie. Yours in costuming, Lisa A.
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 6, 2000
            Guilty, at least once.

            Byron

            >>> lisa58@... 11/30/00 03:32PM >>>
            you can count on
            having a judge that hasn't ever seen any particular movie.

            Yours in costuming, Lisa A.
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